Know your product

Evan Kimbrell
A free video tutorial from Evan Kimbrell
Founder of Sprintkick | Ex-VC | Ex-startup founder
4.4 instructor rating • 22 courses • 591,251 students

Learn more from the full course

Modern Copywriting: Writing copy that sells in 2021

Learn how to strategically deliver words that get people to take action using the art and science of copywriting.

07:07:25 of on-demand video • Updated March 2021

  • What copywriting is and what you need to know to do it effectively
  • How to gain a thorough understanding of your audience, competition, products, and your brand’s unique voice
  • Copywriting tactics including structure, persuasion, emotion, power words, clarity, and more
  • Proven copywriting formulas that remove the guesswork from writing
  • The differences between B2B and B2C copywriting and how to craft B2B copywriting most effectively
  • How to write headlines that draw people in and get them moving down the rest of the page
  • Copywriting tactics for specific types of projects, including landing pages, CTAs, email, social media, videos, and much more
English Hey guys, welcome back to the course. Okay, so now that we know what copywriting is, we can move on to discussing a couple of marketing fundamentals Okay, so now that we know what copywriting is, we can move on to discussing a couple of marketing fundamentals and how they affect your copywriting process. In this lecture, we're going to walk through the importance of knowing your product, and that's more than just knowing the name of it. What does your product mean to your customers, how does it affect their lives, and how can you use all of that information to attract more of them? Henry Ford, of Ford automobile fame, didn't trust anyone who salted their food before tasting it. Think about it. Someone goes through all that effort to craft something delicious, and the first thing you do is change the way it tastes. Diabolical. So if you're writing copy to sell your product, you'd better, let's say, use the right ingredients and cook up accurate and compelling copy. I'm talking about headlines, descriptions, and basically a bunch of promises. You want to ensure the people who decide to try your product don't end up with indigestion or are otherwise unsatisfied. You want to ensure the people who decide to try your product don't end up with indigestion or are otherwise unsatisfied. So how can you get to know your product? Well, this calls for some good old fashioned research, unfortunately. Not only do you need to understand what your product is on a surface level, but also what its features and benefits are. In fact, we should take a moment here actually to highlight the differences between what a feature is and what a benefit is. Now, in case you didn't know that there is a difference, or what the difference is, a feature is something that describes your product's appearance or capability. Color options, screen size, storage space - those are all examples of features. Now, a benefit, on the other hand, shows how it's useful to the reader or the customer. Saving time, making money, more relaxing - on the other hand, shows how it's useful to the reader or the customer. Saving time, making money, more relaxing - those are examples of benefits. Now, while features can add to the value of the product, it's really the benefits that truly make a customer want to buy it. The company that hosts your website offers 24-hour customer service. That's a feature. What's a more convincing way to write this? No matter what time it is, or where you are in the world, That's a feature. What's a more convincing way to write this? No matter what time it is, or where you are in the world, there's always someone available to offer you support for troubleshooting or technical issues. Now, that might be a little bit wordy, but it's a lot more convincing than just saying 24-hour customer service. Now, that might be a little bit wordy, but it's a lot more convincing than just saying 24-hour customer service. But how do we go further in expressing the benefit of the said feature? Someone will always be there for you. Great. Dig a little bit deeper. You can rest at night knowing that if your site crashes, we'll fix it with 24/7 phone and chat technicians on standby. 24-hour customer service focuses on a feature, and the latter focuses on a benefit. In this case, ease of mind, convenience, and being able to relax. People often can't tell the difference between a feature and a benefit. An easy way to make sure you've written a benefit is to ask, "So what?" after each sentence. An easy way to make sure you've written a benefit is to ask, "So what?" after each sentence. Let's take a look at the virtual reality headset company Oculus Rift. I don't know if you guys are in my product management class, but I make fun of them considerably. Regardless, Oculus, if you haven't heard of this before, they're the company that makes those ridiculous headsets and it was bought by Facebook for like a billion dollars, it's really just a screen you put on your eyes that's in the shape of a helmet, and it allows you to kind of engage with whatever video game or virtual reality you're looking at. that's in the shape of a helmet, and it allows you to kind of engage with whatever video game or virtual reality you're looking at. It says that they enable the sensation of presence, the feeling as though you're actually there. Okay, let's play our old game. So what? What does that mean for me at the end of the day? The copy seems to answer that with "The magic of presence changes everything." "You've never experienced immersion like this." Okay, again, so what? The second half of the copy doesn't state benefits. You can argue that it generates curiosity, but "you'll never be bored again" is a benefit. "The magic of presence. Rift's advanced display technology combined with its precise, low latency constellation tracking system enables the sensation of presence, the feeling as though you're actually there. The magic of presence changes everything. You've never experienced immersion like this." Now, the feature is its advanced display technology and its tracking system. Why do these features exist? Well, to make you feel like you're really there. How does this connect to human desire, or what is the benefit? "The magic presence ... never experienced this." How does this connect to human desire, or what is the benefit? "The magic presence ... never experienced this." Well, that isn't exactly like in your face benefits, but people desire it because they'd love the hottest tech, they get to show it off, brag about it, you know. tech, they get to show it off, brag about it, you know. So what's in it for them? Well, they probably never experienced this before, and well, that's a new experience. It's worth noting that if you work for a B2B company, where you sell directly to companies and not individual consumers, where the features themselves are the selling points, well, conveying the benefits of those features could be pointless or often insulting. They don't really have to explain benefits to companies that already know which features deliver the benefits they need. They don't really have to explain benefits to companies that already know which features deliver the benefits they need. They probably already know what they're looking for and what makes or breaks their final decision. That's not just something like price. It could be that it comes down to something just like who has the higher resolution. Again, higher resolution is not a benefit, it's just a feature. higher resolution. Again, higher resolution is not a benefit, it's just a feature. higher resolution. Again, higher resolution is not a benefit, it's just a feature. But of course, that's not always true. A lot of B2B businesses use benefit based messaging as well. Udemy for Business, for instance, promises - you can read this right on their website - access and intuitive learning product and enabling employees to learn skills anytime, anywhere, any device. Regardless, a rule of thumb says that you should place less emphasis on features and more on underlying benefits, since benefits are connected to desires, and desires activate purchases. We'll learn how to recreate desire later in the course, but for now just remember that your readers are pretty much just selfish people. They're going to wonder, "What's in it for me?" and you need to provide an answer, and you need to do it very quickly. If you don't immediately see the benefit of your product, that's perfectly fine. and you need to do it very quickly. If you don't immediately see the benefit of your product, that's perfectly fine. Try asking yourself three simple questions. Number one, why does this feature exist? What was the purpose of adding it? UpWork connects freelancers with businesses that need their skills, and features What was the purpose of adding it? UpWork connects freelancers with businesses that need their skills, and features a built-in payment feature. Why does that built-in payment feature exist for a company that matches freelancers to companies? Well, the built-in payment feature allows freelancers to easily invoice businesses and get paid more quickly, and it allows businesses to securely send their payment through the UpWork system, and it allows them to dispute the money if there is ever an issue with the freelancer. It's all about convenience and it's all about security. The second question you should ask yourself is, how does this connect to human desire? What would the driving impulse to buy this possibly come from? ADT offers security systems for businesses, and a key feature is video surveillance and storage. "Watch over your company with HD video and store your footage on the cloud or on-site." How does this connect to human desire exactly? Well, business owners need to feel safe and secure, so being able to watch over your business offers some kind of peace of mind. HD footage and cloud storage take that security even further. Easier to see what's happening, and then the cloud makes it less of a hassle to store all that information. Now, the third question you should ask yourself is, what's in it for the customer? The Weight Watchers' Beyond the Scale program is designed to help you not only lose weight, but also score benefits that go beyond seeing a smaller number on the scale. Weight Watchers, if you haven't guessed, is a diet program. So what's in it for the customers of Weight Watchers? Well, Weight Watchers know some clients focus solely on losing pounds, sometimes at the expense of their overall health and well-being. This program offers a more balanced way to achieve health and happiness through proper diet, fitness technology, and psychology. This program offers a more balanced way to achieve health and happiness through proper diet, fitness technology, and psychology. If you still can't figure out what your product benefits are, whatever you do, do not just make them up. There's a famous ad man named Bill Bernbach, I don't know if I'm saying it right, but he always said it best. Advertising doesn't create a product advantage, it can only convey it. No matter how skillful you are, Advertising doesn't create a product advantage, it can only convey it. No matter how skillful you are, you can't invent a product advantage that doesn't exist. So if you're advertising your miracle gum by saying it will never lose its flavor, well, you're lying. You have to back up any claims you make and customers will be happy to admit you're right if you can actually prove that you can save them, you know, 15% on car insurance, or save them two weeks of work using your productivity app. The key to success is for you to fully understand all of the benefits. weeks of work using your productivity app. The key to success is for you to fully understand all of the benefits. Only then can you ensure that the reader knows them and can relate to them. In the next lecture, we'll discuss the importance of knowing your competition, and how you can define the unique value that makes you more attractive to your audience. All right, guys. See you then! All right, guys. See you then!