The Eight Exceptional Vessels Qigong
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The Eight Exceptional Vessels Qigong

Working with the Qi of the Extraordinary Meridians
4.6 (9 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
41 students enrolled
Created by Des Lawton
Last updated 4/2017
English
Current price: $10 Original price: $60 Discount: 83% off
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Includes:
  • 2 hours on-demand video
  • 1 Article
  • 4 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Create a quiet body/mind by using Wuji stance. Practice three Qigong exercises that work specifically with the Extraordinary Meridians, the Exceptional Vessels.
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • No previous knowledge of Qigong required. This course is suitable for all levels.
Description

Let me start by stating the obvious, Qi, and gong, are two words.  Just two words. Qi meaning energy (life energy) and gong meaning work, or skill.  The name “Qigong” was first used, in the late 1940’s, by Liu Guizhen but he did not invent the words or the exercises.............. They were already there.  What he did was coin a generic phrase that would be used to describe a wide range of, often disparate, exercises.

One of the systems that was integrated into Qigong was Dao Yin, the guiding and pulling exercises that used external stimuli to create Internal movement.  Since the 1950s the use of the name Dao Yin to describe its actual function declined and was replaced by Qigong.  Dao Yin was gradually relegated and often used to describe the warm up exercises practiced before qigong.

Other systems that were integrated were Neidan and Neigong, both of which work, purely, Internally and focus on guiding and experiencing the Qi, rather than on external movement.

Now we find that the terms Dao Yin, Neidan & Neigong are being used again by some teachers of Internal skills.  Why is this?  Could it be because, in the West, the generic name “qigong” is now being used to describe exercises that have degenerated to being purely physical and that are no longer Internal?  In some cases these exercises are, and always have been, of a physical nature.  In others, exercises that were developed for Internal work have been misunderstood, mimicked, and wrongly taught in a manner that has become physical with a sprinkling of visualization thrown in.

Qi is tangible.  It does not need to be visualized.  Within Dao Yin, Neidan, Neigong and Qigong (when the literal translation is used and adhered to):

  • You lead and guide the Qi.
  • You experience the Qi, tangibly.
  • You use this, tangible, feedback to increase your skill.
  • You use the, physical, movements as a means and not an end.


These Qigong exercises work with the Qi that is stored in the Eight Exceptional Vessels (aka the Extraordinary Meridians). These vessels are often likened to reservoirs that store Qi and blood while the Meridians can be likened to rivers that carry the Qi.

As well as using the Yi (that is the brain), the eyes and the breath to guide the Qi, these exercises also make use of the Master Points and the Coupled Points.

The quality, essence, of the Qi of the Exceptional Vessels is tangibly different to that of the Twelve Meridians.  These exercises will open out an opportunity for you to experience this for yourself.

Who is the target audience?
  • Taiji and Qigong practitioners. Shiatsu and Reiki practitioners. People who are interested in, spiritual, growth.
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Curriculum For This Course
23 Lectures
02:09:10
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Introduction
1 Lecture 11:40
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Necessary Qigong information
6 Lectures 16:39

A, short, glossary of the terms that are used in this course.

Glossary
03:11

This lecture provides information about the benefits that Qigong has on the body's systems.

Qigong Benefits
02:37

There are some fundamentals that must be understood and practiced before qigong can become Qigong.  That is to say, before it becomes an effective Qigong exercise.  These are explained in this lecture.

Qigong Fundamentals
02:32

This lecture explains the use of Listening Jing, passive awareness of the Qi as it flows and changes.

Listening Jing
03:17

This lecture demystifies and explains some of the common terms that are used within Qigong.

Common Terms Used in Qigong
02:43

The body movement and postures are only on part of Qigong, just one of the tools.  This lecture covers the other tools that are used, that are needed, to make a Qigong exercise effective.

Qigong Toolbox
02:19
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Stances
2 Lectures 21:49

The stance is important in any Qigong exercise.  In the Eight Exceptional Vessels we use Wuji stance.  This lecture explains how to attain that stance.

Wuji Stance
17:52

There are some, common, basic errors when trying to stand in Wuji.  This lecture highlights them in order for the practitioner to rectify them.

Common Errors
03:57
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Qigong Routemap
1 Lecture 02:47

A short lecture on best practice for Qigong.

Guidelines for Practice
02:47
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The Eight Exceptional Vessels Qigong
13 Lectures 01:16:32

This lecture breaks the first exercise down and highlights all the focus points that should be listened to.

The Eight Exceptional Vessels - Exercise 1, lesson 1
05:35

This lecture works through the entire movement of the first exercise repeatedly, once again highlighting the points and areas that the practitioner should be listening to.

The Eight Exceptional Vessels - Exercise 1, lesson 2
15:07

This lecture is a reprise of all the points and areas that the practitioner should be listening to, in the first exercise.

The Eight Exceptional Vessels - Exercise 1, focus points
05:20

This lecture breaks the second exercise down and highlights all the focus points that should be listened to.

The Eight Exceptional Vessels - Exercise 2, lesson 1
05:08

This lecture works through the entire movement of the second exercise repeatedly, once again highlighting the points and areas that the practitioner should be listening to.

The Eight Exceptional Vessels - Exercise 2, lesson 2
09:22

This lecture is a reprise of all the points and areas that the practitioner should be listening to, in the second exercise.

The Eight Exceptional Vessels - Exercise 2, focus points
05:23

This lecture breaks the third exercise down and highlights all the focus points that should be listened to.

The Eight Exceptional Vessels - Change the Sinews, lesson 1
02:32

This lecture works through the entire movement of the third exercise repeatedly, once again highlighting the points and areas that the practitioner should be listening to.

The Eight Exceptional Vessels - Change the Sinews, lesson 2
11:02

This lecture is a reprise of all the points and areas that the practitioner should be listening to, in the third exercise.

The Eight Exceptional Vessels - Change the Sinews, focus points
03:49

This lecture explains that finishing the physical movement does not mean that you have finished Qigong.  These are guidelines for listening to the changes that have occurred.

Post Exercise Awareness
03:23

This lecture covers simple exercises that get you transmitting and receiving Qi.  This is a great way of starting to appreciate the incredible variety of ways in which Qi can be "felt".

Listening Exercises
05:54

A brief summary of what the course has covered and what you should be focusing on.

Summary
02:32

Thank you
01:25
About the Instructor
Des Lawton
5.0 Average rating
26 Reviews
83 Students
2 Courses
Connecting Heaven and Earth Qigong

I have been practicing Qigong since 1985 and teaching, albeit starting at a very basic level, since 1989.  In 1996, after three and a half years of study with the Glasgow School of Shiatsu, I qualified as a Registered Shiatsu Practitioner.  My previous knowledge of Qigong really helped me with the Shiatsu and, equally, learning Traditional Chinese Medicine as part of the Shiatsu course served to increase my understanding of Qigong. In the late 1990s, it was my good fortune to have been, finally, accepted as an Inner Sanctum student by Master Joseph Bell ( a student and direct lineage descendant of Master Wang Jiu Mei).