American Sign Language, ASL, Level 1

A rich language-learning environment online taught by native signer for you to learn then apply to real life.
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170 students enrolled
Instructed by Erica Parker Language / Other
$40
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  • Lectures 23
  • Contents Video: 29 mins
    Other: 2 mins
  • Skill Level Beginner Level
  • Languages English
  • Includes Lifetime access
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    Available on iOS and Android
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About This Course

Published 4/2014 English

Course Description

You will learn the basic of American Sign Language (ASL), Deaf Culture and History of ASL from native language users.

Materials: ASL videos with English captions and quizzes for each lecture. No purchase needed.

It takes few hours or days to complete this course. It is self-pace learning. Enjoy and have fun.

Course Structure: You will watch the lecture videos then do assignments and take quizzes to show that you comprehend ASL.

This course is the first in a sequence that studies the structure, vocabulary, and conversational strategies of American Sign Language as it is used within the Deaf culture.

This course is intended for students interested in learning to communicate with members of the Deaf community as well as in pursuing a second language. Also, will help you to pass ASL 1 class in high school or/and college.

What are the requirements?

  • A laptop or mobile phone with camera for recording.

What am I going to get from this course?

  • You will learn the most important elements of ASL grammars.
  • You will learn how to use your body properly while signing.
  • This course's goal is to give you the most effective language-learning experience possible.
  • In the end, you will have the ability in the language that you will be able to use for the rest of your life.
  • This course gives you the full immersion learning the language through no-voice communication. All videos have subtitles.
  • There are grammar and vocabulary development videos are for understanding and using a language.
  • There are Deaf Culture readings links for you to learn more about the community. To learn a language, often it connects to a culture too.
  • Your ability to understand ASL will increase throughout the course with exposure from the native signer as instructor.
  • There are variety of assignments online that will enhance your comprehension of ASL.
  • You will take a video quiz covering a selection of dialogues in ASL. Answer multiple choice or T/F questions about the information given in the dialogues.
  • You will learn: History of ASL, how to identify a shape, name, or number that is same or different, count numbers up to #20, manual alphabet, how to ask yes/no questions and wh-word questions, explain your family background, and over 150 vocabulary.
  • You will two sections that focus on how to describe people and sign sentences that have verb directions.

What is the target audience?

  • This course is also great for anyone who want to be able to communicate with ASL for different reasons.
  • Have a friend, co-worker or family member who is Deaf, learn basic ASL to communicate with them.
  • High School and College students who are now taking ASL 1 class, this course will help you to pass your exam.

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee.

Forever yours.
Lifetime access.

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android.

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section 1: What is ASL
American Sign Language (ASL), Deaf History and Culture
Article
History of ASL
13 questions
Section 2: A-Z, #1-20, & Same or Different
00:40

Watch and copy Erica's handshapes to learn how to sign the A-Z manual alphabet. Repeat if needed. Grab this time to practice your name in fingerspelling.

01:20

Numbers #1-5

Your palm orientation of the hand is backward to your body.

Numbers #6-9

#6 Use your pinkie finger and thumb together, tapped twice

#7 Use your ring finger and thumb together, tapped twice

#8 Use your middle finger and thumb to tap each other twice

#9 Use your index finger and thumb to tap twice

Number #10

Shake your whole hand twice from left to right or right to left

Numbers # 11 & 12

#11 Index finger touch behind the thumb then flip twice

#12 Index and middle fingers' nails touch behind the thumb then flip twice

Numbers # 13-15

#13 Keep your index and middle fingers glued to each other, have your thumb being outside, then flip the 2 fingers twice

#14 Have your thumb closed into the palm, all of rest fingers glued together to flip twice.

#15 Have your thumb being outside of the hand and keep all of your 4 fingers together to flip twice.

Numbers # 16-19

#16 Your pinkie finger & thumb together, shake your wrist twice.

#17 Your ring finger & thumb together, shake your wrist twice.

#18 Your middle finger & thumb together, shake your wrist twice.

#19 Your index finger & thumb together, shake your wrist twice.

Number #20

#20 Your thumb and index finger together to tap twice while having your other 3 fingers closed.

01:28

The goal is for you to be able to tell what is same or different in certain categories.

Vocabulary in this video:

SAME, DIFFERENT, SHAPE, LETTERS, NUMBERS and AGAIN

_________________________________________________

Erica shows you how to sign the various shapes. Copy, follow and learn:

SQUARE, CIRCLE, TRIANGLE, HEART and DIAMOND.

___________________________________________________

Erica signs:

1) 2 HEARTS, SAME SHAPE.

2) TOM TOM, SAME NAME.

3) 6 9, DIFFERENT NUMBERS.

4) EA OA, DIFFERENT LETTERS.

01:28

Practice Fingerspelling:

SASA, SOSO, SESE, STST

ANAN, ENEN, ININ, ONON

TATA, TITI, TOTO, TETE

MAMA, MEME, MIMI, MOMO

04:36

In this video, there are #1-27 questions for your receptive eyes to capture if Erica signs shapes, names, letters, and/or numbers that are same or different.

For example:

Erica signs: Z (in left space) D (in right space)

SAME, DIFFERENT, WHICH?

*If it is different then you sign: DIFFERENT LETTERS!

*If it is same then you sign: SAME SHAPES!

This is an exercise work. Feel free to rewind the video to practice on receptive skills.

01:09

Please watch this quiz video #2 here then answers the true/false questions in next quiz following this lecture, named Quiz 2. Question numbers correspondents with the numbers in this video.

For example:

When you see John signs something (shapes, letters, names, and/or numbers) that is SAME then click on TRUE. If he signs something that is DIFFERENT then click on FALSE.

Same and/or Different (shapes, letters, names, & numbers)
10 questions
00:39

Watch John's Numbers Quiz video here. He signs 4 different numbers, one high near the head, one to left, one to right, and one down, near the stomach. He gives different numbers in those positions for you to figure out which numbers are in which positions. You can write down what you see then submit the answers in the quiz following this lecture, named "Quiz 3 Numbers". Question numbers correspondents with the numbers in this video.

Numbers
4 questions
Section 3: Introductions
02:30

The ASL Vocabulary List that you will see in this video:

  1. YOU
  2. ME
  3. NAME
  4. MY
  5. YOUR
  6. HIS/HERS
  7. WHO
  8. WHAT
  9. WHERE
  10. STUDENT
  11. TEACHER
  12. YES
  13. NO
  14. NOT
  15. DEAF
  16. HEARING (a person who can hear and speak, not Deaf)
  17. HEY
  18. NICE
  19. MEET YOU
  20. TEACH
  21. LEARN
  22. SCHOOL
  23. FINGERSPELLING
  24. OH! I-SEE
  25. EXPLAIN
  26. AGAIN
  27. PLEASE
  28. UNDERSTAND
  29. NOT UNDERSTAND
  30. COLLEGE
  31. UNIVERSITY
  32. SIGN
  33. SIGN LANGUAGE
  34. WHICH
  35. WHY
  36. HAVE
  37. MORE
  38. FINE
  39. CAN
01:21

Grammar Notes:

Wh-Questions (who, why, what, where, when and how) ask for information such as NAME YOU? are signed with the eyebrows squeezed together.

Questions which ask for a "YES" or "NO" answer are signed with the eyebrows raised.

Simple affirmative sentences such as YES. I DEAF I are accompanied by head nodding. For negative sentences such as NO. I NOT TEACHER are accompanied by head shaking. The answers can be answered by repeating the verb from the question.

The sign OH-I-SEE can also be used alone to show that you understand or that you are following what is being said. It is not used for an affirmative response; the sign YES is used for that purpose.

Remember to maintain eye contact with the person you are asking the question.

Culture Notes:

The sign OH-I-SEE can also be used alone to show that you understand or that you are following what is being said. It is not used for an affirmative response; the sign YES is used for that purpose.

In the video:

There is an English subtitle in the video. ASL GLOSS is called when you see all letters and words in CAPITALS because ASL is a visual language, not a written. Therefore, to record what has been signed by using capital letters and words to show that it is not English grammar.

Erica signed in the video: ASL GLOSS below:

FIVE WH AND HOW MUST USE EYEBROWS SQUEEZED. WHO. WHAT. WHICH. WHY. WHEN. WHERE. HOW.

YES/NO QUESTIONS USE EYEBROWS RAISED. EXAMPLES: YOU DEAF YOU? YOU HEARING YOU? YOU WOMAN YOU? SEE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TWO? EYEBROWS SQUEEZED AND EYEBROWS RAISED?

Second part of the video: INTRODUCTIONS with ASL GLOSS

It has ASL GLOSS subtitles.

01:29

This video show you how introductions look like in American Sign Language by using 3 different ways of grammar.

Yes/No Affirmative and Negative Statements examples are below to show the variation:

1) I STUDENT I.

I STUDENT.

STUDENT I.

2) I FROM CALIFORNIA I.

I FROM CALIFORNIA.

FROM CALIFORNIA I.

3) When signing NOT in a sentence then you have to shake your head to represent a negative statement.

I NOT STUDENT.

I NOT STUDENT.

NOT STUDENT I.

_______________________________________________

Erica signed in this video; you can read the ASL GLOSS recorded below.

ASL HAVE 3 WAYS IN GRAMMAR. EXAMPLE SENTENCES "I" CAN PUT FIRST BEFORE SENTENCE OR END-OF-SENTENCE OR IN BOTH SIDES.

EXAMPLE. FIRST: I TEACH. SECOND: TEACH I. THIRD: I TEACH I.

YOUR CHOICE OF 3!

_________________________________________________

There is 2nd part in the video. It is 3 ways in ASL Grammar in actions with Erica and John. They showed how to use 3 ways in dialogue. ASL GLOSS subtitle is included.

_________________________________________________

Last part of the video is about how to ask YES/NO questions with EYEBROWS RAISED then receive affirmative or negative statements. ASL GLOSS subtitle is included.

Section 4: Family and friends
01:53

Vocabulary List:

1) FAMILY

2) MOTHER

3) FATHER

4) SISTER

5) BROTHER

6) DAUGHTER

7) SON

8) NIECE

9) NEPHEW

10) GRANDMOTHER

11) GRANDFATHER

12) AUNT

13) UNCLE

14) COUSIN

15) HUSBAND

16) WIFE

17) CHILDREN

18) ROOMMATE

19) MARRIED

20) DIVORCED

21) SEPARATED

22) SWEETHEART (COUPLE)

23) BOYFRIEND

24) GIRLFRIEND

25) FRIEND

26) GOOD FRIEND

00:33

This video explains how to use ASL for family members and genders. The top half of face (above nose) is used for male signs such as DAD, SON, GRANDFATHER, and UNCLE while the bottom half of face (below nose) is used for female signs such as MOM, DAUGHTER, GRANDMOTHER, and AUNT.

00:21

This video is an example of John asking Erica about her family.

Culture Note:

It is normal to ask if anyone else in the family that is Deaf or can sign. It gives us thesenses how the family bond is like with language access.

00:46

Watch the quiz video here then fill in the blanks in the next section, called "Quiz 4, Quizzes A & B About Family."

1 question

Please write what you comprehended after watching the Quizzes A & B video. Describe A & B's family.

Quiz A:

Quiz B:

Section 5: Describe people
02:49

Vocabulary Lists: Colors, People, Appearances, Clothes, and etc

1) RED

2) ORANGE

3) YELLOW

4) GREEN

5) BLUE

6) PURPLE

7) PINK

8) BROWN

9) BLACK

10) GREY

11) WHITE

12) MAN

13) WOMAN

14) GIRL

15) BOY

16) CLOTHES

17) DRESS

18) SHIRT

19) HAT

20) JACKET

21) GLASSES

22) PANTS

23) SHORTS

24) HAIR

25) EYES

26) NOSE

27) EAR

28) LIPS

29) TALL

30) SHORT

31) BEARD

32) BEAUTIFUL

33) UGLY

34) GOOD

35) BAD

36) APPEARANCE

37) LOOK LIKE

38) RIGHT

39) WRONG

40) THAT

41) NOT YET

42) SHOES

43) SOCKS

44) TIE

45) HOW MANY

46) THINK

Article

Indexing is when you point your index finger at a person who is or isn't in the signing area.

If the person is there/present then you can just point at him/her to mean "HE" or "SHE." It applies to pointing at an object to mean "IT."

If the person is not there/absent then you can identify him/her by spelling or signing his/her name. It applies to "IT" too. Once you have set up a referent, you can refer back to that same point each time you want to talk about that person or object.

00:38

In this video lecture, it shows how to describe people by their physical appearance and clothes.

ASL GLOSS of the video:

#1 Image

SEE POINT-GIRL HAIR BLONDE RED SHIRT.

#2 Image

SEE POINT-BOY BROWN HAIR WHITE SHIRT.

#3 Image

SEE POINT-WOMAN GLASSES GREEN SHIRT.

#4 Image

SEE MAN BLUE SHIRT.

Grammar Note:

Colors (RED, YELLOW, etc.) can appear before or after a noun. Examples: HAIR RED or RED HAIR.

00:35

Watch the quiz video here then answers three questions in the Quiz 5 box: Describe People, Colors and Clothes.

Describe People, Colors and Clothes
3 questions
00:28

This is a fun video to learn how to sign "The Rainbow Colors" song in ASL Rhymes!

Section 6: Verb Directions
00:59

This video is included both ASL and English subtitles. Erica signed how to use certain verbs that give the directions through sign-movement.

Grammar Note:

Some verbs change the direction of their movement to indicate the subject and object of the verb such as in YOU-HELP-ME, I-HELP-YOU, HE-HELP-HER or YOU-HELP-HIM.

Some other verbs that can do this are, not all:

ASK, TELL, SHOW, LOOK-AT, PAY, GIVE, & SEND.

03:08

Watch the Verb Directions quiz video here then pick your answer through multiple choices questions in Quiz 6 section.

Verb Directions
6 questions
Section 7: Self Assessment
Send your ASL video for feedback
Article

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Instructor Biography

Erica has a Bachelor's degree in American Sign Language (ASL) from Gallaudet University and a Master's degree in Bilingual Education: ASL and English from the University of California at San Diego.

Erica has taught ASL courses in a variety of educational settings such as middle school, high school, community colleges and universities.

Not only she grew up with her Deaf parents and grandparents, but she also grew up in an ASL rich environment at Deaf schools.

She teaches ASL online in person, too. See more info on her website:
https://sites.google.com/site/nativeasl

Erica's ASL Literature works can be seen on this website, www.aslized.org, such as "Through the Hands" and "The Great Horned Owl". Furthermore, she can be found on another website, www.spreadthesign.com, as the ASL Dictionary signer.

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