Advanced Writing Strategies for Immediate Improvement
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Advanced Writing Strategies for Immediate Improvement

A course designed to help professionals and students refine their writing skills for professional and academic success.
4.2 (26 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
428 students enrolled
Created by Jake Wolinsky
Last updated 12/2014
English
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Includes:
  • 5.5 hours on-demand video
  • 36 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • By the end of this course, learners will be able to communicate their thoughts in a manner more consistent with the norms of academic and professional writing, and learners will also be equipped with several tools to produce high quality essays in a significantly shorter amount of time.
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • Students who take this course should speak English at a minimum of an intermediate level. All course materials are included within this course.
Description

Advanced Writing Strategies for Immediate Improvement is a comprehensive online guide designed to help provide learners with the writing skills necessary for success in the academic and professional worlds. The course, which is specifically tailored for a completely online learning experience, consists of approximately 40 lectures and dozens of activities to reinforce the concepts discussed in each lecture. This course will take approximately 5-7 weeks to complete, but the actual time will vary depending on the individual learner. Course chapters include detailed explanations of required and optional essay goals and sentence-by-sentence models for various essay types, advanced formal alternatives for common informal vocabulary terms and sentence mechanics, detailed instructions for the usage of advanced punctuation, strategies for identifying and refuting invalid arguments, and methods for reducing subjectivity in essay writing. Chapters also include a model essay demonstrating how each lecture therein can be immediately used.

All course materials are included within this course.

Who is the target audience?
  • This course is designed for online-based students who plan to write significantly within a professional/academic environment or anyone else interested in improving their formal writing ability, and is intended for both native and advanced non-native English speakers.
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Curriculum For This Course
Expand All 38 Lectures Collapse All 38 Lectures 19:03:29
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Course Introduction
1 Lecture 18:21

This lecture explains the different aspects of vocabulary (denotation, connotation, and semantic meaning), how to identify awkward wording, and the importance of identifying the social register of a word or phrase.

Introduction to Advanced Components of Vocabulary
18:21

Word Connotation Quiz
5 questions

Semantic Meaning Quiz
4 questions
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Process Essay Writing Strategies
10 Lectures 01:11:57

This lecture explains commonly required and optional process essay goals and introduces a sentence-by-sentence academically-appropriate process essay model.

Process Essay Format Review and Unit Introduction
11:52

This lecture explains formal academically-appropriate alternatives to the words thing and piece and the specific semantic elements of each vocabulary term.

Vocabulary: Advanced Alternatives to "thing" and "piece"
14:43

Advanced Alternatives to Thing/Piece Vocabulary Quiz
6 questions

This lecture explains the most common academically-appropriate introduction paragraph structure and includes strategies for writing academically-appropriate hooks.

The Anatomy of and Strategies to Expand Introduction Paragraphs
09:01

Identify the hook type for each introduction paragraph.

Hook Type Identification Quiz
4 questions

This lecture explains the most common academically-appropriate body paragraph structure and includes strategies for organizing and expanding body paragraphs..

The Anatomy of and Strategies to Expand Body Paragraphs
10:01

An expanded process essay body paragraph can include:

a. A basic description of the step (Topic Sentence)

b. Specific details of the step

c. How the step contributes to the overall goal

d. Possible alternatives or substitutions

e. Consequences of deviating from the description (such as by using unapproved substitutions)

Read the thesis statement below. Then read each body paragraph and try to identify what paragraph component could be ADDED to expand each paragraph.

Thesis Statement: When trying to persuade academic readers to accept an argument, it is important to clearly explain all relevant background information and data, describe the logic of the proposition, and openly indicate any potential weaknesses or limitations of the logic or data.

Body Paragraph Expansion Quiz
3 questions

This lecture provides a brief introduction of each punctuation mark that will be discussed throughout the duration of this course (semi-colons, colons, em-dashes/double-hyphens, single- and double-quotation marks, brackets, and ellipses).

Review of Existing Punctuation Marks
00:38

This lecture provides an overview of how to use semi-colons in academic writing.

How to Use Semi-colons
08:51

This lecture explains how to use academically-appropriate transitions in combination with semi-colons in formal essay-writing.

Formal Transitions for Semi-Colon Use
06:45

Combine each pair of sentences using a semi-colon + appropriate transition word/phrase + comma construction.

Example:

You see:

Mary has many hobbies. She likes skydiving, painting, and writing.

You Write:

Marry has many hobbies; for example, she likes skydiving, painting, and writing.

Appropriate Transitions Quiz
5 questions

This lecture explains how to avoid beginning sentences with coordinating conjunctions (and, or, so, but, and yet) in academic essays.

Advanced Alternatives to the Coordinating Conjunctions "and/or/so/but/yet"
09:06

For each sentence, fill in the blank with the word additionally, alternatively, consequently, or conversely.

Coordinating Conjunction Alternatives Quiz
4 questions

The last lecture of several chapters of this course will contain an essay sample that demonstrates how the strategies discussed within each chapter can be applied. This lecture provides an explanation of these Before and After Essay Samples.

Explanation of Before and After Essay Samples
01:00

The Before and After Process Essay demonstrates how an informal essay can be enhanced using the writing strategies discussed within the chapter.

Process Essay Writing Strategies Before and After Essay Example
3 pages
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Cause and Effect Essay Writing Strategies
8 Lectures 01:04:48

This lecture explains commonly required and optional cause/effect essay goals and introduces a sentence-by-sentence academically-appropriate cause/effect essay model.

Cause and Effect Essay Format Review and Unit Introduction
10:26

This lecture explains formal academically-appropriate alternatives to the words get, cause, and affect and the specific semantic elements of each vocabulary term.

Advanced Alternatives to "get" and "cause/effect/affect"
18:25

For each sentence, choose the most appropriate word to fill in the blank.

Advanced Alternatives to Get/Cause/Effect/Affect Vocabulary Quiz
6 questions

This lecture consists of an activity to help differentiate the meanings between the commonly mistaken verbs effect/affect and the noun effect.

Effect vs Affect Activity
03:12

This lecture explains the most common academically-appropriate conclusion paragraph structure and includes strategies for writing final essay statements.

The Anatomy of and Strategies to Expand Concluding Paragraphs
04:28

This lecture explains 3 of the most common uses of colons: listing, illustrating/explaining, and introducing a quote.

The 7 Common Uses of Colons Part 1
11:25

This lecture explains 4 additional common uses of colons.

The 7 Common Uses of Colons Part 2
08:42

This lecture--Lecture 18-- explains how to use double-hyphens (also known as em-dashes).

How to Use Double-hyphens
08:10


The Before and After Cause/Effect Essay demonstrates how an informal essay can be enhanced using the writing strategies discussed within the chapter.

Cause and Effect Essay Writing Strategies Before and After Essay Example
5 pages
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Argument Essay Writing Strategies Part 1
6 Lectures 56:02

This lecture explains commonly required and optional argument essay goals and introduces a sentence-by-sentence academically-appropriate argument essay model.

Argument Essay Format Review and Unit Introduction
09:25

This lecture explains how to include conflicting information inside of your argument essay in order to demonstrate objectivity and reliability.

How to Include Conflicting Information
03:45

This lecture explains formal academically-appropriate alternatives to the words good/bad and help/hurt and the specific semantic elements of each vocabulary term.

Advanced Alternatives to "good/bad" and "help/hurt"
11:31

Advanced Alternatives to Good/Bad Vocabulary Quiz
6 questions

This lecture explains the 3 techniques for incorporating outside sources into an academic essay and then provides useful strategies for basic paraphrasing of outside sources.

Introduction to Incorporating Outside Sources
13:28

This lecture explains advanced quotation punctuation including use of [brackets], ...ellipses..., and 'single-quotes'.

How to Use Double-quotes, Single-quotes, Brackets, and Ellipses in Direct Quotes
12:34

This lecture will test your knowledge of advanced quoting punctuation.

Direct Quotation Activity
05:19
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Argument Essay Writing Strategies Part 2
6 Lectures 01:11:41

This lecture will explain how to avoid using first person in academic essays to maintain a sense of objectivity in your writing.

Removing "I" from Academic Essays
13:25

This lecture explains how to distinguish between objective and subjective language and how to reduce subjectivity in essay writing.

Identifying and Avoiding Subjective Language
18:20

For each question, identify the most subjective word.

Identifying Objective Language
5 questions

This lecture explains what to do when information regarding your essay topic is unavailable or simply doesn't exist.

Dealing with Unavailable or Non-existent Information
05:34

This lecture provides advanced strategies for refuting counter-arguments in academic essays.

Refutation Strategies
19:17

This lecture provides an introduction to the concept of argument fallacies and an explanation of how to identify 4 of the most common fallacies.

Common Argument Fallacies Part 1
15:05

Read each argument and identify if it is an example of a Hasty Generalization, Balance Fallacy, Popularity Fallacy, or Confusing Causation with Correlation.

Argument Fallacies Quiz
4 questions

The Before and After Argument Essay demonstrates how an informal essay can be enhanced using the writing strategies discussed within the chapter.

Argument Essay Writing Strategies Before and After Essay Example
6 pages
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GRE Evaluation Essay Writing Strategies
6 Lectures 59:16

This lecture explains commonly required and optional evaluation essay goals and introduces a sentence-by-sentence academically-appropriate evaluation essay model.

GRE Evaluation Essay Format Review and Unit Introduction
19:02

This lecture explains how to appropriately communicate uncertainty in academic essays.

How to Communicate Uncertainty
05:28

This lecture explains how to identify 4 additional common argument fallacies.

Common Argument Fallacies Part 2
12:33

Read each argument and identify whether it is an example of a False Dichotomy, Confusing Lack of Evidence with Falsity, Denying the Antecedent, or Confirming the Consequent.

Argument Fallacies Quiz 2
4 questions

This lecture explains 2 very common academic writing mistakes and simple strategies to avoid them.

Preview 10:17

For each of the sentences below, choose the most appropriate purpose or goal to make the sentence academically appropriate.

Appropriate Usage of "should" Quiz
4 questions

This lecture explains 2 more very common academic writing mistakes including a common transition word error and how to appropriately incorporate figurative language into your essays.

Preview 11:56

For each of the sentences that follow, choose TRUE if for example can be replaced by in fact and FALSE if it cannot.

Distinguishing between "in fact" and "for example" Quiz
6 questions

The Before and After GRE Evaluation Essay demonstrates how an essay can be enhanced using the writing strategies discussed throughout the course.

GRE Evaluation Essay Writing Strategies Before and After Essay Example
6 pages
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Course Conclusion
1 Lecture 00:24

This lecture marks the conclusion the Advanced Writing Strategies for Immediate Improvement Course. Congratulations!

Concluding Lecture
00:24
About the Instructor
Jake Wolinsky
4.5 Average rating
227 Reviews
2,404 Students
2 Courses
ESL Lecturer at an American university Language Academy

I began working in the field of second language acquisition in 2005 as a language assistant for the University of Florida’s Department of Academic Spoken English.During my two years there, I taught various aspects of spoken English (phonetics, sociolinguistics, etc.) to international graduate students from various language backgrounds (Mandarin Chinese, Cantonese Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Thai, Vietnamese, and Spanish). I have also taught English abroad in multiple countries, beginning with a post in Madrid, Spain in 2006. In 2007 I graduated from the University of Florida with Bachelors degrees in Linguistics and Spanish and minors in French and Teaching English as a Second Language. Subsequently, I worked at the Speech & Hearing Clinic at UF as a curriculum designer for a computer program designed to help with accent reduction. After completion of the program, I moved to Taipei, Taiwan, where I worked as an English teacher while studying Mandarin. I eventually returned to the University of Florida to pursue my Master degree in Spanish, where my course work focused on literature, linguistics, and second language acquisition. During my 2-year graduate student career, I taught beginning and intermediate Spanish for the University of Florida.After receiving my M.A., I began lecturing at the University of Florida’s English Language Institute where I taught an extremely diverse student population for more than a year. In August of 2012, I accepted a position teaching at a Chicago university, where I currently teach mainly-advanced level language courses.