SIRIUS Dog Training Academy - Day 2 of 4
0.0 (0 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
32 students enrolled

SIRIUS Dog Training Academy - Day 2 of 4

Day 2: Behavior Counseling
0.0 (0 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
32 students enrolled
Created by Ian Dunbar
Last updated 7/2013
English
English [Auto-generated]
Price: $29.99
30-Day Money-Back Guarantee
This course includes
  • 5.5 hours on-demand video
  • 4 downloadable resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
Training 5 or more people?

Get your team access to Udemy's top 3,000+ courses anytime, anywhere.

Try Udemy for Business
What you'll learn
  • Learn how to conduct Behavior Consultations, safely and profitably
  • Learn how to attain owner compliance with training plans

  • Learn how to evaluate and quantify improvement

  • Learn how to resolve the most common behavior problems
  • Learn how to take a history and distinguish between objective and subjective information
  • Learn to assess the severity and danger of aggression
Requirements
  • There are no requirements to take this course
Description

For a limited time use the Promo Code "I Love Dogs" to save $10 on your registration

Day 2: Behavior Counseling

Dr. Dunbar taught the world's very first off-leash puppy socialization and training classes and he has been perfecting the SIRIUS Dog Training business model for the past 30 years. If you are a dog training professional, or you're thinking of becoming one, this is the course you simply must take.

The SIRIUS Academy is a structured and comprehensive course on how to run a successful dog training business. This course cuts to the chase and focuses on the essential information that you absolutely need to know in order to effectively teach people to train dogs as quickly, easily and enjoyably as possible.

Day 2 of the Academy consists of 6+ hours of video lecture and two free eBooks. It does not include all the notes that come with the full 4 day Academy. It has been approved for 6 CEUs by the CCPDT & IAABC.

The full Academy consists of 4 days of lecture, 6+ hours each, as well as substantial notes, including notes for the lectures, a Behavior Problem Solving Matrix, and the complete SIRIUS Syllabi for Puppy 1, Puppy 2, and Adult 1 classes, with week-by-week-schedules and minute-by-minute class notes.

“Whether you're new to dog training and wondering how to get started in the business, or you've been doing it for ages (like me) and you're looking for some fresh ideas to super-charge your business, this is the very best place to get what you need. I found myself taking detailed notes for some long-term changes, and then also jotting down little nuggets of gold to go home and immediately implement into my classes or business practices…

This four-day event, and yes, you MUST attend all four days, offers the attendee who already has some hands-on experience with dogs everything they need to start up their own classes. Those of us who've already been running our own classes come away with many new ideas for classroom games and exercises for both puppies and adult dogs, PLUS a comprehensive, tested plan to measure and increase our success, and to market ourselves (which we could all use help with).

I am so excited to make some changes! Thanks so much for everything!"

- Michelle Douglas, CPDT-KA, CDBC – Past President of the APDT

Who this course is for:
  • Professional dog trainers and anyone interested in becoming a professional dog trainer
  • Dog Shelter and Rescue Organization personnel
  • Veterinarians and Vet Techs
Course content
Expand all 10 lectures 10:15:37
+ Notes
4 lectures 00:00
Day 2 SIRIUS Academy
4 pages
SIRIUS Academy Slides
9 pages
Everything about dog training is easier if you start it earlier in the puppy's development, especially socialization and housetraining.  The vast majority of behavior problems in adult dogs could have been easily prevented during puppyhood.  These behavior problems are often the reason dogs end up abandoned at shelters.

That's why we make BEFORE & AFTER You Get Your Puppy available as a free download.  This PDF file can actually be customized with your business contact information and then distributed freely as a valuable promotional tool.  You'll be promoting good puppy-raising practices and thereby helping to keep dogs out of shelters, all while promoting your own business.

BEFORE You Get Your Puppy
by Dr. Ian Dunbar

When you choose a new puppy, you need to meet six developmental deadlines before your puppy is just five months old. If your puppy fails to meet any of these deadlines, he will never achieve his full potential and will be playing ‘behavioral catch-up’ for the rest of his life. BEFORE You Get Your Puppy covers the first three developmental deadlines covering the period from puppy selection to your puppy’s first week at home. The last three developmental deadlines that your puppy needs to meet before he is six months old are described in a second book — AFTER You Get Your Puppy

1st Developmental Deadline — Your Education About Puppy Education
You need to complete your education about puppy education before you search for a puppy. You need to know how to select a good puppy and how puppies work. Selecting a puppy is similar to buying a car: Do lots of research beforehand and "test drive" a wide variety, especially including the one you intend to buy. But first, you need to learn how to drive. Specifically you need to know how to teach your puppy: where to eliminate, what to chew, when to bark, where to dig, to sit when greeting people, to walk calmly on-leash, to settle down and shush when requested, to inhibit biting behavior, to enjoy spending time at home alone, and to thoroughly enjoy the company of other dogs and people — especially strangers and children

2nd Developmental Deadline — Evaluating Your Prospective Puppy’s Progress
Before you choose your puppy, you need to know how to assess your prospective puppy’s current socialization and educational status. Regardless of breed or breeding, if socialization, errorless housetraining, and basic manners are not well underway by eight weeks of age, the puppy is already developmentally retarded.

3rd Developmental Deadline — Errorless Housetraining & Chewtoy-Training
Make certain that an errorless housetraining and chewtoy-training program is instituted from the very first day your puppy comes home.
Preview 104 pages
Everything about dog training is easier if you start it earlier in the puppy's development, especially socialization and housetraining.  The vast majority of behavior problems in adult dogs could have been easily prevented during puppyhood.  These behavior problems are often the reason dogs end up abandoned at shelters.

That's why we make BEFORE & AFTER You Get Your Puppy available as a free download.  This PDF file can actually be customized with your business contact information and then distributed freely as a valuable promotional tool.  You'll be promoting good puppy-raising practices and thereby helping to keep dogs out of shelters, all while promoting your own business.


AFTER You Get Your Puppy covers the last three developmental deadlines that your puppy needs to meet before he is six months old.

4th Developmental Deadline — Socializing Your Puppy to People

Your Most Urgent Priority is to socialize your puppy to a wide variety of people, especially children, men, and strangers, before he is twelve weeks old. Well-socialized puppies grow up to be wonderful companions, whereas antisocial dogs are difficult, time-consuming, and potentially dangerous. As a rule of thumb, your puppy needs to meet at least one hundred people before he is three months old. Since your puppy is still too young to venture out to dog parks and sidewalks, you’ll need to start inviting people to your home right away.

5th Developmental Deadline — Teaching Bite Inhibition

Your Most Important Priority is that your puppy learns to inhibit the force of his bites and develop a "soft mouth" before he is eighteen weeks old. Whenever a dog bites a person, or fights with another dog, the single most important prognostic factor is the degree of bite inhibition and hence, the likelihood and seriousness of injury. Accidents happen. Someone may tread on the dog’s paw, or a child may trip over the dog while he’s gnawing a bone. A dog may snap and lunge at a person when hurt or frightened, but if the dog has well-established bite inhibition, it is unlikely the dog’s teeth will puncture, or even touch the skin.

6th Developmental Deadline — Continuing Socialization in The World at Large
The Most Enjoyable Priority of dog ownership is to introduce your well-socialized puppy to the world at large. Your dog will only remain sociable and confident if he continues to meet and greet at least three unfamiliar people and three unfamiliar dogs every day. Meeting the same people and dogs over and over is not sufficient. Your dog needs to practice meeting, greeting, and getting along with strangers, not simply getting along with old friends. Regular walks with your dog are as essential as they are enjoyable.
Preview 156 pages
+ Video Lectures
6 lectures 05:42:37

Being able to identify basic behavior problems is very important as a trainer. When you begin training a dog the first thing you need to do is teach the meaning words. Once your dog learns what certain words mean then you are capable of giving full sentence instructions to your dog. You have now broken the communication barrier.

All this may come very naturally to you but it is important to remember that these concepts are not that easy for the average dog owner. It is up to you to teach them how to communicate with their dogs.  There are six E’s of training pet owners: it has to be easy, efficient, effective, enjoyable, efficacious and expedient. What you are teaching has to be simple and produce quick results. It should be fun so the owner and the dog want to do it and it has to be suitable for everyone in the family to follow instructions and set themselves up for success.

During training we attempt to accomplish five things: progressive desensitization, an increase in frequency of behavior, a decrease in frequency of behavior, putting a behavior on cue, and putting the absence of behavior on cue. In fact, putting a behavior on cue is usually easiest if you also put the opposite behavior on cue.  For example, you might teach woof so you can teach shush or you might put jazzed up activity on cue so you can also put settle down on cue. 

Preview 52:28

Pet dog training consists of five reward-based training techniques that cue behaviors to happen: physically prompting, luring, auto shaping, all or none reward training and shaping.  Physically prompting a training sequence and lure reward training follows the same pattern of 4 steps – request, prompt or lure, response, reward. Training collars and leashes are also considered prompts. The idea of lure reward training is to teach without the use of training equipment at all. 

The most common mistake that happens when practicing this method is not fading out the lure fast enough. It can quickly become a bribe and the behavior will become contingent upon getting a treat reward. The first step is to fade out the lure, and this can be done after just a few successful repetitions.  The second step is to gradually fade out the food reward, slowly replacing the food with life rewards.  As dogs get older they often lose interest in treats, and that's when it's really important that you've already incorporated life reward into training.

Auto shaping is the easiest way to train. One of the best examples of this is chew toy stuffing. A food-stuffed chew toy will train a pet dog to settle down and chew on that toy, for which they will be periodically rewarded when food falls out. Long term confinement is another great example.  So long as you structure the area correctly you can take advantage of your dog's natural elimination instincts to help them build good toilet habits.

All or none reward training takes time but it is very simple to do because there is no prompting or instruction. You simply wait for the behavior to take place and ignore all the rest. Reward desirable behavior and ignore undesirable behavior. Good behavior will then increase in frequency and bad behavior will decrease in frequency.

Shaping is a technique that uses a clicker to shape a behavior with very small approximations. This method is great for teaching behaviors that are complex, perhaps with multiple steps or for a behavior that simply cannot be lured.

Day 2 Video 2/6
56:41

Classical conditioning is very important for maintaining positive associations with training and creating a desire to learn. This method of training should never stop with puppies. They should be experiencing new things all the time and getting feedback and praise to let them know what they are doing is ok. This is how you foster a perfect temperament and a huggable dog. The easiest way to get a well-socialized dog is to have puppy parties. Expose your pup to children, men, music, pass them around to get touched and handled, stare them in the eyes and smile at them. If all of this is done at an early age then there will be no need for progressive desensitization later in life.

A lot of trainers believe that repeating a command for your dog is a mistake, but it's actually fine, assuming you actually follow up and demand compliance. If you allow your dog to blow you off he will quickly learn that he only has to listen to you sometimes and not others. A good rule of thumb is that once you repeat the command the behavior must be repeated by the dog until your dog does it correctly on the first command. Eventually he will learn that if he does it the first time you ask then he only has to do it once, but if you ask multiply times then he has to do it multiple times as well. Repetitive re-instruction doesn't have to be punishing but it needs to get their attention. Use an urgent tone of voice to get the point across.

It is also a good idea to practice training in all tones of voice. In the case of an emergency you are much more likely to scream your command than you are to address them with a sweet voice.  Teach your dog ahead of time that shouting is not bad, in fact it is rewarded with extra special praise and treats.

Day 2 Video 3/6
46:58

When a dog forgets his manners use specific redirection. You can actually use a single word to communicate three very important pieces of information: stop the current behavior, do this instead, and the potential danger of noncompliance.

When dealing with problem behaviors it is a good idea to put the problem on cue. Putting a behavior on cue makes it much easier to work on putting the cessation of that behavior on cue and it also allows you to use these "problem" behaviors as rewards. 

Create controlled training situations for your dog to practice the activities that regularly cause their problem behavior emerge.  When you're going through the course of your day you're not going to want to practice problematic situations with your dogs, so you have to make time for training sessions where you can repeat an exercise until they get it right.  If you're dog goes wild when someone rings the doorbell, you need to practice settling them down while someone rings the doorbell, and you'll probably need to repeat it a few times over before you can get your dog to behave appropriately.

It's always a good idea to use common sense management to prevent problems before they start.  Auto shape them while you are away from home in their long term confinement area with chew toys. Chew toy stuffing and hand feeding is the most important thing you can do for a new puppy. And when you are home make sure you practice short term confinement so they can work on potty training and learning to spend time happily settled down alone.

Day 2 Video 4/6
52:22

Quantifying behaviors is really important to see progress from week to week. Objective quantification can provide proof of improvement and allows you to offer a prognosis. You should be able to tell an owner how long is it going to take to train their dog and what should they expect. It also helps us determine what the problems really are. For example, is it separation anxiety or separation fun? Measuring and graphing out levels of activity while the owner is away will give you valuable information on how to handle a situation.

When working with aggression it is really important to properly assess the danger of the situation. Do you have the ability to take on this case and do you want to? A level 1 and 2 biter is easy to fix but level 3 is risky. A level 4 case should be avoided and leave the rest to a professional who handles aggression cases. Ask and assess what level your client's dog is at. If the dog is reactive and has never sent a dog or human to the hospital you have a good chance with it. Dogs that have hospitalized other dogs or humans do not have bite inhibition and other arrangements should be made for these animals, whether it be euthanasia or permanent confinement.

Education should be solution based. What we really need to know is the rank order of problem behaviors by incidences and their solutions. We currently have behavior blueprints that explain how to solve such problems. Looking at your behavior Matrix from your notes will give you a list of behavior problems and how to solve them in ranking order. When examining the behavior matrix, make sure to fill out the form with importance and with urgency. 

Day 2 Video 5/6
01:24:03

We continue to examine the behavior matrix and the behavior problems you will see most often and most common in the household and the different ways to solve them. House soiling can be addressed with total management and lure reward techniques that communicate when and where to go to the bathroom. Destructive chewing also requires total management, which prevents mistakes and auto shapes good behavior. Barking can be put on cue, you can reward the cessation of the barking with all or none reward training, or you can give them something else to do like chew toys.

It gets a little unclear when handling separation anxiety cases, is it separation anxiety or is it an owner absent problem? Diagnosis is very important. With anxiety you may need the help of a vet. This may take some time and patience to fix but also some tough love. The dog needs to learn how to be alone. Leaving him with a chew toy can provide a break in anxiety and you can add cues to his environment that will become secondary reinforces and relaxers. Chew toys are a great way to fix most owner absent problems.

Hyper activity can be put on cue in a game we like to call Meet the Beast. By training your dog to become excited and energetic on cue, you create a situation where you can train them to be calm and quiet on cue. If you practice switching them from active to calm you'll end up with the very valuable ability to control their activity level. Jumping up, leash pulling and running away can also be put on cue, allowing you to put the opposite behavior on cue as well.

Day 2 Video 6/6
50:05