String Math - Crochet, Braiding, Lanyards
4.3 (2 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
29 students enrolled
Wishlisted Wishlist

Please confirm that you want to add String Math - Crochet, Braiding, Lanyards to your Wishlist.

Add to Wishlist

String Math - Crochet, Braiding, Lanyards

Learn why crochet, braiding, and lanyards work, how to manipulate them, and how to make patterns.
4.3 (2 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
29 students enrolled
Created by Rebekah West
Last updated 6/2015
English
Current price: $10 Original price: $20 Discount: 50% off
1 day left at this price!
30-Day Money-Back Guarantee
Includes:
  • 3.5 hours on-demand video
  • 4 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Understand how knitting and crocheting differ and how they work.
  • Crochet chain, single, double half, double, and triple stitches.
  • Practice implementing and creating patterns for different geometric shapes worked in a straight and in a round.
  • Make a hat for a specific head.
  • Make a granny square afghan using more than just the traditional double stitch.
  • Understand how braiding and weaving differ and how they work.
  • Braid traditional 3, 4, and 5 strand braids.
  • Braid french 3, 4, and 5 strand braids both inward and outward.
  • Understand how even and odd stranded french braids differ.
  • Braid curved braids in 3, 4, and 5 strands.
  • Make a wavy woven bookmark or belt or strap.
  • Understand how lanyards work.
  • Weave straight 2x2, 2x4, 2x4, and 2x6 strand lanyards.
  • Weave spun 2x2, 2x4, 2x6, and 2x8 strand lanyards.
  • Understand and practice reversing the spin on a lanyard.
  • Understand and practice how to split and join lanyards by inserting and removing extra strands.
  • Make a lanyard that resembles a DNA strand.
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • Crochet hook
  • Yarn (at least 3 skeins)
  • Scissors
  • Paper and pencil (or computer)
  • Ribbon, string, leather strips, or hair for braiding
  • Lanyard string (preferably buy a spool we will use a lot)
  • Graph Paper
  • Calculator
Description

This course is about understanding the underlying processes in crochet, braids, and lanyards. By studying the theory behind these arts we will learn how to better manipulate and create projects. Students do not need a background in crochet, braiding, or lanyards; though I would reccomend it. I do recommend that you know your basic mathematics functions of addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, area, and slope. We will be using these skills to create patterns of our own. The course contains over two hours of content covering the theory, stitches, patterns, and quirks of crochet, braiding, and lanyards. There are four projects over the course of the class a hat, afghan, bookmark, and DNA lanyard. The course is broken up into three parts crochet, braiding, and lanyards. Each section covers theory first, then stitches, patterns, and finally the final project. I recommend taking this course if you wish to better understand crochet, braiding, or lanyards. This course can help those who have struggled with crochet, braiding, or lanyards. It can help those wishing to make patterns in these arts understand the rules and logic by which they function. This course is for all who desire to make beautiful art with string.

Who is the target audience?
  • This course is designed for those wishing to better understand crochet, braiding, or lanyards by studying and applying theory.
  • This course is good for those who wish to begin creating their own patterns.
  • This course is good for all levels of experience in crochet, braiding , and lanyards since we will be starting from the basics for each to study the theory.
  • This course is not for those who want a patterns in the traditional crochet shorthand. We will be working from the theory, you will have to think and use your imagination.
Students Who Viewed This Course Also Viewed
Curriculum For This Course
Expand All 66 Lectures Collapse All 66 Lectures 03:48:09
+
Introduction
1 Lecture 01:15
+
Crocheting - Theory and Function
3 Lectures 04:14

Objective: How knitting works.

Notes: Knitting can unravel. Knitting is worked horizontally and unravels vertically.

Knitting Theory
01:45

Objective: How crochet works.

Notes: Crochet can unravel. Crochet is worked horizontally and unravels horizontally.

Preview 00:55

Objective: Crochet and knitting can unravel.

Notes: Unraveling is unique to crochet and knitting because it is worked in loops.

The Unravel Concept
01:34

Crochet Theory
3 questions
+
Crocheting - Stitches
6 Lectures 17:47

Objective: Crochet a chain stitch.

Notes: A slip knot resembles a regular knot except you do not pull the end all the way through. Chain stitch is simply one loop pulled through another loop creating more loops. This is done by wrapping the yarn around the hook and pulling it through the original loop.

Materials: Yarn, Crochet hook, Scissors(optional)

Homework: Practice the chain stitch, you do not need to post a picture of your sampler.

Chain Stitch
04:33

Objective: Crochet a single stitch.

Notes: When working into the chain you will insert your hook under one part of a given V. To build the single stitch you will first insert your hook under the V. Then you will wrap your yarn once around your hook and pull it out from under the V. You will then wrap your hook once more and pull that loop through all loops on your hook, resolving the stitch. When working into any stitch other than the chain stitch you will insert your hook under both parts of the V. When you come to the end of a row add a single chain before turning.

Materials: Yarn, Crochet hook, Scissors(optional)

Homework: Make a single stitch sampler 10 stitches wide and 10 rows tall.

Single Stitch
03:12

Objective: Finish off a sampler.

Notes: When you have finished your final stitch you will cut your yarn leaving some excess. You will then chain one but pull the yarn all the way through. Pull until tight.

Materials: Yarn, Crochet hook, Scissors

Homework: Finish off your single stitch sampler

Finishing Off
00:51

Objective: Crochet a double half stitch.

Notes: To do this stitch wrap your yarn around your hook before inserting your hook under the V. Once you are under the V wrap again and pull the loop through the V. You will wrap one last time and pull the new loop through all your stitches resolving the stitch. When turning rows add a single chain to the end before turning.

Materials: Yarn, Crochet hook, Scissors

Homework: Make a double half stitch sampler 10 stitches wide and 10 rows tall.

Double Half Stitch
02:04

Objective: Crochet a double stitch.

Notes: To build the double stitch you will wrap before inserting your hook under the V. You will wrap again and pull your new loop back under the V. You will wrap a new loop and pull it through only two loops. Wrap again and pull through the remaining loops resolving the stitch. When you end a row add two chains before turning.

Materials: Yarn, Crochet hook, Scissors

Homework: Make a double stitch sampler 10 stitches wide and 10 rows tall.

Double Stitch
02:28

Objective: Crochet a triple stitch.

Notes: To build this stitch first wrap twice before inserting your hook under the V. Once you are under wrap your yarn around the hook and pull the new loop back under the V. You will then wrap and pull through two loops. Wrap and pull through two loops. Wrap and pull through the remaining loops resolving the stitch. When ending a row make three chain stitches before turning and beginning the next row.

Materials: Yarn, Crochet hook, Scissors

Homework: Make a triple stitch sampler 10 stitches wide and 10 rows tall.

Triple Stitch
04:39
+
Crocheting - Geometry
18 Lectures 01:17:11

Objective: Crochet a square or rectangle built from a chain.

Notes: Squares are the same height as they are wide. There are no stitches removed or added to create a rectangle or a square.

Materials: Yarn, Crochet hook, Scissors, Tape measure

Homework: If you do not have samplers already build a sampler of a square and a rectangle.

Working from a Chain - Squares and Rectangles
01:57

Objective: Increase or decrease crochet stitches.

Notes: To increase stitches you will stitch multiple stitches into one V. This is added at the beginning or end of a row. To decrease stitches there are two options. My preferred method is to skip the first stitch of a row and work into the second V. The other option is to omit a stitch on the end before creating your chain and turning. This method does not provide a smooth edge.

Materials: Yarn, Crochet hook, Scissors

Homework: Practice increasing and decreasing stitches.

Increasing and Decreasing
03:50

Objective: Crochet a parallelogram and a trapezoid from a chain.

Notes: Parallelograms and Trapezoids both have parallel lines. Trapezoids have one set of parallel lines. Parallelograms have two sets of parallel lines. Slope is documented as the rows over the stitches (rise over run). So if a work increases by one stitch every 3 rows the slope would be 3/1. Trapezoids may have two different slopes for the sides that are not parallel. Parallelograms must have the same slope on both sides.

Materials: Yarn, Crochet hook, Scissors

Homework: Make a parallelogram and a trapezoid. Document your slopes either numerically or with graph paper.

Working from a Chain - Parallelograms and Trapezoids
05:38

Objective: Crochet a equilateral, isosceles, right, and scalene triangles from a chain.

Notes: Triangles are any shape with three corners and three sides. The equilateral triangle has the same angle for every corner and the same length for every side. With single stitch your triangle will be roughly the same number of rows tall as it is wide. The Isosceles triangle has two sides that are the same length and two angles that are the same. The right triangle will have a "square" angle somewhere on it. This is most simply done by only decreasing one side. The scalene triangle has no rules except to have three corners and three sides. This triangle will have two different slopes.

Materials: Yarn, Crochet hook, Scissors

Homework: Make each of the 4 triangles. Don't forget to document your slopes.

Working from a Chain - Triangles
05:13

Objective: Crochet a kite and a diamond from a chain.

Notes: Diamonds will start from a point and have the same slope and length for all the sides. The kite will also start from a point but it will have different slope and length for the bottom two sides or the top two sides.

Materials: Yarn, Crochet hook, Scissors

Homework: Make a Diamond and a Kite. Document your slopes.

Working from a Chain - Diamonds and Kites
02:55

Geometric Shapes
4 questions

Objective: Set up a round for crochet.

Notes: One way a round can be made is by making four chain stitches. You will then insert your hook into the first chain stitch you made, wrap your yarn around your hook and pull through all loops. You are then ready to chain as many stitches as you need to match the height of the stitch you are using. There are three different possibilities with a round that you are making. A flat circle has exactly enough stitches to make a perfectly round shape without warping. A bell shaped circle has not enough stitches and is therefore curling in on itself. A flair shaped (or saddle, Spanish skirt shaped) circle has extra stitches and is beginning to roll in waves.

Materials: Yarn, Crochet hook

Homework: Practice building a round.

Working from a Round - Set Up - Basic Theory
06:09

Objective: Crochet a circle worked in a round following a given pattern.

Notes: Begin with a round and follow the number of stitches and stitch patterns in the attached files.

Materials: Yarn, Crochet hook, Scissors, Attached files

Homework: Make a new circle adapting from my original pattern as needed. Document your own stitch pattern using the file attached. I am not looking for exactly perfect circles, I am looking to see your thought process and struggle to solve problems you encounter.

Preview 08:38

Objective: Make circle patterns.

Materials: Yarn, Crochet hook, Scissors, Attached files

Homework: Build your own circle pattern and test it.

Circle Patterns
1 page

Objective: Make an oval.

Notes: An oval is a circle split in half with extra material in between. Your initial chain will have to have the number of stitches you want the oval center wide as well as a stitch for each apex of your circle halves. If you have a odd numbered circle pattern you will have to choose an even number on either side to split in half. You will never increase the number of stitches in your center section, your circle halves will already be adding any addtional stitches you would need.

Materials: Yarn, Crochet hook, Scissors, Cricle pattern

Homework: Your homework is make an oval. Document the circle pattern you used as well as the number of stitches you added between your circle halves.

Working from a Round - Ovals - Single Stitch
07:09

Objective: Measure your head and sampler.

Notes: Measure your head where the brim of the hat should hit. Your gauge will need to be measure how many stitches are in an inch as well as how many rows are in an inch.

Materials: Sampler, Head, Measuring tape

Homework: Measure the head you are going to make your hat for. Measure your gauge on your sampler for rows and stitches per inch. Document all of this.

Working from a Round - Bell Pattern Theory - Measurement
02:46

Objective: Calculate the preliminary numbers to prepare for a pattern.

Notes: In this lecture I will explain how to create part I of your pattern. There is an example and a template you may used attached here. I have also included a screen cast (that is in time with the movie) if you wish to visualize the process as the lecture is going or at your own leisure.

Materials: Attached files(printed), Compass, pen or pencil, Calculator(with Pi function)

Homework: Complete all preliminary math for your measurements.

Working from a Round - Bell Pattern Theory - Mathematics I
09:40

Objective: Complete the bell pattern based on your previous calculations.

Notes: In this lecture I will explain how to create part II of your pattern. There is an example and a template you may used attached here. I have also included a screen cast (that is in time with the movie) if you wish to visualize the process as the lecture is going or at your own leisure.

Materials: Attached files(printed), pen or pencil, Calculator(if your wish)

Homework: Complete all sections of the pattern template based off your measurements.

Working from a Round - Bell Pattern Theory - Mathematics II
05:44

Objective: Make your hat following your pattern.

Notes: Build your hat following your pattern. Skip counting is your friend. If you have a row of 36 stitches and every 2nd and 3rd stitch are in the same section, then skip count. 3, 6, 9, 12...33, 36. This way you will never loose track of your count by counting two things at once.

Materials: Yarn, Crochet hook, Scissors, Your pattern

Homework: Make your hat following your pattern.

Working from a Round - Bell Pattern Theory - Hat Project
02:48

Objective: Tuck in the ends of your work.

Notes: Weave the tails of your work into the main body of the work so that they are hidden.

Materials: Finished project, Crochet hook

Homework: Tuck in the ends of your hat or any other piece.

Tucking in the Ends
01:38

Objective: Crochet a round square.

Notes: The corners of the square are 90 degree angles. The corner pattern we will be using is 3 double stitches, 2 chain stitches, 3 double stitches. This creates the 90 degree angle.

Materials: Yarn, Crochet hook, Scissors

Homework: Make a square worked in a round.

Working from a Round - Quadrilaterals
05:00

Objective: Crochet a round triangle.

Notes: The corners of the triangle are 60 degree angles. The corner pattern we will be using is 4 double stitches, 3 chain stitches, 4 double stitches. This creates the 60 degree angle.

Materials: Yarn, Crochet hook, Scissors

Homework: Make a triangle worked in a round.

Working from a Round - Triangles
04:14

Objective: Learn the relationships between stitches and angles in rounds.

Homework: Observe the differences between the angles.

Working from a Round - Polygon Theory
2 pages

Objective: Crochet a round hexagon.

Notes: The corners of the hexagon are 120 degree angles. The corner pattern we will be using is 2 double stitches, 1 chain stitch, 2 double stitches. This creates the 120 degree angle.

Materials: Yarn, Crochet hook, Scissors

Homework: Make a hexagon worked in a round.

Working from a Round - Hexagons
03:52
+
Crocheting - Final Project
2 Lectures 04:18

Objective: Observe some common errors in my afghan.

Homework: Keep these ideas in mind when you make your own afghan.

Common Problems and How to Find Them
02:03

Objective: Find some inspiration to be creative in your stitch choices.

Homework: Your homework is to make your afghan following one of the polygon patterns (triangle, square, or hexagon). Please try different stitches and share your work with us.

Some Stitch Pattern Ideas
02:15
+
Braiding and Weaving - Theory and Function
2 Lectures 04:29

Objective: Observe that a strand disappears from sight.

Notes: With any given braid one strand will disappear behind the rest of the work and not be visible.

The Disappearing Strand
01:55

Objective: Observe the similarities and differences between weaving and braiding.

Notes: Weaving contains a pattern of over and under that is observable in braiding as well. Braiding is done diagonally. Weaving is worked horizontally and vertically. Because braiding is worked this way all strands share the tension through the work. In the weaving the one strand (pink) has full control of the tension. It is the primary strand in the weaving vs. the shared work of the braid.


Braiding is Weaving
02:34
+
Braiding and Weaving - Traditional Braids
3 Lectures 08:35

Objective: Braid a traditional three strand braid.

Notes: The three strand braid has a pattern of moving strands from the bottom to the top in a pattern of right, left, right, left. This over and under pattern of moving from the bottom to the top should remind you of the weaving.

Materials: ribbon(or other string), a way to anchor your end

Homework: Make a three strand braid. Only post if you need feedback these are a little hard to see.

Three Strand Braid
02:02

Objective: Braid a traditional four strand braid.

Notes: The four strand braid has a pattern of moving strand from the bottom to the top in a pattern of left, left, right. The even stranded braids will have a mismatched set of movements. As you can see there are two left ward movements and one right hand movement.

Materials: ribbon(or other string), a way to anchor your end

Homework: Make a four strand braid. Only post if you need feedback these are a little hard to see.

Four Strand Braid
02:27

Objective: Braid a traditional five strand braid.

Notes: The five strand braid has a pattern of moving strand from the bottom to the top in a pattern of left, left, right, right. When you weave this it will become very apparent how similar this is to traditional weaving.

Materials: ribbon(or other string), a way to anchor your end

Homework: Make a five strand braid. Only post if you need feedback these are a little hard to see.

Five Strand Braid and More
04:06
+
Braiding and Weaving - French Braids
5 Lectures 12:49

Objective: Observe the difference of inward and outward turning on a french braid.

Notes: When you turn inward you will notice that the new strands coming in will be the "columns" of the part of the braid. In effect the new strands are covering the sides of the braid. When you turn outward you will observe that the braid is on top of the new strands coming in creating a ridge. The new strands do not cover up the "columns" of the braid that we talked about in the disappearing strand.

Inward and Outward Turning
03:03

Objective: Braid a half french three strand braid.

Notes: Adding small amounts of additional hair (or yarn) is what defines french braiding. The half french only adds strands to one side.

Materials: Wig or a friend's head

Homework: Your optional homework is practice the 3 strand half french braid on a friend or a wig.

Three Strand Half French Braid
01:49

Objective: Braid a full french three strand braid.

Notes: The full french braid adds strands to both sides of your braid whenever a new strand is moved to either side.

Materials: Wig or a friend's head

Homework: Your optional homework is practice the 3 strand full french braid on a friend or wig.

Preview 01:38

Objective: Braid a full french four strand braid.

Notes: The four strand french braid adds strands to both sides. The sides will still appear different since one side will always be turning inward and one side will be turning outward.

Materials: Wig or a friend's head

Homework: Your optional homework is practice the 4 strand french braid on a friend or a wig.

Four Strand Full French Braid and Even Strand Peculiarities
03:05

Objective: Braid a full french five strand braid.

Notes: The five strand braid adds strands to both sides. Notice that like the three strand braid both sides will be inward turning or outward turning.

Materials: Wig or a friend's head.

Homework: Your optional homework is to practice the 5 strand french braid on a friend or wig.

Five Strand Full French Braid and Comparison to Even Strand Braids.
03:14

French Braiding
3 questions
+
Braiding and Weaving - Curved Braiding
3 Lectures 12:13

Objective: Braid a three strand braid that curves back and forth.

Notes: This curved or turned braid I found to be much easier when using a stiff material like the lanyard string. I have provided a photo of my lanyard string 3 strand braid here so you can see more clearly the movement of the strands. Please note the one strand that remains unchanged going straight throughout the work unturned. Your homework for this lesson is make a curved 3 strand braid. If you happened to purchase "The Complete Guide to Needlework" the rug making section can also show you how to use three strand curved braids to make oval or rectangle rugs.

Materials: Ribbon(or other string), a way to anchor your end

Homework: Make a curved 3 strand braid.

Three Strand Pattern and Theory
04:23

Objective: Braid a four strand braid that curves back and forth.

Notes: This curved or turned braid I found to be much easier when using a stiff material like the lanyard string. I have provided a photo of my lanyard string 6 strand braid here so you can see more clearly the movement of the strands. Please note the strands that go straight through the work unturned.

Materials: Ribbon(or string), a way to anchor your end

Homework: Make a curved 4 strand braid.

Four Strand Pattern and Theory
03:13

Objective: Braid a five strand braid that curves back and forth.

Notes: This curved or turned braid I found to be much easier when using a stiff material like the lanyard string. I have provided a photo of my lanyard string 6 strand braid here so you can see more clearly the movement of the strands. Again observe how the strands are traveling through the work.

Materials: Ribbon(or string), a way to anchor your end

Homework: Make a curved 5 strand braid.

Five Strand Pattern and Theory
04:37
+
Braiding and Weaving - Final Project
1 Lecture 00:00

Objective: Apply the concepts you have learned into a complete work.

Final Project Example and Tips
1 page
4 More Sections
About the Instructor
Rebekah West
4.3 Average rating
2 Reviews
29 Students
1 Course

I have been teaching for two and half years now in the grades of PreK, 1st grade, 2nd Grade, and 3rd grade. I was the primary teacher at my daycare center while teaching PreK, and was co-teaching with a licensed teacher in the elementary school. I will be Student teaching in the fall of 2015 in a 6th grade classroom through New Mexico State University. I do have recommendation letters on request from my co-operating teachers from 1st grade and 2/3rd grade as well as evaluations.

While teaching in the PreK classroom I had the responsibility of lesson planning, assessment, classroom management, and adherence to the state standards. I had to develop my own curriculum for the classroom because there was no curriculum in place. In my class we studied motor skills, literacy, phonics, science, music, numeracy, geometry and social emotional development. I developed my own assessments to monitor learning daily with portfolios of students work and documentation of informal assessments. The classroom had to adhere as well to the ECERS which was required by the state. It was my job to make certain that at all times my classroom was safe and educationally stimulating.

In the elementary school my job was primarily to assist and aid in reading instruction and writing. I developed daily creative writing projects, read alouds, and assessments of student learning. Math was almost exclusively taught in the afternoon so I have less experience teaching at the elementary school level. I am teaching elementary school because I am very diverse in my skill set. My concentrations for my B.S. are Science and Language Arts. I will also be testing through the NES to include music, art, and technology as well. I currently have passed my NMTA and NES Teacher Competency, Basic Skills, and Elementary Content.

Technology is becoming a dominant force in the classroom and I feel it is my job to improve and contribute to that environment. I chose Udemy for its professionalism and dedication to quality. I hope on Udemy to create a course integrating Math and Art (String Math). If that course goes well I hope to teach other courses possibly on the new method of classroom management Positive Redirection or Handbell Technique.