International Politics Mastery: Western Security and Russia
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International Politics Mastery: Western Security and Russia

Speak confidently about international security relations between the West and Russia, including history and present.
3.1 (4 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
431 students enrolled
Last updated 7/2017
English
Curiosity Sale
Current price: $10 Original price: $60 Discount: 83% off
30-Day Money-Back Guarantee
Includes:
  • 1.5 hours on-demand video
  • 1 Supplemental Resource
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Assignments
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Speak confidently about international security relations between the West and Russia, including history and present.
  • Educate others about international security and Russia, beyond what's covered in the news.
  • Understand competing explanations of why the relations between the West and Russia are bad.
  • Link historical examples going back to the inter-war period with the current situation concerning the West and Russia.
  • Understand how a relatively unimportant country of Poland may have contributed to the conflict in Ukraine.
  • Recognise the importance of the EU and NATO security strategies for how those organisation see Russia.
  • Speak confidently about brilliant theorists and thinkers and link their ideas to current events.
  • Understand the Western as well as the Russian perspective on the current security situation.
  • Speak in terms of strategies and ideas, not just describing what happened and who was involved.
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • You should be familiar with the basic concepts of International Relations, such as Cold War, European Union, European integration, NATO or liberal democracy.
  • You should be open to learning more advanced material, which focuses on ideas, and not just on people and events, like most news on the Internet.
  • You should be open to learning perspectives different from your own. This is good for broadening your horizons. You don't have to embrace them.
Description

From the author of the best-selling course International Politics Mastery: Become an Expert Analyst

In this course, you will learn to speak confidently about dilemmas and challenges facing the relations between the West and Russia.

By the end of the course, you will become an expert on the security situation facing the United States, the European Union, NATO and Russia. The ideas I discuss in this course are timeless. 

By knowing them, you will become more confident in your understanding and interpretation of what’s happening between the West and Russia.

Linking history and present

In this course, I will take you on an exciting journey beginning between the two world wars, when the relationship of Russia with the United States and Europe was hotly debated. 

As early as in 1926, one influential advocate of European integration argued that Russia was a threat. A few years later another influential thinker responded that European integration would only make things worse and lead to more conflicts. 

We will then discuss how those early divisions are still relevant today, and we can see them in international responses to the conflicts in Georgia and Ukraine. I will also share with you my own views on the conflict between the West and Russia.

This course is not about 'the news' and events

So what exactly is this course about? It is about international security and Russia, of course, but it is not really about policy events and actions. You can learn what is happening from reading the news on the Internet and that way you can stay very well informed. 

This course is about something you will not easily find on the Internet. It is about some fundamental ideas about international security and Russia. 

To simplify, most of the things we take from the news are events. And most of the things we take from the books, expert magazines and journals, are about ideas. 

Policy leaders, conflicts and different agreements and disagreements, they change all the time. And you can take all this information from the Internet. But the ideas I am about to teach you in this course, they are timeless. 

They concern the fundamental questions, such as:

  • Who is mainly responsible for the conflicts between the West and Russia? 
  • Is it the expansionist European Union and NATO? 
  • Or, is it aggressive Russia, which cannot accept that it is no longer a super power? 
  • How should the West organise itself and respond to the Russian challenge? 
  • Should Europe become more integrated, more like a super state? 
  • Or, should it seek cooperation with Russia? 
  • How could such cooperation look like? 
  • How would Russia like to reorganise the Western security system?

These are precisely the questions of ideas. When you learn the answers to those questions, you can then easily take any event, such as the conflict in Ukraine or the war in Syria, and apply your knowledge to expertly analyse those problems. 

Your knowledge will be supported by decades of research and idea exchanges between some of the greatest intellectuals. Are you excited?

What you will get in this course

At the end of your course, you will be able to:

  • Speak confidently about international security relations between the West and Russia, including history and present.
  • Educate others about international security and Russia, beyond what's covered in the news.
  • Understand competing explanations of why the relations between the West and Russia are bad.
  • Link historical examples going back to the inter-war period with the current situation concerning the West and Russia.
  • Understand how a relatively unimportant country of Poland may have contributed to the conflict in Ukraine.
  • Recognise the importance of the EU and NATO security strategies for how those organisation see Russia.
  • Speak confidently about brilliant theorists and thinkers and link their ideas to current events.
  • Understand the Western as well as the Russian perspective on the current security situation.
  • Speak in terms of strategies and ideas, not just describing what happened and who was involved.

With the 30-day full money back guarantee, there is no reason why you should not enrol right now and try out the course. If you decide it’s not for you, you will get all your money back.

Who is the target audience?
  • Individuals interested in the problems of international politics, particularly those who regularly watch the news, read newspapers or follow on-line media.
  • Commentators, bloggers and journalists covering international politics and international security.
  • Students of Politics and International Relations who want to consolidate their knowledge of international security and Russia
  • Policy practitioners who want to improve their analytical skills and better understand the problems of international security and Russia.
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Curriculum For This Course
13 Lectures
01:27:52
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Introduction
1 Lecture 08:40

In this video, you will learn why I’ve created this valuable course, what exactly you will learn by completing it, and I will also tell you a little bit about myself. 

Preview 08:40
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The Causes of Security Problems with Russia
2 Lectures 14:08

The relations between the West and Russia have never been great, but they have been particularly bad in recent times. Why is that? Whose fault is it? In this narrative, Russia, over the years, has become dangerously expansionist. In spite of long-standing efforts by the EU and NATO to develop closer ties with this country, Moscow has chosen the path of authoritarianism domestically, and territorial revisionism in Russia’s so-called ‘close neighbourhood’

Preview 06:35

In this video, we are going to discuss the alternative explanation of the deteriorating relations between the West and Russia, and the impact it has on international security. This alternative explanation is the exact opposite of the first one. It is not Russia’s domestic autocratic system, or its imperialism, which are responsible for the conflicts in Georgia or Ukraine. Instead, the main fault lies with the Western states, and particularly with the policies of the European Union and NATO.

The Expansion of the EU and NATO
07:33

This is quiz for the section The Causes of Security Problems with Russia

Quiz for The Causes of Security Problems with Russia
7 questions

This is assignment for The Causes of Security Problems with Russia
Assignment for The Causes of Security Problems with Russia
3 questions
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The West Must Unite Against Russian Threat
5 Lectures 34:41

The idea that Russia is a threat to international security is very old. If Russia is such a threat, how should Europe respond? Long before the creation of NATO in 1949, there were already ideas that Europe must unite in order to prevent the Russian militaristic imperialism. Right after the end of World War One in 1918, a European Count Richard Coudenhove-Kalergi was the first famous advocate of European integration against Russian threat. 

Coudenhove-Kalergi and the Idea of Pan-Europe
06:50

In this video, we are going to discuss another influential thinker, who envisaged the international union of liberal democratic states before the process of European integration began. By 1939, it was clear that European unification was impossible in the short term. This does not mean that there were no calls to bring Europe together for security and peace. This is when Clarence Streit, an American journalist, published his pamphlet called Union Now. He articulated his argument loud and clear: a Federal Union of the North-Atlantic democracies is needed as soon as possible, entailing integration in government and citizenship, defence, trade, money, postal and communication services.

Clarence Streit and the Union of Liberal Democracies
06:48

After the Second World War, we enter the period of the so-called Cold War, which lasted until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. This video will not be discussing the events of the Cold War because you are probably already familiar with them. If not, you can easily find out how the Cold War unveiled. What I would like to focus on here, is the intellectual background of the Cold War. We will look into the so-called Long Telegram – a document submitted from the US embassy in the Soviet Union back to the American State Department in February 1946.

George Kennan and the Containment of the Soviet Union
06:34

In this video, we are going to discuss a unique perspective on the problem of international security involving Europe and Russia. In this perspective, it is not the West, which has been so much pursuing the policy of expanding its boundaries towards the East. Instead, it have been Central European countries, most notably Poland, which have been pulling Ukraine towards the West and the West towards Ukraine. There is a lot of evidence suggesting that on occasions when Europe actually took Ukraine seriously, it was mainly due to the realpolitik-driven activity of the countries like Poland. Poland did not join the cause of the Western liberal pushing towards Ukraine – it created and consistently implemented the policy of pulling the West towards Ukraine and vice versa, often to the annoyance of the Western capitals. It has been doing so because its elites believe that only European Ukraine would ensure the security and existence of Poland in the long term.

Jerzy Giedroyc and Poland's Strategy in the East
07:47

In this video, we are going to look into so-called security strategies of the European Union and NATO. Most countries have some kind of a strategy, which guides their international security policy. What you may not know is that some international organisations also have security strategies. The EU and NATO have in fact codified security strategies, adopted by all member states, which you can access on their websites. What we are interested in is how those organisations define their security agenda concerning relations with Russia.

Western Security Strategies and Russia
06:42

This is quiz for the section The West Must United Against Russian Threat

Quiz for The West Must United Against Russian Threat
6 questions

This is assignment for The West Must Unite Against Russian Threat
Assignment for The West Must Unite Against Russian Threat
3 questions
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The West Must Include Russia in Its Security System
4 Lectures 24:46

In this video, we are going to learn about one of the first critics of the European Union, David Mitrany. In fact, Mitrany criticised the EU long before it actually existed! How is that possible? Well, he criticised the idea of states forming regional, closed unions. In the 1930s, this idea of a closed, regional union was mainly represented by this vision of Pan Europe, as developed by Coudenhove-Kalergi. We already talked about it. Mitrany was a famous critic of this idea, of Europe forming a federal union against external threats. He thought it would lead to more competition and more conflicts, only at the regional, not national level.

David Mitrany: The Critic of Regional Unions
07:11

Another famous intellectualist who criticised European integration long before the actual launching of the European integration project was an Austrian classical economist and ardent anti-socialist, Ludwig von Mises. He advanced his criticism in his book Liberalism in the Classical Tradition, which was published in 1927. So, it was already after Coudenhove-Kalergi announced his vision of creating the Pan-European Union. Mises actually found it understandable that Europeans would like to emulate American economic success, especially by removing destructive barriers to free trade. Misses liked the idea that European states would like to enable tariff-free international trade. But limiting such an arrangement to Europe would require, according to Mises, to ‘demonstrate that the interests of the Portuguese and the Rumanians, although in harmony with each other, both collide with those of Brazil and Russia’.

Ludwig von Mises: The Critic of European integration
04:23

Now that we established some criticism of creating exclusive regional unions such as the EU, let’s consider how could the system of European security be reorganised so that it is more stable and offers Russia a more significant role. 

Cooperating Peacefully through Concentric Circles
06:44

At this point, you know that there are voices calling for reorganising the Western security system and for giving Russia an equal position in that system. The question you may have now is whether any of those ideas were ever close to being implemented. Well, not really. There were numerous attempts for forging closer links between the EU and NATO on the one hand, and Russia on the other hand. Russia, as it turned out, has been increasingly suspicious of those organisations, and instead, it has started promoting its own vision of the European security order. The closest to actually learning some details of this proposed new system was in 2008 when then-Russian President Dmitry Medvedev outlined those ideas during his speech in Berlin.

Dmitry Medvedev and a New European Security Order
06:28

This is Quiz for The West Must Include Russia in Its Security System

Quiz for The West Must Include Russia in Its Security System
6 questions

This is assignment for The West Must Include Russia in Its Security System
Assignment for The West Must Include Russia in Its Security System
2 questions
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Conclusion and My Take on the Problem
1 Lecture 05:37

At this point of the course, you are an expert in the problem of international security and Russia. You know what the problem is about and you have a comprehensive understanding of ideas on how to deal with it. 

In this video, I want to share a few words of my own take on the problem. 

My Take on Western Security and Russia
05:37
About the Instructor
Kamil Zwolski, PhD
4.5 Average rating
63 Reviews
2,250 Students
3 Courses
Associate Professor in International Politics, UK

I'm Associate Professor in International Politics at the University of Southampton, UK, which is in the top 1% of universities worldwide. I am also Fellow of the UK’s Higher Education Academy, which promotes teaching excellence. 

My passion is to research and teach the most important problems of International Relations, which I have been doing for over 10 years now. I have been working at universities in Manchester, London and Southampton, UK. I have also conducted extended research at the European Union headquarters in Brussels, and the United Nations headquarters in New York.

My on-line courses will give you concrete knowledge and skills to understand and speak about most problems of international politics with confidence.

The content I am teaching is 100% backed-up by the decades of research in the field of International Relations, and it cannot be replaced with watching and reading the news in newspapers and magazines.

Remember: facts are NOT knowledge, understanding and ability. That's why, through my courses, I urge you to stop following world news all the time, and start educating yourself in order to understand the world.

If you are open to new knowledge and skills, and if you want to speak confidently about most problems of international politics, enroll in the course.

You have a 30-day money back guarantee if you decide it's not for you. Plus, I am regularly adding new content so that you can stay on top of the most recent research to expand your skills. So check out my course and enroll today.

More About Me

It's funny, but my passion for international politics started already in the kindergarten, when I was only a few years old. One day my friend gave me a large, colorful political map of the world. It had different colors for each country, and I found it captivating. I am not sure where he got it from, but I loved! 

This interest stayed with me and shaped my life choices. In 2006, I graduated with my BA and MA in Political Science, receiving competitive Scholarship of the Polish Ministry of Education. In 2007, I graduated with MA European Studies from the University of Maastricht, Holland, also with the Scholarship of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

In 2007, after securing Full Scholarship, I began my PhD study in the European Studies Research Institute, University of Salford, UK. I graduated in 2011, and in 2013 I published my first book, concerning the role of the European Union in international security. 

Since 2012, I have been working at the University of Southampton, and I continue to develop my passion for research and teaching. I am currently working on my second book, which concerns European - Russian relations following the recent conflict in Ukraine. My research articles are published regularly in some of the world's leading academic journals. 

I teach hundreds of students every year, and in 2015 my efforts were recognized with a prestigious Vice-Chancellor’s Teaching Award for innovation in teaching international politics. I am always friendly and approachable for my students, because admire everyone open to learning new knowledge and skills.