Introduction To Fluid Art
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Introduction To Fluid Art

5 Steps To Becoming a Paint Pouring Artist
4.5 (326 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
1,888 students enrolled
Created by Rick Cheadle
Last updated 8/2017
English
Price: Free
Includes:
  • 1 hour on-demand video
  • 12 Articles
  • 17 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • develop the skills and knowledge of paint pouring
  • create their own Paint Pouring masterpiece
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • The eagerness to learn the art of paint pouring
  • basic familiarity with painting is helpful
Description

Also known as paint pouring, flow art, liquid art.etc.

Is a form of abstract art that uses acrylic paints with a runny (fluid)consistency. The acrylic paints react with each other when combined together  to make interesting and visually  organic motifs. This type of art is fun for all ages. Fluid acrylics can be used on many types of substrates and in many different forms such as pouring, dripping, swirling, glazing, dipping and many other effects. Fluid art opens up a lot of possibilities and is definitely worth exploring and adding to your artist tool belt. In this course I will teach you everything you will need to become a paint pouring artist. I will share with you:

  • How to set up your paint pouring studio on a budget
  • complete supplies list
  • share all the techniques that I use like; dirty pour flip cup, puddle pours, swipe technique and more.

I will show you how to properly handle and care for your art

I will show you how to protect your artwork

The bonus section will have plenty of resources to refer to with information about mixing ratios, paint density and more

 Bonus Video footage of 16 minutes raw studio experiments with swipe technique!

Some of the videos are just me working with little or no talking. FYI

I'm here to help you become a confident Fluid Painting Artist..  Enroll in my Udemy Course Today! 


Who is the target audience?
  • Anyone interested in learning fluid painting art techniques
  • artists who want to expand their artistic horizon
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Curriculum For This Course
22 Lectures
01:06:23
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Introduction
2 Lectures 02:41

First, we must talk about safety!

There are hazards involved with anything in life and most problems can be avoided with a little knowledge and common sense.  This is also true when creating art.  Most products you purchase for your paint pouring endeavor will include instructions and safety recommendations. Read the SDS (Safety Data Sheet).  I would read and follow these thoroughly.  Always use caution when using anything caustic and when using any type of flame.  Be careful not to burn your canvas, paint or working area.  Off-gassing [ the release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) or other chemicals] is also hazardous. The silicone and all the stuff used in paint pouring wasn’t made to be heated up. Use caution! Workplace essentials Include the following:

 

  • Safety glasses
  • Protective clothing
  • Latex gloves
  • respirator
  • Co2 alarm
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Work in a well-ventilated area
What You Need To Get Started
00:12

Every endevour starts with a foundation. These are the essential elements needed to start paint pouring

Work Space Essentials
02:29
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Preparing Your Paints
5 Lectures 08:59

A question that is often asked is- "What is pouring medium?" and "Why do I need it?" This chart will help explain:

What Is Pouring Medium?
00:00

An Illustrated Look at What Pouring Medium is and What it is used for
05:04

Mixing Ratio Essentials

The consistency of all of your paints is the most essential element in assuring a successful pour.  The ways of achieving the ideal consistency varies quite a bit from one artist to another.  You may find that another artist's “recipe” suits you better.   By all means search until you’re happy and get the results you are looking for.

 I will show you how I personally achieve the proper fluidity that gives consistent results  for me, for students in my classes, and countless other paint-pouring enthusiasts that I hear from daily.  I recently released a video of an experiment where I spent, basically, ten dollars at a dollar store, came home, utilized my “mixology” and had amazing results.  Give my “budget” mix a chance. It is easy to do and it doesn’t cost much money. 

Mixing Recipes
02:25

Refer to this video clip so you can compare your fluidity. This consistency is a must to get on going fabulous results.

Paint Consistency
00:37

A Word About Cells
00:52
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Paint Pouring Techniques
4 Lectures 10:44

Puddle Pour

 

Puddle pours are a layering color(s) on the canvas in one or more puddles that allow the paint to flow out and or into each other. When there is enough paint on the surface the canvas can be tipped and the colors will disperse and create designs and unique color combinations throughout the canvas depending on the degree of tilting. A variation of this technique is a puddle pour with void fill (a puddle pour with an added pour covering the blank spots of the canvas) Once the canvas is covered I touch up the sides with the paint run off. Once I have complete coverage and I’m happy with the composition of the painting, I will introduce heat by using a chef’s torch or a heat gun. The heat is what helps generate cellular activity in the work. The oils from the additives react with the heat and create “cells”. Always use caution when heating up your art. Please follow all of the safety recommendations discussed earlier in the book.

Puddle Pour
00:41

It starts with The "Dirty Pour"

When I begin a dirty pour I usually start with white paint, adding a color or two, then I spray silicone in the cup , add more colors, add more white and so on. I average around 3 squirts of silicone per dirty pour cup separated by at least 2-3 colors. I stir the dirty pour cup very little if at all. I don’t stir too much because I want to maintain separation of the colors, not create mud.. Once you have all of your colors layered in a cup, you pour onto the substrate of choice. At this point you can move the substrate (for the remainder of the book I will refer to as “canvas”) Tipping the canvas and letting paint cover the whole surface and letting excess paint run over the edges gives the artwork a “flowing” appearance and there are many ways to manipulate the paint and get more design elements like scraping, swiping and skimming which I will cover later in this chapter.

Once the canvas is covered I touch up the sides with the paint run off. Once I have complete coverage and I’m happy with the composition of the painting, I will introduce heat by using a chef’s torch or a heat gun. The heat is what helps generate cellular activity in the work. The oils from the additives react with the heat and create “cells”. Always use caution when heating up your art. Please follow all of the safety recommendations discussed earlier 

The Dirty Pour
03:52

This is a technique I sometimes use prior to lifting a flip cup off the canvas. Basically I flip the cup onto the canvas, with the canvas sitting on the rack I simply slide the cup around the surface of the canvas making sure I get close to all four corners. My thought with this is that it will help with the flow of the paint upon lifting the cup.    

Flip Cup

The flip cup is prepared exactly like a dirty pour in terms of mixing and layering the paints into one dirty pour. The flip cup technique is more of a description of how you get the paint on the surface of your canvas. In short, you flip it over.

While holding the dirty pour cup (which is sitting on your work-space) with your left hand, pick up the canvas with your right hand and place the canvas face down over the cup opening. Then carefully (while holding the cup tightly against the canvas, flip them over to where now the canvas is on the work-space and the cup and the cup is sitting atop the canvas. I usually let the cup sit on the canvas for 20-30 seconds and allow the dirty pour contents to settle. Then with one motion I remove the cup from the canvas and all the paint pours out and onto the canvas. At this point I move and tilt  the canvas around and get full canvas coverage. Once the top is covered I touch up the sides of the canvas with the paint run off. Once the canvas is covered I touch up the sides with the paint run off. Once I have complete coverage and I’m happy with the composition of the painting, I will introduce heat by using a chef’s torch or a heat gun. The heat is what helps generate cellular activity in the work. The oils from the additives react with the heat and create “cells”. Always use caution when heating up your art.  

Flip Cup Pour
02:55

Swipe Technique

 

.

 I pick 3-5 colors for the background colors. Mix them according to my “mixology” and put 1-2 squirts of silicone in each color. I pour the 3-5 colors on the canvas in a striped pattern occasionally crossing over each other but not too much. At this point I tip the canvas to spread all the paints out over the canvas. Once I have the canvas covered in my background colors I introduce the swipe-over color. I use either white or black to do the swipe over. I make sure that the swiping color is slightly thicker than the other paints. I do not add silicone to the swiping colors. I always start at the end that I like the least. I pour a strip of paint from corner to corner approx. 1-3 inches wide depending on size of canvas or another guide is cover 10%- 20% of one end of the canvas. Then I take heavy card stock or a 3 ml laminating sheet or something similar and begin swiping the white paint over the initial paints that were poured. I sometimes add more white and repeat the process throughout the whole canvas until I get the look I’m trying to achieve. Doing these swiping motions should generate many cells when done correctly. Getting a feel for the swipe is the key. You want to gently skim the heavy card stock or a 3 ml laminating sheet or something similar lightly over the paints. This takes practice but it is worth the time to get this right.

Swipe Technique
03:16
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After The Pour
3 Lectures 03:59
Tips On Drying
00:39

Pre-Finish Surface Preparation
02:10

Finishing Your Art
01:10
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Bonus Section
8 Lectures 37:22
Multi-Mini Cup Striatian Technique
04:44

crackle recipe
00:00

How Much Paint Should You Put In Your Dirty Pour Cup?
00:00

Fluid Painting/Paint Pouring Pioneers
00:54

16 Minute Studio Footage of Experimenting with Swiping Technique
16:05

Multi-Layer (Pour Over)

Begin with picking out your colors then start layering colors in various patterns  on top of each other keeping in mind not to pour too much paint on the surface (too much paint increases the chance of cracks to form). Once you have the whole canvas covered you then pour either a single color or a dirty pour directly on the pre-pourd canvas. I like to do this in a flowing swirling type pattern and just let the paint do it’s thing. Too much tipping and tilting of the canvas at this point will disapate what you have created with the over-pour. However, if you are unhappy with the results of that added layer, you can tip the canvas and let the paint off and try again. Or my go to solution when I’m just not happy with what I’m seeing. Swipe it!

The art below was made with a four color dirty pour followed by heating the surface to create the cells. Finished with another dirty cup pour with three colors.

Multi-Layer (Pour Over)
00:07

Everything to start pouring is available at the dollar store!

Dollar Store Project Video
09:18

Experimental Paint Pour Using Apple Barrel Paints. Dimethicone was added to one Color Only

Cheap Craft Paint Demo Using The Swipe Method
06:13
About the Instructor
Rick Cheadle
4.5 Average rating
322 Reviews
1,895 Students
2 Courses
Artist/Instructor

Rick Cheadle is a mixed-media artist. Inspired by his longstanding fascination with Mid Century art and design compositions that he grew up with, Cheadle's expansive portfolio is collected world-wide and includes large-scale wall art pieces, commission works for The Johnny Cash Museum, wall sculptures, found objects mobiles, as well as a plethora of mixed media works.


(From the Publication Let's Make Stuff) Multilayered and full of vibrant colors, Rick Cheadle artwork weaves tales of a beloved era in design and a unique blend of modern techniques to reignite our senses and fill our lives with beautiful colorscapes.