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Advanced English Grammar

A course designed to provide learners of English with the advanced grammar skills necessary for professional success.
4.5 (157 ratings)
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1,708 students enrolled
Created by Jake Wolinsky
Last updated 2/2016
English
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Includes:
  • 6.5 hours on-demand video
  • 50 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
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Description

Advanced English Grammar is a comprehensive online guide designed to provide students all over the globe with the grammar skills necessary for success in professional, academic, and social situations in the English-speaking world. The course, which is specifically tailored for a completely online learning experience, consists of more than 50 lectures and dozens of activities to reinforce the concepts discussed in each lecture. This course will take approximately 7-8 weeks to complete, but the actual time will vary depending on the individual learner. All chapters provide a brief review of the basic forms of each topic, which is followed by an introduction and explanation of more advanced or alternate forms that will enable learners to sound more professional, well-educated, and overall more appropriate in their speech and writing.

All course materials are included within this course.

Who is the target audience?
  • This course is designed for intermediate and advanced online English language learners, or anyone else interested in a comprehensive online guide to English grammar.
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What Will I Learn?
By the end of this course, students will be able to communicate their thoughts in a grammatically-precise manner that is appropriate for professional, academic, or informal situations, and students will also have the tools to understand most of the grammar choices of native English speakers of different social groups.
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Requirements
  • Students who take this course should speak English at a minimum of an intermediate level. All course materials are included within this course.
Curriculum For This Course
Expand All 51 Lectures Collapse All 51 Lectures 09:34:36
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Introductory Concepts and Vocabulary
2 Lectures 16:49

This lesson equips students with advanced vocabulary terms that will be used when discussing different seemingly-illogical elements of language.

Preview 13:08

For the questions that follow, choose the most appropriate word for each blank.

Vocabulary Quiz 1
6 questions

This lecture introduces the time-indicating terms T1-T5, which indicate whether a time is in the far past, recent past, right now, near future, or far future.

Introductory Vocabulary Continued: T1-T5
03:41
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Past Time and Tenses
5 Lectures 42:00

This lesson offers an overview of all existing past tenses.

Overview of Past Tenses Introduction
01:54

An overview of the distinctions between the simple past tense, the present perfect tense, and the past perfect tense.

The Simple Past Tense vs. the Present Perfect Tense vs. the Past Perfect
12:00

For each of the sentences below, choose the most appropriate verb form for each blank. Even though the past perfect tense is normally optional, you MUST use the past perfect tense if it is possible.

Possible Tenses:

1) simple past

2) present perfect

3) past perfect

Simple Past vs. Present Perfect vs. Past Perfect Quiz
9 questions

This lecture explains the two situations in which the past progressive is used and how the past perfect progressive tense is ideal for explaining the time difference between two overlapping actions.

The Past Progressive and Past Perfect Progressive Tenses
17:36

For each sentence fill in the blank with the most appropriate form of the verb in parentheses. In situations where there is more than one form is possible, you must choose the most advanced verb form possible (the perfect progressive form > perfect or progressive forms > simple past tense).

Past Tenses Quiz
10 questions

This lecture explains the use of the phrase 'used to' as either a single continuous past action or a past habit. Similarly, the word 'would' is explained as interchangeable with 'used to' as a past habit, particularly with older native speakers.

Preview 06:06

For each sentence, choose TRUE if 'used to' can be replaced by 'would' and FALSE if it cannot be replaced.

Used to vs. Would Quiz
10 questions

This lecture describes how people in the past imagined THEIR futures. Since this tense uses the word 'would', I then proceed to talk about all of the uses of the word 'would' that you will see during the term.

The Future from a Past Perspective
04:24

For each of the sentences below, fill in the blank with the most appropriate verb form. Even though the past perfect tense is normally optional, you MUST use the past perfect tense if it is possible.

Possible Tenses:

1) past perfect

2) past progressive

3) past perfect progressive

4) the past-future 'would'

Final Past Time Quiz
12 questions
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Present Time and Tenses
2 Lectures 18:22

This lecture provides an overview of the contents of this section and subsequently provides a brief review of the simple present tense, the present progressive tense, and the concept of stative verbs, which is a group of verbs that cannot be conjugated with a progressive tense in standard English (though this is increasingly not the case in informal spoken English)

The Simple Present vs Present Progressive Tenses and the Role of Stative Verbs
11:40

Write the simple present or present progressive form of the verb in each blank. Remember, stative verbs cannot be conjugated in the present progressive form in standard English!

Simple Present vs. Present Progressive Quiz
9 questions

This lecture focuses on the conjugation and uses of the present perfect and present perfect progressive tenses.

The Present Perfect and The Present Perfect Progressive Tenses
06:42

Write the most appropriate present tense form of each verb in the blank. The possible tenses are as follows:

1. simple present

2. present progressive

3. present perfect

4. present perfect progressive

Present Tense Quiz
8 questions
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Future Time and Tenses
4 Lectures 27:21

This lecture introduces the concepts discussed in this section, including the two systems of conceptualizing the future (in terms of level of planning or level of certainty) and all future tenses. Subsequently, the future planning system is explained.

Introduction to the Future and the Future Planning System
08:16

Write the correct form of each verb in the blank. The possible verb tenses are as follows:

1. the simple future 'will'

2. 'be going to'

3. the present progressive

4. the simple present

Future Planning Quiz
9 questions

This lecture focuses on the conjugation and uses of the future progressive tense.

The Future Progressive
05:18

The Future Perfect and The Future Perfect Progressive Tenses
07:52

Write the correct form of each verb in the blank. The possible verb tenses are as follows:

1. the simple future 'will'

2. the future perfect

3. the future progressive

4. the future perfect progressive

Future Tenses Quiz
10 questions

This lecture explains the uses of 'will' and 'be going to' in terms of how likely it is believed that a future event might occur. Predictions about the immediate future will also be discussed.

The Future According to Predictability of an Event
05:55
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Article Usage Rules
5 Lectures 24:15

The decision to use an article (a, an, the, or no article) largely depends on whether a noun is count or non-count. This review quiz will help you determine your level of comfort with this concept.

Count and Non-Count Review Quiz
06:13

In this lecture, the concepts of generic (in general), indefinite (not defined), and definite (defined) nouns are discussed and differentiated.

The Concepts of Generic, Indefinite and Definite Nouns
04:05

In this lecture, the uses of articles to indicate whether a noun is generic, indefinite, or definite is explained.

Articles for Generic, Indefinite, and Definite Nouns
06:55

Decide whether each sentence is grammatically appropriate (true) or not (false).

Article Quiz 1
9 questions

This lecture explains additional guidelines for articles usage, including usage for presumably-unique nouns, requirements for all single count nouns, and specific article usage for interchangeable public places.

Additional Article Usage Guidelines
04:45

Decide whether each sentence is grammatically appropriate (true) or not (false).

Article Quiz 2
6 questions

This lecture explains the distinctions between a few/a little and few/little in terms of previous expectation.

A Few vs. Few and A Little vs. Little
02:17

Fill in each blank with 'a few', 'few', 'a little', or 'little'.

A few vs. Few vs. A Little vs. Little Quiz
7 questions
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Gerunds and Infinitives
5 Lectures 31:16

In a phrase with more than one verb, it can be difficult to decide if the 2nd verb (or 3rd) should be conjugated in the gerund or infinitive form. This lecture explains how native English speakers make this determination. The lecture will try to teach you the concept, but only if you try watching it!

Introduction to the Lexical Relationship of Verbs with Gerunds and Infinitives
03:19

This lexically-oriented lecture focuses on two of the most common Group D verbs: remember and forget.

Group D Verbs: Remember and Forget
04:44

In this lecture, the fundamental differences between using a gerund or infinitive after the verbs to stop/quit, to try, and to regret are discussed.

Group D Verbs: Stop/Quit, Try, and Regret
13:27

This activity highlights the importance of remembering whether to use the infinitive or gerund form of a verb immediately following Group D verbs.

Group D Verb Activity
04:45

Fill in each blank with the infinitive or gerund form of the verb in parentheses.

Group D Verbs Quiz
10 questions

This lecture explains the advanced concept of past infinitives and past gerunds. Afterward, you will be glad to have watched it.

Preview 05:01

Fill in each blank with the present infinitive, past infinitive, present gerund, or past gerund form of the verb in parentheses.

Present and Past Gerund/Infinitive Quiz
7 questions
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The 4 Passive Forms
8 Lectures 55:37

This lecture offers an introduction to the 4 passive sentence structures and a comprehensive review of how to form basic passive sentences.

Introduction to Passive Sentences
06:32

This lecture explains in what situations the passive voice is preferable or required.

The 3 Uses of the Passive
03:27

In this lecture, the formation of basic passive sentences is discussed.

A Review of the Basic Passive Form
11:10

This activity demonstrates the usefulness of the passive voice in a professional environment.

Passive Power Plant Activity
03:53

This lesson discusses how to conjugate passive sentences with verb phrases that contain modals.

Modal Passives
04:49

This lecture focuses on the advanced passive form used exclusively with causative verbs (such as get and have).

Active and Passive Causatives
09:19

This lecture introduces the high-advanced THAT- and TO- passive forms. These passive forms are known to be advanced but it is also said that these forms are not too difficult to write.

THAT- and TO- Passives
12:46

This lecture introduces the high-advanced usage of past infinitives with TO-passives. This form is known to have been difficult for learners in the past, but its form and usage are actually very logical.

Past Infinitives with TO-Passives
03:41
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Difficult Adverbs and Adverb Clause Reductions
5 Lectures 58:07

This lecture briefly reviews the 5 adverb types and subsequently expands upon the meanings of relatively-complex adverbs of time.

Introduction to Adverbs and Focus on Adverbs of Time
06:10

For each of the questions that follow, choose the most appropriate answer.

Time Adverbs Quiz
6 questions

This lecture focuses on the often-confused meanings and uses of the adverbs of condition whether or not and even if.

Adverbs of Condition: Whether or not vs. Even if
11:55

This lecture focuses on the distinctions in usage between several adverbs of condition.

Adverbs of Condition
14:52

Write the most appropriate condition adverb in each blank.

Condition Adverb Quiz
6 questions

This lecture introduces the advanced usage and formation rules of reducing adverb clauses into adverbial phrases. After watching this lecture, you will be an expert on the most common adverb clause reduction rules.

Essential Reduced Adverb Clause Rules
17:35

This lecture focuses on two additional adverb clause reduction rules.

Essential Reduced Adverb Clauses Rules Continued
07:35
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Advanced Modal Structure and Uses
6 Lectures 52:58

In this lecture, modal uses and basic modal tenses (including simple present modals, past modals, and present progressive modals) are reviewed.

Review of Modal Tenses
10:53

For each sentence, write the correct tense of the verb phrase.

Modal Tense Quiz
6 questions

This lecture focuses on the important distinctions between modals of necessity, obligation, and expectation.

Modals of Necessity, Obligation, and Expectation
11:13

Read each sentence and decide if the modal indicates necessity, obligation, or expectation.

Modal Quiz 2
5 questions

This lecture focuses on the forms and uses of modals and modal-like expressions of advice, advice with a threat or possibility of consequence, suggestions, and non-obligation.

Modals of Advice, Suggestions, and Non-obligation
07:21

Read each sentence and choose the most appropriate modal for each blank.

Modal Quiz 3
5 questions

This lecture focuses on the distinctions between modals of possibility, ability, and willingness. Additional attention is paid to the easy-to-confuse uses could, couldn't, and can't.

Modals of Certainty (Possibility), Ability, Willingness, and Requests
15:31

Read each sentence and decide what the most likely meaning for each modal.

Modal Quiz 4
6 questions

This lecture focuses on the the form and usage of past progressive modals. You might have been wondering about this tense early, and here it is.

The Past Progressive Modal Tense
03:55

This lecture explains the unacceptability of writing two modals next to each other and alternative terms that can be used instead..

How to Avoid Consecutive Modals
04:05

For each sentence, you will notice two consecutive modals. Your job is to choose the most appropriate re-written verb phrase, replacing the 2nd modal with a non-modal word or phrase. If you are replacing the word 'must', you must write 'have to' in this exercise in order for your response to be marked as correct.

Double Modal Quiz
6 questions
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Conditionals
6 Lectures 32:02

In this lecture, the general concepts of conditionals are reviewed and present and future real conditionals are explained.

Review of the Concept of Conditionals and Expressing Real Conditions
06:09

Write the most appropriate form of each verb in parentheses.

Real Conditionals Quiz
6 questions

This lecture introduces the forms and usage of unreal past, present, and future conditionals.

Expressing Unreal Conditionals and Using Mixed Conditional Patterns
05:48

Write the most appropriate form of each verb in parentheses.

Unreal Conditionals Quiz
6 questions

This lecture focuses on the phrase If only, which is used to indicate a regret or a wish about the past.

Expressing Regret with 'if only'
02:51

This lecture explains the limited usage of the subjunctive mood in English grammar. I wish that every student enjoy this lecture!

Using the Subjunctive to Express Formal Desires or Commands
07:19

Choose the most appropriate form of each verb in parentheses.

Subjunctive Quiz
4 questions

This lecture focuses on how to communicate present and future imaginary effects of unreal past actions.

Mixed Unreal Conditionals
04:07

This lecture focuses on the Inverted Conditional, a grammar pattern that mainly exists in spoken British English. Were you living in England right now, you would hear it frequently! Had you watched the Harry Potter movies recently, you would have noticed it several times!

Inverted Conditionals in Spoken British English
05:48

You will see a standard conditional sentence. Chose the most appropriate re-written condition clause in its inverted form in the blank.

Inverted Conditionals Quiz
6 questions
2 More Sections
About the Instructor
4.5 Average rating
177 Reviews
1,909 Students
2 Courses
ESL Lecturer at an American university Language Academy

I began working in the field of second language acquisition in 2005 as a language assistant for the University of Florida’s Department of Academic Spoken English.During my two years there, I taught various aspects of spoken English (phonetics, sociolinguistics, etc.) to international graduate students from various language backgrounds (Mandarin Chinese, Cantonese Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Thai, Vietnamese, and Spanish). I have also taught English abroad in multiple countries, beginning with a post in Madrid, Spain in 2006. In 2007 I graduated from the University of Florida with Bachelors degrees in Linguistics and Spanish and minors in French and Teaching English as a Second Language. Subsequently, I worked at the Speech & Hearing Clinic at UF as a curriculum designer for a computer program designed to help with accent reduction. After completion of the program, I moved to Taipei, Taiwan, where I worked as an English teacher while studying Mandarin. I eventually returned to the University of Florida to pursue my Master degree in Spanish, where my course work focused on literature, linguistics, and second language acquisition. During my 2-year graduate student career, I taught beginning and intermediate Spanish for the University of Florida.After receiving my M.A., I began lecturing at the University of Florida’s English Language Institute where I taught an extremely diverse student population for more than a year. In August of 2012, I accepted a position teaching at a Chicago university, where I currently teach mainly-advanced level language courses.

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