Urban Zoology: Crows
0.0 (0 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
3 students enrolled
Wishlisted Wishlist

Please confirm that you want to add Urban Zoology: Crows to your Wishlist.

Add to Wishlist

Urban Zoology: Crows

Mirror, Muse, and Sentinel
0.0 (0 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
3 students enrolled
Created by Erica Hansen
Last updated 5/2017
English
Current price: $12 Original price: $25 Discount: 52% off
4 days left at this price!
30-Day Money-Back Guarantee
Includes:
  • 1 hour on-demand video
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion

Training 5 or more people?

Get your team access to Udemy's top 2,000 courses anytime, anywhere.

Try Udemy for Business
What Will I Learn?
  • Learn about the historical view of crows and its reflection in society.
  • Understand the culture of crows including group behavior and crow language.
  • Comprehend the presence of the crow in an urban environment, and deterrents and extermination.
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • You should be able to use a PC at beginner level.
  • An interest in animal science would be an advantage.
  • You should be open-minded about topic concerning the subject.
Description

This session covers the most widely recognized ancient texts and mythical history related to Crow Culture, as well as the top researchers and theorists in the field of Crow Ecology and design in relation to urban ecosystems. This course contains a discussion of crow behaviors, crow rhyme, and how to be aware of preservation in the urban ecosystem. Urban adaptations in the crow behavior is presented. Design is discussed in relation to how it can be influenced by “wild” creatures.

Who is the target audience?
  • Individuals who are interested in animal science.
  • Professionals in the similar field who want to learn new things about the subject.
Compare to Other Urban Zoology Courses
Curriculum For This Course
+
Start with Lecture 1
11 Lectures 59:23



Crows: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
04:21

Ancient Descriptions and Contemporary Analysis
05:56

Ravens' Knowledge
02:48

The Culture of Crows
02:45

Crow Language
06:23

The Sentinel
08:05

Current Trends in Corvid Research
06:06

Cultural Co-evolution
09:18
About the Instructor
Erica Hansen
3.7 Average rating
3 Reviews
10 Students
6 Courses

Erica Hansen is an artist and ecologist, currently working in Southern Italy. The previous two were spent as an artist-in-residence at The Creative Alliance in Baltimore, MD. She completed her BFA at the Maine College of Art in 2000, with a double major in painting and sculpture. In 2008, she completed her MA in Arts and Education at the Maryland Institute College of Art. She is currently pursuing a practice based PhD through the Socially and Ecologically Engaged Practice.

She describes her approach to art making as an investigation of shared human experience through immediate subject matter and materials. Erica describes herself as a spectator, a scientist, and a sieve. Her work is a conversation between herself, her audience, and the world as a usable substance.

Erica has worked as a holistic educator and arts program coordinator for 15 years. She specializes in cross-discipline collaboration and 21st century art-making practices. Currently, she has focused on wilderness art education and ornithological studies as they apply to at-risk student populations.

Her current body of work examines visible, invisible and psychological structures of human culture in relation to bird culture. Working primarily in photo, video and sculpture she creates visual experiments that exist in between physical space, mythological history, and personal desire.

"Art objects are temporal marks on the landscape, indicative of our impact, but also our minuteness in the history of the earth."