Your Writing Process
3.9 (56 ratings)
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Your Writing Process

9 Steps to Better Writing
3.9 (56 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
4,676 students enrolled
Created by Scott Kramer
Last updated 4/2015
English
Current price: $10 Original price: $30 Discount: 67% off
1 day left at this price!
30-Day Money-Back Guarantee
Includes:
  • 1.5 hours on-demand video
  • 14 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Understand the process that leads to polished writing for college, business, or personal writing projects.
  • Prewrite to focus writing on a main point
  • Write a working thesis
  • Generate many supporting ideas through brainstorming, mapping, freewriting, and other techniques.
  • Refine and arrange ideas to simplify the drafting process.
  • Revise, edit and proofread to achieve a finished document.
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • Any person can learn to write.
  • It will be essential to have access to a word processing program like Google Documents or MS word.
Description

What students are saying:

"This course by Scott Kramer has been a life saver. In a relatively short course. Scott walks you through a simple writing process and gives you an 'over the shoulder' view of an example throughout the course...I would happily pay for this course. Dare I say, I'm actually starting to enjoy writing now!"--Omar

If you have EVER said that you want to be a better write than this course is perfect for you.

  • Anyone can learn to follow this clearly explained nine-step practice
  • Whatever your writing needs, personal or professional, this course builds confidence.
  • With detailed video explanations, demonstrations, quizzes, and links to supporting resources, Your Writing Process will help you grow as a professional.
  • You can finish this course in under 2 hours and it will change the way you write.

Enroll today and finally become a better writer.

Who is the target audience?
  • New college students
  • Returning adult students
  • Business professionals who harbor doubts about their writing
  • Creative writers who want to return to the basics
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Curriculum For This Course
Expand All 22 Lectures Collapse All 22 Lectures 01:43:16
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Overview of the writing process
1 Lecture 04:06
  1. We begin with the big picture, an overview of the whole writing process.
  2. Each and every technique and strategy is important to practice.
  3. Your goal should be to find out which strategies work best in different situations.
  4. There isn't a single, correct writing process.
Preview 04:06
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Prewriting
7 Lectures 19:27
  1. Whether you are writing a personal bio, taking a position on a controversial issue, developing an article or crafting a proposal for a client, the first step is always deciding on the topic and main idea.
  2. A very brief introduction to Brainstorming, Free writing, Mapping, Journal writing, and others.
  3. You learn which ones are best for different situations.
  4. Take a couple of minutes to listen to the talk.
  5. Go to the resources to study the samples.
  6. Practice.
Preview 02:39

  1. Brainstorming is explained.
  2. Use it to narrow the topic or to generate supporting ideas after writing a working thesis.
  3. Take a couple of minutes to listen to the talk.
  4. Go to the resources to study the samples.
  5. Practice brainstorming.
Preview 03:12


  1. The mapping process is explained.
  2. This technique is excellent for visual learners.
  3. It has a lot in common with brainstorming.
  4. Uses circles and lines to track the thought process and show how ideas relate.
  5. Take a couple of minutes to listen to the talk.
  6. Go to the resources to study the samples.
  7. Practice.
Ideas gathering for the visual learner
01:45

Demo2: Mapping
03:56

  1. Freewriting is explained.
  2. This is the writer's block remedy.
  3. Great for generating supporting ideas for essays, stories, arguments, poems, and articles.
  4. Take a couple of minutes to listen to the talk.
  5. Go to the resources to study the samples.
  6. Practice.
Ready, set, write....and now stop
01:38

  1. Explains how to use a journal, do research or employ (five Ws and an H) questions.
  2. Take a couple of minutes to listen to the talk.
  3. Go to the resources to study the samples.
  4. Practice.
3 more great prewriting strategies
02:43
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Prewriting: supporting ideas
9 Lectures 48:30
  1. Decide on the topic and main idea of this writing.
  2. Develop a working thesis that will help you stay focused as you generate support.
  3. Understand the parts of the thesis: Topic and Main Idea.
  4. Take a couple of minutes to listen to the talk.
  5. Go to the resources to study the samples.
  6. Practice.
A thesis does the heavy lifting
03:22

Demo3: Working Thesis
03:27

  1. Return to the prewriting strategies: Brainstorming, Freewriting, Journal Writing, Research, Mapping, and others.
  2. Use them to gather support for thesis.
  3. Support might be facts, descriptions, narratives, personal experiences, quotes from research, data, statistics, reasons, and examples.
  4. Shoot for 25-30 main points and support details.
  5. Turn your internal editor off and gather as many raw ideas as possible.
  6. Take a couple of minutes to listen to the talk.
  7. Go to the resources to study the samples.
  8. Practice.
Supporting that point
03:45

Demo4: Support Brainstorm
02:41

Demo5: Support Mapping
05:19

Demo6: Support Freewrite
06:53

  1. When you have at least 25-30 raw ideas it is time to decide what will work.
  2. Go back to the working thesis and think about each idea and how they relate to it.
  3. Drop ideas that are off topic.
  4. Add new ideas that may come up as you see areas that are missing support.
  5. There are times when a great idea comes up that will make you rework your thesis.
  6. Take a couple of minutes to listen to the talk.
  7. Go to the resources to study the samples.
  8. Practice.
Boiling it down to the best
04:16

  1. From the best supporting details, cluster together groups of 3-5 related ideas.
  2. These will become sentences and paragraphs.
  3. Now look at each list and put numbers or letters to arrange the best order of paragraphs.
  4. Take a couple of minutes to listen to the talk.
  5. Go to the resources to study the samples.
  6. Practice.
Gather and gear up for draft
03:43

Demo7: All the steps before the draft
15:04

Answer the questions. If you get any wrong please return to the designated talk to brush up on the material.

Quiz #1: Prewriting
5 questions
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The draft
1 Lecture 04:29
  1. Not expected to sit in front of a blank computer screen and write slowly for many painful hours.
  2. The secret of a first draft is quick and easy.
  3. It is simply a transcription of your pre-writing.
  4. Take each cluster and expand on them to a write rough sentences and paragraphs.
  5. The trick is keep moving forward.
  6. If you can't think of a word or you are not happy with a sentence structure just make a mark in the margin to return during revision.
  7. When you are finished your first draft do not begin revision.
  8. Stop everything you are doing and now take a break.
Demystifying the draft
04:29
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The key to good writing
3 Lectures 07:35
  1. Focus on the content.
  2. Print out your writing.
  3. Read it out loud with a pen in hand.
  4. Mark anything that sounds weird or awkward. If something seems off-topic, or a paragraph seems to be missing something make a note to revise it.
  5. Go back to the computer to fix every mistake or solve any questions.
  6. Read each fix out loud to be sure it sounds right and relates to the main point.
  7. Your revision does not finish until the writing communicates exactly what you want it to say.
Revision
03:04

  1. Now that the document's ideas are perfected, it is time to fix any and all writing errors.
  2. Print out your writing.
  3. Read it out loud with a pen in hand.
  4. Mark anything that might be a misspelling, faulty punctuation, a grammar or style issue, or a sentence writing error.
  5. Go back to the computer to fix every mistake or solve any questions.
  6. Continue to read out loud to test each solution.
  7. Feel free to access a writing handbook if you doubt your knowledge of a grammar rule.
  8. Editing does not finish until the writing is near perfect.
Editing
02:35

  1. This is the final essential step in the process.
  2. It takes real patience.
  3. In order to polish your writing, you will need to read it over many times (at least 5).
  4. Each read you will find different errors to fix.
  5. I usually spread this process over a day or two.
Proofreading
01:56
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An Important Final Point
1 Lecture 01:09
  1. Through a steady practice, it is time to see which techniques work best for you.
  2. Return to the tried and true techniques that you like.
  3. You may ignore certain steps of the process for some writing situations.
  4. Slowly develop your own tricks and shortcuts.
  5. In the end, we all develop our own writing process
  6. You will no longer sit at a blank computer screen and struggle to write.
Personalizing the process and the conclusion
01:09

Answer the questions. If you get any wrong please return to the designated talk to brush up on the material.

Quiz #2: Draft and Reworking
5 questions
About the Instructor
Scott  Kramer
3.9 Average rating
56 Reviews
4,676 Students
1 Course
Educator, Writer and eLearning Evangelist

In 1997, Scott graduated with distinction from Northern Arizona University, receiving a Masters of Arts in Creative Writing. For over a decade, he has taught college courses in composition, creative writing, script writing, reading skills, literature, pop culture, and career development.

Now Scott is developing blended curriculum, using cutting-edge educational technology to teach people writing and the creative process. He is committed to helping students learn to grow as people and professionals.