Vocal Vibrations from the Heart

Learn and Instinctive and Technological Approach to Singing.
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Instructed by Kathleen Perry Music / Vocal
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  • Lectures 32
  • Length 3 hours
  • Skill Level All Levels
  • Languages English
  • Includes Lifetime access
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    Available on iOS and Android
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About This Course

Published 11/2014 English

Course Description

All sound comes from Vibrations or waves transmitted and heard within our body.. I believe if we approach our vocal instrument in that manner we can allow our instincts to come forth. Learning to feel the sound throughout our bodies or be the sound. All humans have music instincts from the heart and the brain. For example we are born with the rhythm of our heartbeat and then the imagination from the brain can stimulate our emotions in song. The Audio keyboard as well as the vibrations of our body can help us find exactly where those vibrations of sound are coming from then with the physical, mental and technical information we are able to put that knowledge together and go back to that place within our bodies always to repeat a wonderful vocal sound and gain more confidence. Practice and self motivation will allow you to remember exactly where that physical, emotional and audio point of sound was placed in you vocal cavity. I have included vocal exercises for you to help tap into that physical space. The videos take you step by step into the physical and mental side of singing. .After I learned the technical side I started to rely more on what I was feeling the vibrations of sound and how the breath and the shapes I was making with my vocal cavity, lips, tongue and jaw affected the sound I was producing. Also my state of mind. Music changes your state of mind. I then began to measure the sound vibrations diagnosing where it came from. I learned to balance the breath stream with the point of contact in my vocal cavity, hard palate to repeat the sound over and over again. These sound vibrations began to tell me who I was as a singer, all the colors of my voice and how I could adjust them as needed. I feel the student who takes this course will want to sing technically and instinctively to become more intelligent as a singer and begin to rely more on their own body instincts and emotions. I believe they can discover more of their own voice and bring more of the inner voice out.

What are the requirements?

  • My one requirement is that the student find a quiet place to practice without distractions, a mirror to see his body movements and focus as finding ones own inner voice requires a large amount of mental concentration, listening to the subtle, slight movements of your audible inner keyboard. Also students must bring a willingness to learn, talent, dedication, patience and be open-minded. The vocal exercises are included for practice. Of course it is always helpful for a singer to own a keyboard/piano. The knowledge of some basic music theory such as reading notes of the keyboard, what is a scale? What are the major keys? What is a measure? However it is not necessary to complete this course. But sometimes you just want to practice singing that one note or one interval and having a piano always helps.

What am I going to get from this course?

  • At the completion of this course the student will be able to determine his/her vocal range. The student will learn how to create a balanced sound by learning the physical anatomy of his vocal instrument. They will be able to locate or pinpoint where the vibrations of sound are created within their body. These mental and physical connections will allow the student go back and locate that wonderful sound again and again. Learn how to deep breathe from the diaphragm to create a balanced breath stream. The course will teach vowel formations and color to control focus and placement and create great resonance of sound. This course can help the student mentally and physically find their register change to use their entire voice or tonal qualities. In song interpretation the student will learn the importance of selecting repertoire and as a singer how to tell the story.

What is the target audience?

  • This course is meant for most students who are unable to connect the dots between the physical side of tone production to the mental side of tone production. The goal of this course is to bridge the gap so that students can re-create a great tone consistently.

What you get with this course?

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Curriculum

Section 1: Introductions and Determining your Vocal Range/Type/ Classification MF
02:00

Singing is tone we find in the resonances and vibrations of ones own body. Every person’s tonal quality will be different from the others based on gender, musical culture, how your body is shaped, life experiences and much more.

Let’s learn to begin to think of our voice as vocal instruments; an instrument that is very similar to wind instruments. We create tone through the balance of breath; visual imagery; audio; listening with our mind not just our ears; vocal technique and spiritual intuitions. Singing is like a science, experimenting is required for a physical and mental balance.

09:38

This is an overview of Female vocal ranges/classifications. The vocal range/classification you are singing in today will only be a beginning point. It will develop as you grow in vocal knowledge, age and experience . Let’s simply determine how high and high low you can sing right now.

9 minutes (9:38)

12:12

This is an overview of Male vocal ranges/classifications. The vocal range/classification you are singing in today will only be a beginning point. It will develop as you grow in vocal knowledge, age and experience . Let’s simply determine how high and high low you can sing right now.
7 minutes (7:26)

How to receive your Voice Critique/Feedback
1 page
Section 2: Anatomy of your Vocal Instrument and Breath Control
07:49

Learn how to produce a great vocal sound through mind and body connection. The recognition of the physical and mental keys of your vocal instrument and how it works. Let's distinguish which parts of your body will help you produce the creative sounds you hear in your head.

7 minutes (7:48)

06:24

Learn how to create an even breath stream or column of air for sustaining notes to achieve a balanced vocal tone and a firm foundation.

6 minutes (6:24)

Section 3: Breathing and Breath Control
08:07

Step-by-Step instruction on how to take a singer’s breath. Lower Diaphragmatic Breathing. Learning to work towards using a minimum of air to achieve a maximum of tone. "Compression-compressed air - air that has been compressed within some type of chamber or container so that it can exert expansive force" ....Macmillan Dictionary for students



8 minutes (8:07)

09:22

Learn Strength building exercises for Breathing and Breath Control. Diaphragm Push Up is a favorite.

After watching the video, choose your vocal range and work on the Self-Practice Vocal Exercises in this section.
If you are unsure of your vocal range, please refer to Lectures 2 or 3 'Determining Your Vocal Range'

9 minutes (9:22)

03:20

[Audio Lesson] These diaphragm push-up exercises are in 5 vocal ranges: Bass, Baritone, Tenor, Alto, Soprano. These exercises will help strengthen your diaphragmatic breathing to gain more awareness and control of diaphragm muscles.

The more control of this muscle, the better you can control the flow of air through your wind pipe to create an improved balance of vocal sound.

02:31

[Audio Lesson] These diaphragm push-up exercises are in 5 vocal ranges: Bass, Baritone, Tenor, Alto, Soprano. These exercises will help strengthen your diaphragmatic breathing to gain more awareness and control of diaphragm muscles.

The more control of this muscle, the better you can control the flow of air through your wind pipe to create an improved balance of vocal sound.

03:12

[Audio Lesson] These diaphragm push-up exercises are in 5 vocal ranges: Bass, Baritone, Tenor, Alto, Soprano. These exercises will help strengthen your diaphragmatic breathing to gain more awareness and control of diaphragm muscles.

The more control of this muscle, the better you can control the flow of air through your wind pipe to create an improved balance of vocal sound.

02:47

[Audio Lesson] These diaphragm push-up exercises are in 5 vocal ranges: Bass, Baritone, Tenor, Alto, Soprano. These exercises will help strengthen your diaphragmatic breathing to gain more awareness and control of diaphragm muscles.

The more control of this muscle, the better you can control the flow of air through your wind pipe to create an improved balance of vocal sound.

02:52

[Audio Lesson] These diaphragm push-up exercises are in 5 vocal ranges: Bass, Baritone, Tenor, Alto, Soprano. These exercises will help strengthen your diaphragmatic breathing to gain more awareness and control of diaphragm muscles.

The more control of this muscle, the better you can control the flow of air through your wind pipe to create an improved balance of vocal sound.

02:43

In the beginning when you begin lower diaphragmic breathing it may feel uncomfortable or that you are not getting enough air, because you are comfortable with raising your chest upward to intake air instead of expanding the lower ribs side to side , horizontally , and expanding the trunk of your body front and back, It will feel look you are buidling a foundation of air. of which you are doing so. to lay the sound upon. The from that point you must learn to contol the release of the air.

2 minutes (2:43)

Section 4: Vowel Articulation
05:29

Learn how to sing on the vowel. When we sing we must shape the sound physically and mentally. Learn the physical form and structure and gain strength.

5 minutes (5:29)

02:43

It is important to keep the physical position of the vowel once you have shaped the position that creates the ultimate level of good sound. Mentally you must photograph these various positions.

2 minutes (2:43)

09:39

Let's study the specifics description and execution of the vowel sounds. EE AY AH OH OO

9 minutes (9:39)

04:18

The pure sound of Medial AH encompasses words such as Mask, laugh, dance, that require widening the sides of your tongue! Also it encompasses a diphthong. AH-IH for the vowel I. This one requires a lot of mental shaping and listening to the audio sound you create to physically execute.

4 minutes (4:18)

Summary - vowel articulation
00:52
Section 5: Focus and Placement
05:38

The vibrations of sound come alive within your vocal cavity and hard palate. A balanced compressed air breath stream will allow to feel and then know where to place the sound and create vivid Harmonic Overtones on the vowel. For example feeling your head tone placement versus your chest tone placement and your mixed voice.

5 minutes (5:38)

03:44

[Audio Lesson] These Focus and Placement exercises are in all 5 vocal ranges: Bass, Baritone, Tenor, Alto, Soprano. The use of the consonant "T" followed by the vowel sounds, Too Toe Tah Tay Tee, will help us measure our hard palate keyboard for the placement of our low, medium and high vocal ranges. These Vocal exercises will help you obtain a more consistent accurate placement of quality tone.

(03:44)

03:23

[Audio Lesson] These Focus and Placement exercises are in all 5 vocal ranges: Bass, Baritone, Tenor, Alto, Soprano. The use of the consonant "T" followed by the vowel sounds,Too Toe Tah Tay Tee, will help us measure our hard palate keyboard for the placement of our low, medium and high vocal ranges. These Vocal exercises will help you obtain a more consistent accurate placement of quality tone.

(03:23)

03:06

[Audio Lesson] These Focus and Placement exercises are in all 5 vocal ranges: Bass, Baritone, Tenor, Alto, Soprano. The use of the consonant "T" followed by the vowel sounds,  Too Toe Tah Tay Tee, will help us measure our hard palate keyboard for the placement of our low, medium and high vocal ranges. These Vocal exercises will help you obtain a more consistent accurate placement of quality tone.

(03:06)

02:41

[Audio Lesson] These Focus and Placement exercises are in all 5 vocal ranges: Bass, Baritone, Tenor, Alto, Soprano. The use of the consonant "T" followed by the vowel sounds,  Too Toe Tah Tay Tee, will help us measure our hard palate keyboard for the placement of our low, medium and high vocal ranges. These Vocal exercises will help you obtain a more consistent accurate placement of quality tone.

(2:41)

03:32

[Audio Lesson] These Focus and Placement exercises are in all 5 vocal ranges: Bass, Baritone, Tenor, Alto, Soprano. The use of the consonant "T" followed by the vowel sounds,  Too Toe Tah Tay Tee, will help us measure our hard palate keyboard for the placement of our low, medium and high vocal ranges. These Vocal exercises will help you obtain a more consistent accurate placement of quality tone.

(3:32)

Section 6: Register Change
07:00

First learn to recognize where your voice is changing. Learn to listen to all the colors of your voice. Learn to relax over those register changes from low chest tone to medium mixed voice and high head tone.

7 minutes (7:00)

05:44

[Audio Lesson] Running scales is a very good way to hear all the sounds or parts of your voice. Imagine you are a piano keyboard moving higher in vocal tone and then lower on each note within the scale. Look in the mirror as you do these exercises. Are you raising your head as you do these exercises, trying to reach for the sky? That would be incorrect.

Keep your head comfortably erect or look straight-ahead and your shoulders down with chest relatively flat. Do not reach for the tones with your vocal cavity or head. Remember to lower your jaw as you climb up the scale. Lessen the air stream/pressure, or you might not be forming the vowel correctly with your teeth, tongue and jaw if your voice cracks.

Practice to find the balance of air or vocal breath stream that will allow you to climb the scale with an open throat, like yawning and without tightness in the jaw or straining. There should be no feeling of stress throughout your body.

(05:44)

05:11

[Audio Lesson] Running scales is a very good way to hear all the sounds or parts of your voice. Imagine you are a piano keyboard moving higher in vocal tone and then lower on each note within the scale. Look in the mirror as you do these exercises. Are you raising your head as you do these exercises, trying to reach for the sky? That would be incorrect.

Keep your head comfortably erect or look straight-ahead and your shoulders down with chest relatively flat. Do not reach for the tones with your vocal cavity or head. Remember to lower your jaw as you climb up the scale. Lessen the air stream/pressure, or you might not be forming the vowel correctly with your teeth, tongue and jaw if your voice cracks.

Practice to find the balance of air or vocal breath stream that will allow you to climb the scale with an open throat, like yawning and without tightness in the jaw or straining. There should be no feeling of stress throughout your body.

(05:11)

05:56

[Audio Lesson] Running scales is a very good way to hear all the sounds or parts of your voice. Imagine you are a piano keyboard moving higher in vocal tone and then lower on each note within the scale. Look in the mirror as you do these exercises. Are you raising your head as you do these exercises, trying to reach for the sky? That would be incorrect.

Keep your head comfortably erect or look straight-ahead and your shoulders down with chest relatively flat. Do not reach for the tones with your vocal cavity or head. Remember to lower your jaw as you climb up the scale. Lessen the air stream/pressure, or you might not be forming the vowel correctly with your teeth, tongue and jaw if your voice cracks.

Practice to find the balance of air or vocal breath stream that will allow you to climb the scale with an open throat, like yawning and without tightness in the jaw or straining. There should be no feeling of stress throughout your body.

(05:56)

05:33

[Audio Lesson] Running scales is a very good way to hear all the sounds or parts of your voice. Imagine you are a piano keyboard moving higher in vocal tone and then lower on each note within the scale. Look in the mirror as you do these exercises. Are you raising your head as you do these exercises, trying to reach for the sky? That would be incorrect.

Keep your head comfortably erect or look straight-ahead and your shoulders down with chest relatively flat. Do not reach for the tones with your vocal cavity or head. Remember to lower your jaw as you climb up the scale. Lessen the air stream/pressure, or you might not be forming the vowel correctly with your teeth, tongue and jaw if your voice cracks.

Practice to find the balance of air or vocal breath stream that will allow you to climb the scale with an open throat, like yawning and without tightness in the jaw or straining. There should be no feeling of stress throughout your body.

(05:33)

07:12

[Audio Lesson] Running scales is a very good way to hear all the sounds or parts of your voice. Imagine you are a piano keyboard moving higher in vocal tone and then lower on each note within the scale. Look in the mirror as you do these exercises. Are you raising your head as you do these exercises, trying to reach for the sky? That would be incorrect.

Keep your head comfortably erect or look straight-ahead and your shoulders down with chest relatively flat. Do not reach for the tones with your vocal cavity or head. Remember to lower your jaw as you climb up the scale. Lessen the air stream/pressure, or you might not be forming the vowel correctly with your teeth, tongue and jaw if your voice cracks.

Practice to find the balance of air or vocal breath stream that will allow you to climb the scale with an open throat, like yawning and without tightness in the jaw or straining. There should be no feeling of stress throughout your body.

(07:12)

Section 7: Song Interpretation
11:15

Are you truthful to your audience when you sing? Learn how to diagnose or examine the song lyrics and make them your own. Find your own voice.

  1. Include an audience participation song. The audience loves to jion in singing.
  2. Remember to look the part if the song is happy or high energy, smile and move that body!
  3. Choose your performance songs wisely. Know your audience do not pick a Hip Hop song for an Opera audience.
  4. Make sure you know the melody line of the song. It is impossible to change a song when you are not sure of the original melody.
  5. Be confident!
  6. Don't forget to have FUN!

11 minutes (11:15)

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Instructor Biography

Kathleen Perry, Vocal Coach

Kathleen PerrySinger/Vocal Coach

For over four decades, Kathleen Perry has developed a solid and devoted following locally and internationally. Now residing in Las Vegas, NV. with her husband Drummer/Percussionist Arthur Perry. They continue to teach and produce beautiful music together.

"I was very fortunate that I grew up in the San Francisco bay area," says the three-octave range versatile singer, " All the great singers and musicians came there to perform. I remember attending great concerts of Aretha Franklin at the Fillmore West, Frank Sinatra, Miles Davis, McCoy Tyner, Patti Labelle, and Etta Jones, Gladys Knight. They were my teachers before I started studying forcefully.

I began my music career playing classical piano at the age of 7 and performing with the Gospel youth choir at McGee Avenue Baptist church in Berkeley CA. Performing throughout my youth for many radio shows, fashion shows, government conventions and school productions. During this time encouraged by my elementary school principal I entered a talent contest sponsored by a group called "The Limeliters." The Limeliters were a famous folk group of the fifties recording on RCA Victor records. I won the contest and recorded my first album with the Limeliters titled "Through Children's Eyes" at the age of 10 singing with the youth choir.

I vigorously pursued my musical career attending San Francisco State University " majoring in music and psychology. At twenty-one I began to perform in California bistros, bars, clubs and halls the list would fill pages. I married my husband Arthur a well-known drummer and the son of a Baptist Minister. We can proudly say we have been together now for 41 years! Arthur and I produced, directed and performed in a musical jazz revue in 1970 titled "Freedom in my Soul" after our original composition. Opening to notable revues from the San Francisco Examiner at the Encore Theater in San Francisco. During that time our home was the place known in San Francisco’s as the famous Haight Ashbury district a place for many musical jam sessions. It was a musical nirvana with many drop in performances by the likes of jazz giants like Bobby Hutcherson, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Mongo Santamaria, Ray Drummond, to name just a few. My husband Arthur and I appeared at many memorable San Francisco jazz clubs and restaurants. Most Jazz music aficionado's world wide recognize Enricos, Rolands, The Cypress Club, Milestones, Washington Square Bar and Grill, Harris' Restaurant, and The famous IronHorse Jazz Club which turned into a four year engagement. Also we performed at the annual Union Street Fair and the Ironhorse Jazz festival, KGO radiothon as special guest artists and " West Coast Live " a worldwide radio broadcast.

I continued to study Voice privately with Claudine Spindt and Cynthia Bythell.

We continue to perform the Arthur & Kathleen Perry Quintet headlined "First Night Monterey" appearing before 12,000 people at the 1994 New Years Eve celebration. During this time I was honored when requested to sing the Star Spangled Banner at Kesar Stadium for the opening of the Rugby games. I was honored to sing at Golden Gate Fields to honor the famous racehorse jockey now deceased Mr. Bill Shoemaker.

In 1991 The Arthur & Kathleen Perry Quintet was invited to perform in Europe. This changed our lives. Our first appearance was at Villa Florio in Palermo Sicily. Our relationship with the wonderful European audiences never ended. We toured throughout Europe performing in Cathedrals, Famous Villas, Jazz clubs and concert halls from 1991 to date. "As a vocalist I never stop enjoying the European audiences" They are true lovers of American music and they seem to always respect my distinct flare to sing jazz, R&B and Gospel." During this time I was able to perform with the great Jazz artist Lee Konitz. While in Europe I was fortunate to be able to share my vocal techniques teaching at the Scoula Popolare Di Musica, for The Brass Group of Italy, One of our great gospel concerts was held at the Cathedral of San Gerlando in Agrigento Italy for RAI television. It was a benefit for the children of Bosnia in 1994 that due to popular request of the Italian people has been aired annually at the Christmas season.

Kathleen Perry recorded "Bounasera Misilmeri, Live in Europe" with Italian jazz greats Vito Giordano, Ricardo LoBue and Diego Spitaleri.I had the great pleasure in 2002 to sing with the great Italian jazz vibraphonist Enrico Randisi at the first Windsurf World jazz festival sponsored by ESPN in Mondello, Italy. On September 11, 2002 The Kathleen Perry Quintet was honored to perform for the International Red Cross and Papiacomunicare in Castigilone delle Stiviere, Italy. "Per non dimenticare" was the theme "Let us not forget" dedicating the night to the victims of September 11th. The Arthur & Kathleen Perry Quintet also was requested to perform for the Provincia of Brescia during this period for the annual International World Celebration 2002 for the "Year of the mountains" In 2004 performing at Villa Lampedusa Jazz Festival. In 2010 I returned to Palermo Sicily hosting vocal Seminars for many private companies.Recently, I have worked on several soundtracks for the Las Vegas Underground films festival. I was the Associate musical Director and Vocal Coach for thefilm "Siren” with a cameo appearance featuring a song composed by Arthur Perry and myself titled "Starting Over". In November 2011 the Kathleen Perry Jazz band appeared in the Addison’s Lounge for the Rampart Casino of Las Vegas.

I am passing on the knowledge learned throughout the years opening a private school for Vocal technique in Las Vegas for the past 13 years. Teaching the new up and coming talented singers

Like most Artist, I am continually a work in progress. Always desiring to create the best sound possible, perfecting my vocal instrument. Music is a life's work.

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