Beyond PowerPoint: Teach Online With ScreenFlow (v4) For Mac

Learn essentials of video screen recording so you can digitize your knowledge, flip the classroom and teach online now.
  • Lectures 40
  • Video 8 Hours
  • Skill level all level
  • Languages English
  • Includes Lifetime access
    30 day money back guarantee!
    Available on iOS and Android
    Certificate of Completion

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Course Description

(Important update: This course was developed in 2013 and uses ScreenFlow version 4. A newer version of ScreenFlow (v5) was released on November 4, 2014. The course author has released a new course based on the version 5 software. The new course, ScreenFlow version 5 Essentials: Teach Online Today, was released on December 31, 2014. If you're an existing student of Mel's ScreenFlow version 4 course AND have recently upgraded to ScreenFlow version 5, message the author, Mel Aclaro, for a discount coupon to his newest course today.)

Learn the Fundamentals of ScreenFlow and Create Your Online Course Now.

You will start with the demonstration of a sample feature-rich animated web video screencast -- then you'll learn to replicate it.

In this course, you'll learn how to use ScreenFlow for Macintosh -- one of the "Big 3" video screen capture and editing software programs in the market used by professional screencasters and online learning professionals. But, your learning won't stop there.

Delivered by a professional screencaster, online learning architect, and winner of the 2012 Techsmith Best In Category ScreenChamp award.

Testimonials

"Mel has a uniquely 'feet on the ground,' personable style with emphasis always being on the message rather than the messenger..."
~ Richard Andrews, TTA Online Course Creator & Facilitator

"I had hired a college student as a marketing assistant to help me with other aspects of executing our marketing efforts but she had zero experience with video...One week later, Kristin was producing amazing videos... Mel delivers a comprehensive and intuitive learning style that is easy to follow for students with any level of experience."
~ Scott Schang, Broadview Mortgage Katella Team

Go beyond the classroom. Learn how to transform your live presentations, workshops and live training courses to a digitized format that's easily shared, easily consumed and potentially profitable.

Don't be boring. Learn to kick your online presentations up a notch from run-of-the-mill online presentations by overlaying quality audio and synchronizing live action web video to increase your audience's engagement.

What are the requirements?

  • Mac OS X 10.6.8 and higher with Intel based CPU.
  • Telestream's ScreenFlow version 4.x (free trial available via Telestream.com)

What am I going to get from this course?

  • Over 40 lectures and 7.5 hours of content!
  • Record a PowerPoint or Keynote presentation
  • Record a simple presentation from your computer screen
  • Apply fundamental screencast editing, animation and transition features using ScreenFlow version 4.x
  • Import video and audio media into a ScreenFlow project for editing
  • Animate video, images, callouts
  • Apply basic audio filters to boost the quality of your audio
  • Synchronize audio and music with video in your ScreenFlow project
  • Publish your project as a video suitable for sharing on the web

What is the target audience?

  • Udemy instructors
  • Online learning and screencasting content authors with novice through intermediate skills
  • Subject matter experts seeking to create online training modules or courses
  • Bloggers seeking to create more engaging content
  • Teachers and educators seeking to "flip" the classroom
  • Corporate trainers

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee

Forever yours.
Lifetime access

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion

Curriculum

Section 1: INTRODUCTION
04:25

Welcome! Before you get started, watch this video to get a lay of the land. In this video, you’ll not only learn about the overall structure of the lectures, but you’ll also learn about other resources, groups and forums that, together with the modules in this course, will help you maximize the value you get from the course.

Highlights

07:06

In this lecture you'll see a sample video that we'll use as the basis for learning essential ScreenFlow features.

Included in these essential feature sets are: importing different types of media; scaling and sizing media in the timeline; synchronizing media elements so they interact in compelling ways; animating media objects; recording any presentation displayed on your computer screen--including PowerPoint and Keynote presentations; overlaying music and voiceovers; publishing your video presentation for distribution over the internet; and much more.

Highlights

00:20 - The sample video.

02:30 - Pointing out specific features: tracks; audio clips; video clips; image clips; playhead/scrubber; etc.

04:50 - The PowerPoint presentation.

05:50 - The music track.

Section 2: GETTING UP AND RUNNING WITH SCREENFLOW
14:40

Here you'll get a lay of the land. Specifically, you'll learn about main sections of the ScreenFlow editor -- you're main workspace.

Highlights
  • 00:10 - The canvas / viewer. What you see here is what your video will look like.
  • 00:57 - The timeline.
  • 01:40 - How layering, tracks and clips interact in the timeline.
  • 03:30 - The playhead / scrubber and its relationship to the time and frames.
  • 04:29 - How to interpret the time and frame display.
  • 05:30 - A visual example of the concept of "frames."
  • 06:13 - Player controls.
  • 06:30 - The resizing button sets the canvas dimensions.
  • 07:00 - Setting the canvas color.
  • 07:45 - Adjusting the height of the timeline.
  • 08:03 - Adjusting the scale/size of the canvas. (Note: Scaling the canvas doesn't change its dimension.)
  • 09:13 - The Properties panel.
  • 09:30 - The media bin.
  • 10:00 - Text properties panel.
  • 10:15 - Annotations panel.
  • 10:45 - Callouts panel.
  • 11:30 - Screen recording properties.
  • 12:34 - Audio properties.
  • 13:40 - Video properties.
  • 14:05 - Timeline scaling slider.
Text

(INSTRUCTOR'S NOTE: There's a known issue with this knowledge check module running inconsistently on mobile devices other than the iPad or iPhone. This isn't a Udemy platform issue. Rather, it's a current limitation of the vendor's software (Articulate Storyline) with which this module was authored. (iPad/iPhone users can download the FREE Articulate Mobile Player app via this page.) In any case, you can access this module using a standard desktop/laptop web browser.)


Before you move on, let’s take a moment to check your understanding of the features in the ScreenFlow editor. Click the image to open another web page where you’ll be able to check your knowledge against an interactive knowledge storyboard.

06:33

In this lecture, you'll learn how to import different types of media items into your project.

Highlights
  • 00:00 - How to start a new (empty document) project.
  • 00:20 - Revisiting the media bin. This is where imported video, audio and still images are stored.
  • 00:45 - Importing media.
  • 01:35 - Adding media to the timeline from the media bin.
  • 02:45 - Adjusting the size (scaling) of objects in the canvas via "handles".
  • 03:40 - The effect of adding more media "on top" of other media in the timeline.
  • 05:30 - Adjusting the size of the timeline so you can see more of it.
  • 06:00 - Changing view types and sort order in the media bin.
01:38

In this video you'll learn about saving -- and some of the ScreenFlow/Mac nuances of saving -- your ScreenFlow project.

05:15

In this lecture, you'll have an opportunity to practice some of the techniques you've learned so far.

The tasks you must perform include:
  1. Open a new (blank) project with dimensions of HD 720p (1280 x 720)
  2. Import the video file titled, "ex-video1.mp4". (See the Supplementary Material section below.)
  3. Import the still image file titled, "ex-website.tiff". (See the Supplementary Material section below. Align it with the point in the project where the subject in the video "points" to his left as he identifies a website.)
  4. (Optional.) Download an audio mp3 file of your choice from the free (non-commercial) archive.org website

If you have questions or would like to discuss different techniques, make sure and either post your questions in the Question panel, or (better yet) post your question in the subscribers only Q&A group ("Digital-Know-How") on Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/groups/DigitalKnowHow/

13:42

In this lecture, you can follow along and compare notes about how to complete the objectives from Activity 1. Keep in mind, there are more ways than the methods I show in this video to accomplish the objectives.

If you have questions or would like to discuss different techniques, make sure and either post your questions in the Question panel, or (better yet) post your question in the subscribers only Q&A group ("Digital-Know-How") on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/DigitalKnowHow/

17:58

In this lecture, you'll learn how to set up for recording and then initiate recording of presentations on your computer screen.

Highlights
  • 00:30 - A word about the advantages of recording PowerPoint, Keynote and other presentations using ScreenFlow vs. using the built-in recording features within PowerPoint and Keynote. (ScreenFlow offers many more professionally advantageous features.)
  • 01:20 - How to quickly clean up your desktop in order minimize distractions for your learners.
  • 02:30 - Launching ScreenFlow and viewing the recording menu and configuration window.
  • 03:50 - About the parameters in the recorder configuration window. Includes:

"Record Desktop From:

"Record Video From"

"Record Audio From"

"Record Computer Audio"

  • 10:15 - Initiating the recording.
  • 12:30 - Stopping and then saving the recording.
  • 13:00 - Taking inventory of the items that got recorded based on the settings you choose in the recorder configuration window.
Supplemental Video: 6 Must Do Tips For a Quality Screencast

See the Supplementary Material section below for the reference video titled, 6 Must Do Tips For A Quality Screencast.

12:53

In this lecture, you'll learn how to add additional desktop video recordings and audio voiceovers directly into your current project.

Highlights
  • 00:55 - Replacing an image with a new screen video recording.
  • 01:29 - The "Add Additional Recording" menu and configuration settings.
  • 03:25 - Initiating the "Add Additional Recording" recorder.
  • 04:05 - Stopping the "Add Additional Recording" recorder.
  • 04:30 - Replacing a media item in the timeline with the new recording.
  • 06:00 - Trimming the new recording and making fine tune adjustments.
  • 07:30 - Adding an audio voiceover.
10:34

In this lecture you’ll learn how to trim and split media clips in the timeline. Learning how to apply trimming and splitting edits is important because more often than not, you will typically have “surplus” content that you don’t want to include in the final production. Trimming helps you eliminate unwanted content along the ends of clips. Meanwhile, splitting helps you do that in the middle of clips.

Highlights

  • 00:20 – The difference between trimming and splitting.
  • 00:35 – How to trim content from the ends of a media clip.
  • 03:25 – How to split media clips.
  • 06:40 – How to join clips after having split and deleted a middle segment.
  • 07:20 – Smoothing the transition where media clips have been joined after a split.
  • 08:00 – Click-and-drag method for splitting and deleting a middle segment from a clip. (The range selection tool.)
04:52

UPDATE: LECTURE NUMBER HAVE CHANGED! In this video, I make referenct to "Lecture Number 11." The actual lecture number has since changed and is now Lecture number 10.

In this activity, you’ll practice capturing a video screen recording of your computer desktop. Though you will record a website as the subject of this activity, the same steps will allow you to record pretty much any other activity on your computer desktop including: other websites, software, document navigation, and so on.

The tasks you will be asked to perform include:

1. Download and unpack the exercise file:

a. From the Supplementary Materials section below, download the ScreenFlow project file titled: exercise-master-activity2.screenflow.zip Make note of the location to which you download it. (Alternatively, you may choose to use your own project if you like.)

b. If you choose to use the screenflow project file provided, then find the file you just downloaded to your computer and double-click it. Your Mac OS Archive Utility should automatically start and unpack the zip file. A new file titled exercise-master-activity2.screenflow will appear in the same folder.

2. Open the exercise-master-activity2.screenflow file.

3. Find and delete the clip in the timeline that represents the website still image. It appears at about the 0:30 second point in the project.

4. Replace the image you just deleted with your own screen recording of your favorite website. (Tip: Make sure your new video screen recording is scaled appropriately when you place it i the timeline. Hint: Lecture 5 showed you the technique for scaling.)

If you have questions or would like to discuss different techniques, make sure and either post your questions in the Question panel, or (better yet) post your question in the subscribers only Q&A group ("Digital-Know-How") on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/DigitalKnowHow/

10:36

In this lecture, you can follow along and compare notes about how to complete the objectives from Activity 2. Keep in mind, there are more ways than the methods I show in this video to accomplish the objectives.

If you have questions or would like to discuss different techniques, make sure and either post your questions in the Question panel, or (better yet) post your question in the subscribers only Q&A group ("Digital-Know-How") on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/groups/DigitalKnowHow/

19:02

In this lecture you'll learn how to use ScreenFlow to record a slideshow presentation made in PowerPoint for Mac or Keynote. You'll quickly see that the actual mechanics for recording the presentation itself is no different than the steps you learned in lectures 10 and 11. Rather, the main points here will be an understanding of the relationship between the default video dimensions of the recorded PowerPoint or Keynote slideshow in relation to the display dimensions of the video player. The fact is, most hosted video sites including: YouTube, Udemy, Vimeo, Wistia, and others conform to high definition aspect ratios -- also known as "16:9" aspect ratio. (Aspect ratio is the relationship between the width and the height of a video or video player.) PowerPoint and Keynote slideshows, on the other hand, are typically displayed in standard definition aspect ratio -- also known as "4:3" aspect ratio.

See also the members only Digital-Know-How Q&A group on Facebook for more discussions about video dimensions and compression ratios for videos. There's also a video reference in the Supplemental Topics section below that gives a history of aspect ratio.

  • 01:05 - A professional caveat about ("Death By PowerPoint") using the built-in recording features in PowerPoint and Keynote and why I'm not an advocate of that method.
  • 03:20 - Why recording a PowerPoint or Keynote presentation with ScreenFlow is a better recording method than built-in feature in PowerPoint and Keynote.
  • 04:20 - Recording PowerPoint/Keynote slideshow with ScreenFlow: the steps.
  • 06:00 - It's important to consider the video dimensions of the hosting platform on which you'll display.
  • 06:50 - Considerations to keep in mind for PowerPoint/Keynote videos (4:3 aspect ratio) that play within an HD (16:9 aspect ratio) video hosting display. (e.g., YouTube, Udemy, Vimeo, etc.) "Pillar boxes" (black bars) will appear along the sides.
  • 10:00 - How to "dress up" the pillar boxes for your PowerPoint/Keynote slideshow video inside an HD video display.
  • 13:30 - Dressing up the background for your PowerPoint/Keynote.
  • 14:20 - Cropping out the pillar boxes and scaling the slideshow video.
  • 14:45 - Add a shadow to give depth to your PowerPoint/Keynote slideshow video.
  • 15:55 - Consider dressing up the "framing" of your PowerPoint/Keynote slideshow video further with custom backgrounds.
03:49

In this activity, you'll practice recording a PowerPoint or Keynote presentation. You can use the PowerPoint file provided (it should also open for Keynote 2013). Alternatively, you can also create your own custom presentation, as well. Here are a few settings to help you:

  • (Tip) Use the screen flow project you used in Activity 2 (also provided below) and use the "Additional Recording" steps you learned in Lecture 11 to record your PowerPoint/Keynote slideshow and add it to your project
  • Ensure you also have the proper audio source selected when you prepare the configuration for your recorder
  • When you add your recording to the timeline, use the scaling and/or cropping features to properly "fit" your PowerPoint/Keynote recording in the lower-right corner of the canvas.
06:57

In this lecture, let's "compare notes" on how you might have approached Activity 3. If you have questions, make sure to ask by posting them either in the Questions panel or in the members only Digital-Know-How Q&A Group on Facebook.

20:08

In this lecture, you’ll learn how to animate objects in your ScreenFlow project. It’s worth pointing out that when we talk about animation, we don’t mean cartoon-type animation. Rather, you’ll learn how to change the parameters of any object in the canvas over time. By doing so, you’ll give the perception of movement of objects in your video.

Highlights

00:15 – Examples of the type of animations in ScreenFlow.

01:45 – Example of “animating” audio.

02:55 – Four key things to consider when objects in your project. (What do you want to animate, What parameters to animate, When to begin the animation, When to end the animation.)

03:30 – Adding video actions: Changing parameters in a video clip. (Hint: Use Video Properties tab.)

07:15 – How to set default durations of video actions. (ScreenFlow Preferences / Timeline.)

10:25 – Animating (adding video action) to the Y-axis rotation (or X- or Z-axis rotation) of a video clip.

12:30 – How video clip animations (video actions) can be used to enhance your message.

14:00 – Changing opacity (transparency) of a clip over time.

16:25 – Adding video actions to multiple clips simultaneously.

17:30 – Audio action: Changing audio parameters over time. (Audio Properties tab.)

09:03

In this lecture, you’ll learn the difference between scaling and cropping. You’ll also learn when it might be more appropriate to use each technique in your projects, and you’ll also learn little-known shortcuts for cropping videos directly in the canvas.

Highlights

01:15 – Cropping

01:45 – Once cropped, you can then scale the cropped image!

02:10 – Use the Control key to crop visually in the canvas. This gives you more flexibility than cropping from the Video Properties panel.

03:45 – Cropping – and then scaling – video recordings of your PowerPoint or Keynote presentation can tighten up your presentations.

06:15 – You can animate the cropping parameter of videos. (Video Properties tab: Add Video Action.)

03:08

In this activity, you'll learn how to add a video action to resize the scale of a video clip over time.

Steps to do

1. Download and unpack the exercise file (you can also use the same project file you’ve already modified from previous activities):

a. Download the ScreenFlow project titled: exercise-master-activity2-scaling.screenflow.zip. Make note of the location to which you download the file. (Alternatively, you may use the same project file from previous activities.)

b. If you chose to use the screeflow project file provided, then find the file you just downloaded to your computer and double-click it. Your Mac OS Archive Utility should automatically start and unpack the zip file: a new file titled exercise-master-activity2-scaling.screenflow will appear in the same folder.

2. Open the exercise-master-activity2-scaling.screenflow file.

3. Add a video action to scale the size of the main video so that the subject appears to point at the website image at the appropriate time. (Hint: At about the 0:30 second point in the project.)

If you have questions or would like to discuss different techniques, make sure and either post your questions in the Question panel, or (better yet) post your question in the subscribers only Q&A group ("Digital-Know-How") on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/DigitalKnowHow/

04:56

In this lecture, let's "compare notes" on how you might have approached the task in Activity 4. If you have questions, make sure to ask by posting them either in the Questions panel or in the members only Digital-Know-How Q&A Group on Facebook.

13:57

Transitions can help smooth and soften adjoining clips. In this lecture, you’ll learn how to apply transitions to media clips in the timeline.

Highlights

0:45 – Steps for adding a transition to the end of any media clip in the timeline.

2:10 – Shortcut keyboard combinations for quickly adding a default transition to the beginning or ending of a clip. (Left: Option-Command-Comma. Right: Option-Command-Period).

3:40 – How to change the type of transition that you can apply. (Caution: Just because you have many transitions styles available doesn’t mean you should use them all!)

5:30 – How to set the default transition style. (Recommendation: Set “cross dissolve” as your default transition.)

6:20 – Extending the durations of transitions.

6:30 – Using Split clip to remove unwanted segments of a clip.

9:00 – Defining a selection range to delete a segment of a clip and automatically close gaps in the timeline.

10:00 – Example of how to use overlapping transition to smooth disjointed clip segments.

09:10

In this lecture you’ll learn how to add titles and annotations to your video projects. Titles and annotations are excellent tools for highlighting objects in your video productions so as to direct your viewers’ attention.

Highlights

1:30 – Adding a “lower third” title to your video.

2:30 – Adding text to your video.

3:50 – Changing the backdrop color and corner properties of your text box

6:20 – Adding annotations (boxes, arrows, lines, circles, etc.) in your video project.

03:55

This lecture is the first of a 4-part series about publishing your video for sharing on the web. In this lecture, you’ll learn about the concept of “rendering” video, as well as publishing options that are available to you in ScreenFlow.

05:16

This lecture is part 2 of a 4-part series about publishing your video for sharing on the web. In this lecture, you’ll learn about the option for publishing to a Flash video format. While I don’t recommend using this format for distributing your video content, it’s worth taking this moment to see how flash video is produced and distributed. (Note: Don’t let the complexity of files in this video discourage you. There are much easier methods that I’ll recommend in Parts 3 and 4 of this series.)

06:12

This lecture is part 3 of a 4-part series about publishing your video for sharing on the web. In this lecture, you’ll learn about the options available to you for publishing your project directly to YouTube or Vimeo. (Note: While this method makes it easy for you to publish directly to these popular video hosting platforms, I’ll explain in this video why I believe the Export method described later in Part 4 is superior to the option described here.)

Highlights

0:45 – About publishing to YouTube and About VideoTrafficAcademy: an affiliated course about traffic-generating strategies using YouTube. http://melaclaro.us/VideoTrafficAcademy

1:25 – About Vimeo Pro and when you might consider using it vs. YouTube.

2:35 – About another video hosting platform called Wistia.

3:10 – About the publish to YouTube / Vimeo process.

4:00 – Why I prefer using the Export option for publishing videos vs. the “publish to YouTube / Vimeo” procedure.

13:35

This lecture is part 4 of a 4-part series about publishing your video for sharing on the web. In this lecture, you’ll learn about my recommended option for exporting your video to the MP4 file format that’s popular for sharing videos on the internet.

Highlights

0:25 – The Export settings window.

2:20 – Keep in mind the dimensions and aspect ratios that were discussed in earlier videos. (CROSS-REFERENCE: See also the discussion about aspect ratio in Lecture 14: How to record PowerPoint or Keynote presentations.)

3:40 – Recommended Customize settings for video and audio datarate.

4:30 - Cross reference to Compression Guidelines. – helps to specify datarates for different video dimensions. https://vimeo.com/help/compression

7:45 – Producing and reviewing the MP4 file.

9:10 – Other preset options in the Export settings window.

12:00 – Review.

02:59

In this activity, you’ll practice using the techniques you learned in the previous 4 lectures to publish your practice video to the MP4 video file format.

Parameters and guidelines

    1.Publish to the MP4 video file format.

    2.Publish using 1280 x 720 (HD) video dimensions.

    3.Use the Web-High preset.

    4.Set your video data rate to 5,000 kbps.

    5.Set your audio data rate to 320 kbps.

    6.Discuss your findings and challenges in the Digital-Know-How Q&A group. https://www.facebook.com/groups/DigitalKnowHow/

Bonus exercise: Use ScreenFlow to create a testimonial video and publish it to your YouTube channel and share it in the Digital-Know-How Q&A group. https://www.facebook.com/groups/DigitalKnowHow/

Section 3: VALUE ENHANCEMENTS
13:40

In this lecture, you’ll learn about visual enhancements using ScreenFlow callouts to subtly direct the attention of your viewers and learners to specific areas of the screen.

Highlights

1:40 – The Callout Properties tab.

2:50 – Adding the Mouse Cursor callout effect.

6:20 – Adding the Foreground Window callout effect to selectively highlight active windows on your desktop.

8:50 - Adding the rectangular Freehand callout effect to selectively highlight any rectangular section of your video screen recording.

10:10 – Blurring (pixelating) different areas of your video screen recording.

11:05 – Adding a custom Freehand callout effect to selectively highlight custom shaped sections of your video screen recording.

09:37

One of the many features that differentiate ScreenFlow from its competitors is in the quantity of video and audio filters that are made available to you. While not all filters will be useful on all – or even most – projects, there are a few filters you should know about that will be useful in many projects. Specifically, in this lecture you will learn about the:

  • Exposure (video) filter
  • Vibrance (video) filter
  • (Audio) Mix Input to Mono

Highlights

03:10 – (Bonus) How to detach audio from a video clip

03:30 – Video filters: Exposure Adjust

04:45 – Video filters: Vibrance Adjust

05:40 – Audio Filters: Dynamics Processor to bump up the audio gain beyond the standard volume property.

07:00 – Mix input to mono to help balance mono-recorded audio sources that originally play out of one speaker.

08:05

(Note: This video teaches how to apply Ripple Delete and Ripple Insert in each of the "Big 3" screencast editors. See the bolded sections in the timecode list below to fast forward to the sections that are relevant to this course.) Timeline gaps are an inevitable byproduct of editing projects. When you delete a segment of clips in the timeline, a gap remains. While this may seem trivial, a common trap that new screencasters quickly discover is that filling this gap isn't always as simple as simply dragging clips from the right of the gap along the timeline. If there are multiple tracks, then it's important to ensure that clips on upper-level tracks stay in sync with those on lower tracks. You can do this in your screencasting software with a process called Ripple Delete.

Highlights

0:00 - >>Settng up the problem.<<

1:20 - >>Ripple Delete / Ripple Insert in ScreenFlow.<<

3:53 - Ripple Delete / Ripple Insert in Camtasia For Mac.

5:25 - Ripple Delete / Ripple Insert in Camtasia Studio.

15:38

This is part 1 in a 3-part series about how to set up for screencasting a Skype video interview. In part 1, I'll focus on showing you how I set up the hardware, software and settings with 3 points of view: You (the interviewer), your subject (the interviewee), and a third angle that your audience will relate to.

Just in case you were wondering, I used ScreenFlow to RECORD and EDIT the actual video. Consequently, another screen recording software was used as the demo platform. For this, I used Camtasia for Mac. However, as I explain at about the 2:00 point in the video, the same settings are also available in ScreenFlow for Mac. Below is a screenshot of the recording configuration window in ScreenFlow.

05:00

This is part 2 in this 3-part series about screencasting a Skype video interview. In part 1 (Lecture 32), I showed you how I arranged the cameras, the microphone and software settings for the interview. In this video, we follow up on the settings and proceed with the interview itself -- and I show you how to record it with a screencast editor such as ScreenFlow or Camtasia.

It's worth keeping in mind that although I used Camtasia for Macintosh to demo the recording of this Skype interview, the set up and process for recording your interview is just as easily conducted using ScreenFlow for Macintosh.

Key Highlights:

  • What did I use the Skype camera angle for? I used the Skype camera angle to illuminate my profile for the benefit of the interviewee.

  • What did I use the screencast editor's camera angle for? I used that to illuminate my profile for the benefit of engaging the audience who later views the interview video online.

07:55

This is part 3 in the 3-part series about screencasting your Skype video interview with PIP. In part 1 I showed you how I arranged the cameras, the microphone and software settings for the interview. In part 2, I demo'd the recording while showing camera and microphone alignment. In this video, I'll show you the end-product of the raw recording; you'll also see some helpful tips for editing and enhancing your Skype video interview so you can present it to your audience with a little more polish.

Note: It's worth keeping in mind that although I used Camtasia for Macintosh to demo the recording of the Skype interview in this video, the set up and process for recording is similarly accomplished in ScreenFlow for Macintosh; see part 1 in this series for a screenshot of the recording configuration in ScreenFlow.

INSTRUCTOR'S NOTE ABOUT THE PRODUCTION WORKFLOW SERIES
Preview
Text
27:38

This is the module where you’ll learn the 3-stage workflow I use for producing structured online presentations. Notice I’m being explicit about saying structured online presentations. This is to differentiate it from extemporaneous presentations — which, by their nature, have more of a “fly-by-the-seat-of-your-pants” allure.

(Note: Reference the Instructor's Note in Lecture 34 about the "software agnostic" context for this lecture, despite any demonstrations or references that use other, non-ScreenFlow, software.)

Highlights

0:00 - What we're going to do in the next few videos in this series. The big picture.

1:00 - What these terms mean: "Pre-production" vs. "Production" vs. "Post-production".

2:20 - Setting up for a quality screencast.

3:25 - Have some kind of activity on screen at least every minute. (The old convention of 2 minutes per PowerPoint slide is no longer acceptable in video-based presentation.)

5:15 - How important is audio quality?

5:45 - How long should your videos be? (2-3 minutes?) It depends. Are you selling? Is your visitor viewing your video for free? Or did your visitor pay for your content?

7:00 - What are some sources of inspiration you can draw from for your content?

12:50 - Presentation formats that work well for screencasting.

15:50 - What's your presentation style? Which should you consider for screencasting?

16:40 - My 3-stage production workflow for structured presentations.

19:40 - Workflow for extemporaneous presentations.

22:00 - Should you use animations in your PowerPoint presentations? How much is too much?

23:30 - A special case to be made for "motion path" animations in PowerPoint or Keynote.

24:53

In this video, I’ll show you the first stage of my 3-stage workflow, as well as details of all the considerations surrounding the where-fors and why-tos of first producing the script before doing anything else. (Again, this applies for structured presentations. Extemporaneous presentations are a little different — and in many ways easier and sometimes faster (though not always so) — than structured/scripted presentations.

(Note: Reference the Instructor's Note in Lecture 34 about the "software agnostic" context for this lecture, despite any demonstrations or references that use other, non-ScreenFlow, software.)

24:03

The second stage of the 3-stage production workflow is all about creating the audio file. And you’ll do that with the help of the script you recorded in the previous section. But, before we get there, you’ll find it helpful to know a little bit about the “physics” of quality audio. Audio quality is important in your video presentations because your learners/viewers will tend to “click away” from your video if the audio is of poor quality. In fact, your learner/viewers are more apt to suffer poor video quality (to a degree) more than they are to tolerate poor audio. Contrary to popular opinion, the quality of the microphone is NOT paramount. It definitely helps, but it isn’t the most influential factor for quality audio. In fact, in this video I’ll show you why it may actually be better to “dumb down” your microphone, depending on your ability (or not) to influence other, more important environmental factors.

(Note: Reference the Instructor's Note in Lecture 34 about the "software agnostic" context for this lecture, despite any demonstrations or references that use other, non-ScreenFlow, software.)

31:36

In this video you'll learn the tools, processes and audio software filters I use that will help you produce a seamless audio file that you will use in the third stage of the production workflow where you'll ultimately record the video segment of your online presentation. In this video: In addition to learning what software I use for editing and audio filtering, you'll also learn how to perform the edits and apply the appropriate filters. In fact, I'll demonstrate a live recording directly into the audio editor and show you, in real time, how the spoken word gets captured as wave forms. I'll make intentional errors during the recording step so you can see -- again in real time -- how to go about editing and applying two specific audio filters I frequently apply to the audio file.

(Note: Reference the Instructor's Note in Lecture 34 about the "software agnostic" context of this lecture, despite any demonstrations or references that use other, non-ScreenFlow, software.)

Production Workflow: Play Audio and Record Video!
34:06
Section 4: WRAPPING UP
03:36

Congratulations! You’ve learned – and done – a lot in this course. While the chances are that your first video screen recording projects may only require you to record a simple Keynote or PowerPoint presentation, you nonetheless now have the knowledge to make your online content rise head and shoulders above your competition by using techniques you learned throughout this course. But, knowing is only half the battle.

You now have to proactively create situations that will give you the opportunity to exercise that knowledge. Just like a student pilot must, at some point, take what she learns from, so-called, "ground school" and physically get into a cockpit so she can exercise the "stick-and-rudder" coordination that will make her proficient with flying her aircraft in a variety of weather conditions, so must you now take what you've learned from this "ground school" and exercise the stick and rudder of your trade so you can become proficient in creating digital knowledge to share with your viewers and learners.

Here are some video / training channels that I personally subscribe to which I think may inspire you, as well:

Instructor Biography

Mel Aclaro , Helping students digitize their knowledge for the web

Mel Aclaro (a.k.a., the "Screencasting Wizard") is a 15-year veteran of the eLearning industry. After a stint flying for the U.S. Navy, Mel got started in the online learning industry as a management consultant with Andersen Consulting (now Accenture). While there, he specialized in organizational change management, training and eLearning.

Today, Mel is the online learning architect and resident "Screencasting Wizard" at Kareo, one of Forbes' 2013 list of 100 Most Promising Companies in America. He also works with local small businesses and professional associations to develop compelling and engaging online web video "screencast" presentations to help them build niche audiences, reach more people and profit from their digital know-how.

Mel blogs regularly at ScreencastingWizard and is the author of Digital-Know-How, a training website devoted to developing learners' skills for screencasting and web video course development.

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  1. 5 Stars
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    • Rich Peterson

    Thorough Course

    Love the course content and the engaging way in which it's presented. Excellent job! I hope to make courses as good as this one day :)

    • Raulversus

    Excelente!

    Muy completo,detallado,el profesor conecta muy bien con la audiencia y conoce en profundidad la materia

    • Pei Kang

    Learn this before using your Screenflow!

    A friend recommended Mel's class. Thank Goodness I signed up before I started producing tons of videos. Quick and valuable tips. Plus he has great FB group with more discussions!

    • Paul McQuaid

    Highly Recommended.

    This is a brilliant course. Mel is the ultimate professional, explaining step by step how to master ScreenFlow. The content is relevant, practical, and engaging. The exercises reinforce the transfer of knowledge and skills, and has provided me great confidence in using ScreenFlow. Thanks Mel.

    • Stan Dubin

    An Exceptional Course!

    I would say I knew "something" about how to use Screenflow. I had seen many videos produced using it, but I was nowhere near that capable. So, I paid for Mel's course and I was soon able to do virtually all of the things I wanted to do. How soon? Well, within a few hours. I highly recommend the course.

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