Working Operations Management Problems

This course will show you how to work the many problems encountered in a typical operations management college course.
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  • Lectures 88
  • Contents Video: 9 hours
  • Skill Level All Levels
  • Languages English
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About This Course

Published 4/2014 English

Course Description

This course shows you how to work every single problem you are likely to encounter in an introductory operations management / production management course at either the undergraduate or graduate level. It is designed for a student taking a college course in operations management (sometimes called production management) who is struggling with the problems. Anyone taking an APICS certification course will also find these tutorials helpful.

There are over 80 different tutorials and over seven hours of content. The topics covered include forecasting, inventory management, aggregate planning, master production scheduling, material requirements planning, quality control, control charts, project planning, assembly line balancing, location planning, precedence diagrams, stopwatch time studies, and simple waiting lines.

The course has a video tutorial on each type of problem with at least two examples of each time of problem. Each video covers all the steps in great detail. Nothing is skipped or glossed over.

Each type of problem is covered in a separate video tutorial. The tutorials are grouped into meaningful modules. This allows you to take just those tutorials you need to be successful in your college course.

What are the requirements?

  • A basic understanding of statistics.

What am I going to get from this course?

  • By the end of the course, you should be able to perform all the basic calculations in operations management. These include productivity, breakeven analysis, efficiency, processing requirements, number of kanban cards, yield, and learning curves.
  • By the end of the course, you should be able to perform all the forecasting problems in operations management. These include simple moving averages, weighted moving averages, simple exponential smoothing, trend-adjusted exponential smoothing, simple regression, multiple regression, seasonal forecasts, MAD, MAPD, MSE, tracking signals, and control charts.
  • By the end of the course, you should be able to perform all the assemble line balancing problems in operations management.
  • By the end of the course, you should be able to perform all the work design problems in operations management.
  • By the end of the course, you should be able to perform all the location planning problems in operations management.
  • By the end of the course, you should be able to perform all the control chart problems in operations management. These include forecasting error terms, x-bar, R, P, and C charts.
  • By the end of the course, you should be able to perform all the quality control problems in operations management. These include process capability ratio, process capability index, system availability, and system reliability.
  • By the end of the course, you should be able to perform all the inventory management problems in operations management. These include basic EOQ, production EOQ, EOQ with quantity discounts, EOQ reorder point, fixed order period, inventory turns, ABC classification.
  • By the end of the course, you should be able to perform all the aggregate planning problems in operations management.
  • By the end of the course, you should be able to perform all the material requirements planning problems in operations management.
  • By the end of the course, you should be able to perform all the waiting line problems in operations management.
  • By the end of the course, you should be able to perform all the project management problems in operations management.

What is the target audience?

  • College students (undergraduate or graduate) taking a course in Operations Management or Production Management
  • Anyone needing a review of operations management techniques.

What you get with this course?

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30 day money back guarantee.

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Lifetime access.

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android.

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section 1: Introduction
02:35

A brief introduction to the instructor and to the course.

02:12

A listing of the major topics covered in this course.

Section 2: Basic Calculations
00:54

This section has a variety of small topics, like breakeven analysis, productivity, and learning curves, that are too small to be grouped into their own sections. Think of this as the miscellaneous section. Most likely, your textbooks has these topics scattered across a number of chapters.

05:48

In this tutorial, we will see how to calculate productivity. Productivity is a measure of how effective a company uses its resources.

02:59

In this tutorial, we will see how to compute the quality-productivity ratio; also known as the QP ratio.

09:15

In this tutorial, we will see how to perform breakeven analysis. Breakeven analysis is also known as cost-volume analysis.

09:22

In this tutorial, you will learn how to calculate a break even dollar volume when multiple products are involved.

07:43

This tutorial will review the use of the z-table; also known as a standard normal table. The tutorial will not cover all aspects of a z-table. That is for a business statistics course. Rather, it will cover those aspects that are typically used in operations management.

02:52

In this tutorial, we will see how to calculate efficiency as well as a related measure called utilization. Both measure how well a facility is being used.

02:55

In this tutorial, we will see how to calculate processing requirements. Processing requirements is a way of calculating how many machines are required to produce the number of products required.

02:11

In this tutorial, we will see how to calculate the number of Kanban cards that are required.

05:49

In this tutorial, we will see how to calculate process yield and understand yield management.Process yield is the actual yield after defective items are reworked. Yield management is a way of maximizing revenues, or yield, from a service.

01:58

In this tutorial, we will see how to evaluate shipping alternatives to see if the cost of faster shipping is offset by lower inventory holding costs.

11:11

Each time cumulative production doubles, the total manufacturing time and cost fall by a constant and predictable amount and this is the bases of learning curves. In this tutorial, we will see how to perform learning curve calculations.

Section 3: Forecasting
02:06

This section will cover a variety of forecasting techniques and related topics. These include simple and weighted moving averages, simple and trend-adjusted exponential smoothing, regression, seasonality, and measures of forecast quality.

04:12

In this tutorial, we will see how to calculate simple moving averages. These are used both to smooth data and to forecast one period into the future.

07:41

In this tutorial, we will see how to calculate weighted moving averages. These are used both to smooth data and to forecast one period into the future.

12:18

In this tutorial, we will see how to calculate simple exponential smoothing forecasts. This is the first true forecasting technique we will look at.

03:53

There are two different approaches to trend adjusted exponential smoothing. This section introduces trend adjusted exponential smoothing and briefly describes the two approached. Each approach is then described in detail in a separate video.

16:42

In this tutorial, we are going to see how to perform trend adjusted exponential smoothing using method one. If you have not done so, please view the introductory video first.

17:33

In this tutorial, we are going to see how to perform trend adjusted exponential smoothing using method two. If you have not done so, please view the introductory video first.

01:25

This tutorial is a brief introduction to simple regression forecasting.

06:22

In this tutorial, we will see how to perform simple regression forecasting with the correlation coefficient, intercept, and slope given. Later tutorials will show how to calculate these values.

04:59

In this tutorial, we will see how to find the intercept, slope, and correlation coefficient for a simple regression forecast using a calculator.

02:02

In this tutorial, we will see how to find the correlation coefficient, intercept, and slope using Excel formulas.

04:12

In this tutorial, we will see how to perform regression using the Excel Data Analysis ToolPak. The resulting printout will give us the correlation coefficient, intercept and slope.

09:27

In this tutorial, we will see how to perform a multiple regression forecast with the intercept, slopes, and correlation coefficient given to you.

02:43

In this tutorial, we will briefly introduce seasonality. Seasonality is when demand varies up-and-down period-by-period due to external factors such as the seasons of the year.

06:42

In this tutorial, we are going to see how to deal with seasonality in forecasting using the annual method. If you have not done so, please view the introductory video first.

19:38

In this tutorial, we are going to see how to deal with seasonality in forecasting using the period-by-period method. If you have not done so, please view the introductory video first.

04:18

In this tutorial, we are going to see how to deal with seasonality in forecasting using the period-by-period method. If you have not done so, please view the introductory video first. Additionally, this video is slightly longer than 20 minutes and Udemy does not allow videos to exceed 20 minutes so it has been split into two parts. This is Part II.

11:25

In this tutorial, we will see three measures of forecast quality, the mean absolute deviation or MAD, the mean squared error or MSE, and the mean absolute percent error or MAPE.

02:10

There are two different approaches to calculating the tracking signal. This section introduces the tracking signal and briefly describes the two approached. Each approach is then described in detail in a separate video.

19:59

In this tutorial, we will see how to compute the tracking signal using the standard approach. This is the approach used by most textbooks. If you have not done so, please view the introductory tutorial first.

12:53

In this tutorial, we will see how to compute the tracking signal using the approach used in the Operations Management textbook by William J. Stevenson. This is not the approach used by most textbooks. If you have not done so, please view the introductory tutorial first.

03:32

In this tutorial, we will take a quick look at control charts. We will not look at how to construct them, that will be covered in later tutorials. Rather, we will see what they are made of.

05:35

In this tutorial we will see how to use a control chart to monitor a forecast for errors or bias. Please watch the overview of control charts tutorial before watching this tutorial. You should also review the tutorial on measures of forecast quality before watching this tutorial as the mean square error from that tutorial is used here.

Section 4: Assemble Lines
06:24

In this tutorial, we will see how to draw precedence diagrams. Precedence diagrams will be used both for assembly line balancing and for project management.

10:01

In this tutorial, we will see how to perform assembly line balancing. Assembly line balancing is the process by where tasks are assigned to workstations on an assembly line. Please review the precedence diagram tutorial before watching this tutorial.

Section 5: Stopwatch Time Study
05:23

In this tutorial, we will see how to find number of observations required for a stopwatch time study.

03:38

In this tutorial, we will see how to find the standard time once a stopwatch time study has been completed.

Section 6: Location Planning
04:00

In this tutorial, we will see how to perform the center of gravity method of location planning.

05:40

In this tutorial, we will see how to compare multiple sites using factor ratings.

04:10

In this tutorial, we will see how to compare multiple production facilities using locational cost-profit-volume analysis. Locational cost-profit-volume analysis only considers the fixed and variable costs for each location.

05:57

In this tutorial we will see how to use a heuristic to try and minimize either transportation cost or transportation distance within a plant.

03:17

In this tutorial, we will see how to locate departments within a facility based on a Muther grid. This is a grid of how important or unimportant it is for departments to be close to one another.

Section 7: Quality Control
03:32

In this tutorial, we will take a quick look at control charts. We will not look at how to construct them, that will be covered in later tutorials. Rather, we will see what they are made of.

04:34

In this tutorial, we will introduce the control charts that are used for quality control. Please review the control chart overview tutorial before continuing with this tutorial.

06:31

In this tutorial, we will briefly review averages, the range, and standard deviations. This review will be brief since these topics should have been covered in a statistics course. We are reviewing them because they are the basis of x-bar, range, and S-control charts.

04:27

In this tutorial, we will see how to develop an X-bar chart and S-chart when the standard deviation is given.

03:21

In this tutorial, we will see how to develop an X-bar chart and R-chart when the standard deviation is not given and we must use the range.

03:35

In this tutorial, we will see what happens to x-bar charts when they are constructed using out-of-control data.

07:40

In the control chart tutorials, we hinted at finding patterns in the data points and how a pattern could indicate a process being out of control. In this tutorial, we will formalize that by looking at two runs tests for patterns in the data.

04:42

In this tutorial, we will see how to develop a p-chart. P-charts are used to monitor the proportion, or percentage, of defective items generated by a process.

03:00

In this tutorial, we will see how to develop a c-chart. C-charts are used to monitor the number of defects per item.

06:35

In this tutorial, we will see how to compute the process capability ratio and the process capability index.

01:49

In this tutorial, we will see how to calculate system availability.

03:53

In this tutorial, we will see how to compute series, parallel, and system reliability.

Section 8: Inventory Management
01:12

In this section, we will look at all aspects of inventory management.

07:46

In this tutorial, we will see how to use the ABC inventory classification.

03:40

In this tutorial, we will see two ways to measure inventory cost, the total cost of inventory and the total stocking cost of inventory.

06:35

In this tutorial, we will see how to perform the calculations related to the basic economic order quantity model.

06:13

In this tutorial, we will see how to perform the calculations related to the production economic order quantity model. Note that this tutorial builds off of the basic EOQ tutorial so be sure to watch that tutorial first.

06:40

In this tutorial, we will see how to handle quantity discounts with fixed holding costs.

04:40

In this tutorial, we will see how to calculate quantity discounts with variable holding costs. This tutorial builds extensively off of the fixed holding cost tutorial so it is critical that you view that tutorial before viewing this one.

08:47

In this tutorial, we will see how to calculate the reorder point for the economic order quantity models. Note that this applies to the basic EOQ model, the production EOQ model and the EOQ model with quantity discounts.

04:15

In this tutorial, we will see how to calculate the reorder quantity for the inventory that is ordered using a fixed time period models. This is also known as a fixed order interval model.

03:58

In this tutorial, we will see how to compute the inventory turnover ratio and days of supply. The inventory turnover ratio is better known as inventory turns or just turns.

Section 9: Aggregate Planning
02:29

In this tutorial, we will briefly introduce aggregate planning.

01:17

In this tutorial, we will review the form we will be using for aggregate planning.

11:11

In this tutorial, we will introduce the cost calculations for aggregate planning.

07:50

In this tutorial, we will see a second example of the cost calculations for aggregate planning.

10:18

In this tutorial, we will see how to schedule production in aggregate planning using the level strategy. This is also known as the inventory strategy.

05:54

In this tutorial, we will see how to schedule production in aggregate planning using the chase strategy.

05:37

In this tutorial, we will briefly explore using a hybrid strategy in aggregate planning.

08:01

In this tutorial, we will see how to find the master production schedule and compute available to promise.

Section 10: Material Requirements Planning
03:37

In this tutorial, we will briefly introduce material requirements planning or MRP.

09:20

In this tutorial, we will see how to complete the enhanced MRP planning grid discussed in the introduction.

15:24

In this tutorial, we are going to look at three additional lot sizing algorithms. We will also see how to compare the cost of the various approaches to lot sizing.

06:22

In this tutorial, we will see how to handle allocated inventory and safety stock in the MRP calculations.

11:03

In this tutorial, we will see how to put multiple MRP planning grids together to plan all of the components needed to manufacture a particular product. It is essential that you complete all the other MRP tutorials before starting this one.

Section 11: Waiting Lines
04:24

In this tutorial, we will briefly introduce waiting lines. Waiting lines are also known as queues.

04:27

In this tutorial, we will see the calculations for the simplest waiting line, a system with a single line and a single server.

03:44

In this tutorial, we will see how to work with the single-server waiting line model with constant service time. This tutorial builds extensively off of the single-server exponential service time model so it is critical that you view that tutorial first.

05:36

In this tutorial, we will see how to work with the multiple-server waiting line model. This tutorial builds extensively off of the single-server exponential service time model so it is critical that you view that tutorial first.

Section 12: Project Management
03:04

In this section, we will review basic project management. Please review the precedence diagram tutorial before watching this tutorial.

07:40

In this tutorial, we will see how to use project planning diagrams to find the early start time, early finish time, late start time, late finish time, slack, and free slack for each activity.

04:05

In this tutorial, we will see how to replace the single time estimates for project completion times with probabilistic estimates.

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Instructor Biography

Ronny Richardson, Professor of Operations Management

I have a Ph.D. in Operations Management from Georgia State University. I teach Operations Management at both the graduate and undergraduate level at Kennesaw State University. I have been teaching Operations Management for 25 years, both in a classroom and online.

I have published one Operations Management textbook and I have worked with textbook publishers at McGraw-Hill and Wiley to produce support material for various other Operations Management textbooks.

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