History of Mexico Since Colonial Times to Present
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History of Mexico Since Colonial Times to Present

The Mexican Revolution, Political Parties, and Women's Movements in the XX-th Century
0.0 (0 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
4 students enrolled
Last updated 9/2013
English
History of Mexico Since Colonial Times to Present
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What Will I Learn?
To understand colonial Mexican History: Mayan and Aztec Civilizations. To understand the causes of the Mexican Revolution and the making of the Mexican Constitution. How the political parties work in contemporary Mexican society. Today's social movements and the drug economy.
Causes and consequences of the Revolution
Major Obstacles in Mexico's Development
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • Some knowledge of Mexican Spanish
Description

History of Mexico is a general survey of the History of Mexico from its pre-conquest origins to the present. We will explore the social, political, and economic transformations of the country, paying particular attention to the impact of poverty and health issues on the everyday lives of the Mexican people. It also looks at the way Mexico’s economic and political relationship to the rest of the world –particularly to the United States—has shaped the nation. We are analyzing the causes and consequences of the Mexican Revolution, and what are the main obstacles in Mexico to development.

Required Readings:

The books listed below are required reading for this course and are available for purchase at the UCLA bookstore. Also we are using this timeline of Mexican History: http://mexicanhistory.org

1) MacLachlan, Colin M., and Beezley, William H. El Gran Pueblo: A History of Greater Mexico. Prentice Hall, 1999.

2) Altman, Ida, Cline, Sarah, and Pescador, Juan Javier. The Early History of Greater Mexico. Prentice Hall, 2003.

Sam Quiñones, True Tales from Another Mexico: The Lynch Mob, The Popsicle Kings, Chalino, and the Bronx (University of New Mexico Press, 2001)

3. Meyer and Sherman, a novel, and “Chalino, Popsicle kings…”

A good dictionary is highly recommended.

In order to receive the electronic articles and course announcements, you need to email me sometime before the end of the second week to be placed on our course mailing list. On the re: line simply write “History 126, MW 11”, or whichever class you’re enrolled in and in the content write “subscribe”. If you do not have an email account, you can set up a free account with any commercial service such as hotmail (www.gmail.com) or yahoo (www.yahoo.com), or you can set a free account at our URL (UCLA, in the library).

In addition, I will e-mail youa few recent documents and a few newspaper articles that will bring us up to date on some of the topics we will be discussing. I will also be emailing you recent articles as they appear in online newspapers and magazines. All of these handouts/articles are required reading as well.

Given that there is so much material to sort through in this course, my lectures are designed to help you understand the “big picture” first and foremost. We will identify the patterns of human activity and then add layers of complexity with more details and examples. Otherwise, we run the danger of not seeing the forest for the trees and we’ll be faced with a frustrating exercise in trying to sort through seemingly endless lists of names, dates, places, etc… Thus, my lectures and the readings overlap but do not parallel one another. Consistent attendance in lectures and participation in discussion sections is essential to understanding the course themes, the readings and films, and of course, to performing well in the class.

I will place copies of the books on my webpage for you, where you can download them for free.

Course Requirements and Expectations

The final course grade will be calculated based on the following components:

2. Interactive Journal (10%)- You will write a series of short thought pieces in which you show your understanding of the concepts and themes being explored in the course and how your readings and films relate to them. I will give you the topics or questions and you will either write them in class or bring your written responses to class prepared to discuss them with your peers and myself. You will receive feedback on your responses during our discussions. You will title, date, and keep them all together in order (this will include your written responses to the films as well) and turn them all in on the last day of class.

3. Class Participation (10%)- In order to fully comprehend the complexities of all of our material and to see how each of our themes or topics fits into the “larger picture”, you will have a series of designated class discussions in which we devote class time to exploring our course themes and how our readings and films relate to them. You will, in turn, receive credit for your verbal contributions and active listening in our group and online class discussions. Because discussions are only productive when you have completed the readings, seen the films, and have your journal responses ready.

4. Map Quiz (5%) The first is a map quiz in which you identify the Mexican states and is worth 5% of your grade. These questions are multiple-choice).

5. Film Analysis (15%)- A 3 to 5 page analysis of any one of the full length films we will have seen in the course, or those that I will recommend to you during class. Your task will be to place the film into historical context, assesses its strengths and weaknesses as a historical document, and provide an overview of the ways that the film contributes to our understanding of the history of the region at that time. Please feel free to consult me at any time during the course of this project. I’d be happy to provide you with feedback. This one is due the last day of class.

6. Midterm Exam (25%)- This exam will be comprised of identification of terms and concepts, one short essay, and one longer and comprehensive essay. Part one asks you to identify four terms or concepts and to state their historical significance. Part two asks you to write a short essay on a topic I assign to you. In part three, you will to incorporate all of the knowledge you have accumulated from your readings, lectures, discussions, and films into a comprehensive essay. The midterm covers material from our lectures, films, and readings since day one. A blue book is required (no scantron for this one). It can be purchased at the bookstore.

7. Final Exam (30%)- This exam will be comprised of identification of terms and concepts and two comprehensive essays. Part one asks you to identify five terms or concepts and to state their historical significance. In part two, you write two comprehensive essays (or two short essays, we’ll decide as the final gets near) in which you incorporate all of your accumulated wisdom. As you did in your midterm, you will back up your arguments with specific examples drawn from your readings, lectures, discussions, and films. The questions will be drawn mainly from material since the midterm. A blue book is required (no scantron here either).

Extra credit: You may choose any of the novels I will be recommending to you and do an analysis of the novel where you place the novel into historical perspective.

You will receive study guides with sample questions before the midterm and the final.

Who is the target audience?
  • College and University Students
  • Anyone
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Curriculum For This Course
Expand All 7 Lectures Collapse All 7 Lectures 13:38:15
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My First Section
4 Lectures 00:08
History of Mexico From Colonization To Present
1 page

History of Mexico - Fall 2012

History of Mexico is a general survey of the History of Mexico from its pre-conquest origins to the present. We will explore the social, political, and economic transformations of the country, paying particular attention to the impact of poverty and health issues on the everyday lives of the Mexican people. It also looks at the way Mexico’s economic and political relationship to the rest of the world –particularly to the United States—has shaped the nation.

Required Readings:

The books listed below are required reading for this course and are available for purchase at the UCLA bookstore.

1) MacLachlan, Colin M., and Beezley, William H. El Gran Pueblo: A History of Greater Mexico. Prentice Hall, 1999.

2) Altman, Ida, Cline, Sarah, and Pescador, Juan Javier. The Early History of Greater Mexico. Prentice Hall, 2003.

Sam Quiñones, True Tales from Another Mexico: The Lynch Mob, The Popsicle Kings, Chalino, and the Bronx (University of New Mexico Press, 2001)

3. Meyer and Sherman, a novel, and “Chalino, Popsicle kings…”

A good dictionary is highly recommended.

In addition, I will e-mail you a few recent documents and a few newspaper articles that will bring us up to date on some of the topics we will be discussing. These will also be posted here on our Course website. All of these handouts/articles are required reading as well.

Given that there is so much material to sort through in this course, my lectures are designed to help you understand the “big picture” first and foremost. We will identify the patterns of human activity and then add layers of complexity with more details and examples. Otherwise, we run the danger of not seeing the forest for the trees and we’ll be faced with a frustrating exercise in trying to sort through seemingly endless lists of names, dates, places, etc… Thus, my lectures and the readings overlap but do not parallel one another. Consistent attendance in lectures and participation in discussion sections is essential to understanding the course themes, the readings and films, and of course, to performing well in the class.

I will place copies of the books on two-hour reserve at the library for your use.

Students with disabilities who may need accommodations in this class are encouraged to notify the instructor and contact Disabled Students Programs and Services (DSP&S) early in the semester so that reasonable accommodations may be implemented as soon as possible. Students may contact DSP&S in person.

The counseling center periodically has valuable workshops on topics ranging from effective note-taking, test-taking, and reading strategies. See their bulletin board for dates and times.

Course Requirements and Expectations

The final course grade will be calculated based on the following components:

1. Attendance (5%)- The most straightforward component of your grade. Everyone starts out with 100 and six points are taken off for each unexcused absence.

2. Interactive Journal (10%)- You will write a series of short thought pieces in which you show your understanding of the concepts and themes being explored in the course and how your readings and films relate to them. I will give you the topics or questions and you will either write them in class or bring your written responses to class prepared to discuss them with your peers and myself. You will receive feedback on your responses during our discussions. You will title, date, and keep them all together in order (this will include your written responses to the films as well) and turn them all in on the last day of class.

3. Class Participation (10%)- In order to fully comprehend the complexities of all of our material and to see how each of our themes or topics fits into the “larger picture”, you will have a series of designated class discussions in which we devote class time to exploring our course themes and how our readings and films relate to them. You will, in turn, receive credit for your verbal contributions and active listening in our group and class discussions. Because discussions are only productive when you have completed the readings, seen the films, and have your journal responses ready, you will not receive credit for this portion if you do not come to class prepared.

4. Map Quiz (5%) The first is a map quiz in which you identify the Mexican states and is worth 5% of your grade. These questions are multiple-choice

5. Film Analysis (15%)- A 3 to 5 page analysis of any one of the themes we have studied during class. Your task will be to place the film into historical context, assesses its strengths and weaknesses as a historical document, and provide an overview of the ways that the film contributes to our understanding of the history of the region at that time. Please feel free to consult me at any time during the course of this project. I’d be happy to provide you with feedback. This one is due the last day of class.

6. Midterm Exam (25%)- This exam will be comprised of identification of terms and concepts, one short essay, and one longer and comprehensive essay. Part one asks you to identify four terms or concepts and to state their historical significance. Part two asks you to write a short essay on a topic I assign to you. In part three, you will to incorporate all of the knowledge you have accumulated from your readings, lectures, discussions, and films into a comprehensive essay. The midterm covers material from our lectures, films, and readings since day one. A blue book is required (no scantron for this one). It can be purchased at the bookstore.

7. Final Exam (30%)- This exam will be comprised of identification of terms and concepts and two comprehensive essays. Part one asks you to identify five terms or concepts and to state their historical significance. In part two, you write two comprehensive essays (or two short essays, we’ll decide as the final gets near) in which you incorporate all of your accumulated wisdom. As you did in your midterm, you will back up your arguments with specific examples drawn from your readings, lectures, discussions, and films. The questions will be drawn mainly from material since the midterm

Extra credit: You may choose any of the novels I will be recommending to you and do an analysis of the novel where you place the novel into historical perspective.

You will receive study guides with sample questions before the midterm and the final.

There will be no make-ups for any of the examinations. No incompletes will be given. (Verified emergencies provide the only exceptions to these policies.)

Week 1

1/27-1/31 Introduction. Have in writing for next class, journal entry #1, part 1: your written impressions of the following quotes:

1)“Until lions have their own historians, the hunter will always be glorified” Ethiopian proverb

2)“Our past is only a little less uncertain than our future, and like the future, it is always changing, always revealing and concealing.” Danial Boorstin, Hidden History

3)“Our only duty to history is to rewrite it.” Oscar Wilde

4)“The past is never dead. It’s not even past.” William Faulkner Requiem for a Nun (Act I, Scene III)

5)“Getting History wrong is part of being a nation” Ernest Renan

How do we know what we know?; Historiography (the history of the history of the region)

Class discussion. Topic: quotes on history

Journal entry #, part 2: Further reflection of these ideas in light of our class discussion today.

Suggested Supplementary Readings: Said, Edward. Orientalism. New York: Vintage Books, 1979. Gary B. Nash, Charlotte Crabtree, and Ross E. Dunn, History on Trial: Culture Wars and the Teaching of the Past ( New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1997)

Week 2

2/3-2/7 Native societies on the eve of the Conquest

Read: Altman, et. al., chapters 1 and 2

Film: “The Buried Mirror: Conflict of the Gods”

Suggested Supplementary Readings: David Carrasco, Daily Life of the Aztecs: People of the Sun (Westport, Conn., 1998); MacLachlan, Colin M., and Rodriguez O., Jaime E. The Forging of the Cosmic Race: A Reinterpretation of Colonial Mexico. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1990.

Week 3

2/10-2/14 Invasion, Conquest, and Settlement of Mexico

Read: Altman, et. al. (this is The Early History of Greater Mexico), chapters 3 and 4

“Latin America’s Indigenous Saint (Juan Diego) Stirs Anger, Pride”, article to be handed out

Group and Class Discussion on Conquest and Narratives of Conquest

Suggested Supplementary Readings: Diamond, Jared, Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies (New York: W. W. Norton, 1997); James Lockhart, The Nahuas After the Conquest: A Social and Cultural History of the Indians of Central Mexico, Sixteenth Through Eighteenth Centuries (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1992)

Week 4

2/17-2/21 The Colonial Economy; Encomiendas

Read: Altman, et. al., chapters 5, 8 and 9

Map Quiz (W)

Bring a Scantron and a #2 Pencil

Week 5

2/24-2/28 Christianity, Change and Continuity in Native Societies, and the forging of the “Cosmic Race”

Read: Altman, et. al., chapters 6, 7 and 10

Group and Class Discussions on chapters 5-10

Recommended novel: Rosario Castellanos, The Book of Lamentations (New York: Marsilio Publishing, 1996)

Recommended film: “I, the Worst of All”, Maria Louisa Bemberg's film on Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz.

For further reading: Shroeder, Susan, Stephanie Wood, and Robert Haskett, eds. Indian Women of Early Mexico. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997.

Week 6

3/3 –3/7 Late Colonial changes and the move to independence

Read: Altman, et. al., chapters 11-18

For further reading: Van Young, Eric. The Other Rebellion: Popular Violence, Ideology, and the Mexican Struggle for Independence, 1810-1821. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2001.

Week 7

3/10-3/14 Instability, Pastry Wars, and Invasions: Mexico from the 1820’s to the 1850’s

Read: M&B (this is El Gran Pueblo), ch.’s 1 and 2

Juarez, the French Invasion and Cinco de Mayo: The Wars of the Reform, 1850’s-1870’s

Read: M&B, ch. 3

Week 8

3/17-3/21 Railroads, Rurales, and “Order and Progess”: The “Modernization” of Mexico, 1876-1910

Read: M&B, ch. 4

Skeletons, dispossessed natives, and the ossification of Liberalism: The costs of the “Modernization” of Mexico, 1876-1910

Read: M&B, ch. 5

Suggested Supplementary Readings: William H. Beezley, Judas at the Jockey Club and Other Episodes of

Porfirian Mexico (University of Nebraska Press, 1987); John Mason Hart, Empire and Revolution: The Americans in Mexico since theCivil War (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002).

Week 9

3/24-3/28 The Liberal Order Collapses: The Mexican Revolution, 1910-1917

Read: M&B, ch.’s 6 and 7

Film: “Viva Zapata!”

Suggested Supplementary Readings: John Mason Hart, Revolutionary Mexico: The Coming and Process of the Mexican Revolution (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1987); Alan Knight, The Mexican Revolution, 2 volumes (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1986); Friedrich Katz, The Life and Times of Pancho Villa (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1998); John Womack, Zapata and the Mexican Revolution; Samuel Brunk, Zapata! (University of New Mexico Press)

Week 10

3/31-4/4 Midterm Examination

Class and Group discussions “Viva Zapata!”

Week 11

4/7-4/11 “Institutionalizing” the Revolution, 1917 to 1937; and Binding “Many” Mexicos into one?

Read: M&B, ch.’s 8 and 9, and

Educating Mexico’s Indians” article to be handed out

The Revolution Becomes “The Miracle”: The Drive for Urban and Industrial

Mexico, 1937-1946

Read: M&B, ch. 10

Recommended novel: Lopez y Fuentes, Gregorio. El Indio. New York: Continuum, 1994.

For further reading: Ochoa, Enrique C. Feeding Mexico: The Political Uses of Food since 1910. Wilmington, Del.: Scholarly Resources, 2000.

Week 12

4/14-4/18 Spring Break- No Classes

Week 13

4/21-4/25 The Death of the Mexican Revolution? 1946-1972

Read: M&B, ch. 11

Mexico from Boom to Crisis, the mid 70’s to 1982

Read: M&B, ch. 12, pp’s 421-445

Recommended Film: “The Last Zapatista”

Recommended Novel: Hector Aguilar Camín, La Guerra de Galío (Galío’s War)

Suggested Supplementary Readings: Enrique Krauze, Mexico: Biography of Power (New York: Harpercollins, 1997); Gilbert M. Joseph and Daniel Nugent, eds., Everyday Forms of State Formation: Revolution and the Negotiation of Rule in Modern Mexico (Durham: Duke University Press, 1994); Stephen D. Morris, Corruption and Politics in Contemporary Mexico (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1991)

Week 14

The Economic Crisis of 1982 and the "Lost Decade"

Read: M&B, ch. 12, pp’s 445-451 and articles to be handed out

For further reading: Judith Teichman, Policymaking in Mexico: From Boom to Crisis (Boston: Allen & Unwin, 1988); Judith A. Teichman, Privatization and Political Change in Mexico (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1995);

Neo-Liberalism challenged: “Superbarrio” and the Zapatista uprising

Read: M&B, ch. 12, pp’s 451-487 and articles to be handed out

“The Rapid Rise of NeoBanqueros: Mexico’s New Financial Elite”

“From North Atlantic NeoLiberalism to Market Pluralism” Salinas and Mangabeira: Poverty in Mexico

Week 15

Film: “The Sixth Sun: Mayan Uprising in Chiapas”: Corn and Health Issue Topics analyzed.

Read: “Mexico’s Indians: One Nation or Many?” The Economist

First World, Ha, Ha, Ha!, short article by Elaine Katzenberger

Group and class discussions on the film and articles on the Zapatista Uprising

Suggested Supplementary Readings: Neil Harvey, The Chiapas Rebellion: The Struggle for Land and Democracy (Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1998); John Womack, Rebellion in Chiapas: An Historical Reader (New York: The New Press, 1999); Hayden, Tom, ed. The Zapatista Reader. New York: Thunder's Mouth Press/Nation Books, 2002; Andres Oppenheimer, Bordering on Chaos: Guerrillas, Stockbrokers, Politicians, and Mexico’s Road to Prosperity (New York: Little, Brown &Co., 1996); Jorge G. Castañeda The Mexican Shock (The New Press, 1995); Carlos Fuentes, A New Time for Mexico (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1996); Elaine Katzenberger, First World, Ha, Ha, Ha!

Week 16

Film: “Traffic” and discussion

Readings to be handed out.

Week 17

A New Era for Mexico: Mexico in the 21st Century

Read: M&B, ch. 12, pp’s 488-493 and articles to be handed out:

“Congress Shifts Mexico's Balance of Power” NYT art. 2/22/02

“Mexican Workers Pay for Success: With Labor Costs Rising, Factories Depart for Asia” Washington Post art. 6/20/02

Mexico's Corrupt Oil Lifeline" (NY Times 1/21/03)

Suggested Supplementary Readings: Sam Quiñones, True Tales from Another Mexico: The Lynch Mob, the Popsicle Kings, Chalino, and the Bronx (University of New Mexico Press)

Finals Week

Finals Week. No classes this week. Your final: Wednesday, May 28, 9:30-11:30

Films to incorporate into the syllabus:

3. “Mexico: Revolution, 1910-1940” A documentary tracing the “institutionalization” of the Revolution. Footage from the period.

[Grossmont College owns a copy, you can view it in the LRC in the library, Code: MV 2752]

4. “Mexico: From Boom to Bust, 1940-1982” Second part in this series, tracing Mexico’s “Revolution” from its industrialization efforts to the oil boom and its bust.

5. “Mexico: The End of an Era, 1982-1988” Third part in this series, tracing the jarring changes that shook Mexico after the 1982 financial crisis, Mexico’s worst “crisis” since its Revolution.

Additional Suggested Supplementary Readings

Ruben Martínez, Crossing Over: A Mexican Family on the Migrant Trail (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2001); Bad Language, Naked Ladies, and Other Threats to the Nation : A Political History of Comic Books in Mexico (Duke University Press).

History Of Mexico from Precolonial Times To Present: The Aztec % Mayan Empires
4 pages

This Course focuses on the causes consequences of the Mexican revolution of 1910. Required Readings:

The books listed below are required reading for this course and are available for purchase at the Grossmont College bookstore. You may also want to contact Ross books at the Vons shopping center on Navajo and Fanita to see if you can get a better price there (619) 698-2665.

1) MacLachlan, Colin M., and Beezley, William H. El Gran Pueblo: A History of Greater Mexico. Prentice Hall, 1999.

2) Altman, Ida, Cline, Sarah, and Pescador, Juan Javier. The Early History of Greater Mexico. Prentice Hall, 2003.

Sam Quiñones, True Tales from Another Mexico: The Lynch Mob, The Popsicle Kings, Chalino, and the Bronx (University of New Mexico Press, 2001)

Women in Global Perspective
5 pages

In Mexico, by 1983, the statist solution had left civil society and communities in poverty, albeit , as in Romania, with subsidies from the central government to support the country's corrupt one-party political system. With the collapse in demand for oil and raw materials owing to the world downturn after the Arab oil embargoes and quintupling of energy prices in the 1970s, Mexico was unable to borrow international funds, thus "bankrupting" efficient private industry as well as highly inefficient subsidized statist enterprises. Subsequent shrinkage of subsidies caused increasing crisis in the living standards for the thousands of Mexico's communities in which the only basis for funding had been the central government. With the decline in size of state economic power, then, the state itself has barely been able to cope with the series of recurring economic collapses caused by earlier central government mismanagement of nationalized industries.

Incapacity of the statists to maintain their corrupt systems changed dramatically after the fall of the Berlin War in 1989. The unmasking of the Soviet system and its 1991 collapse revealed it to be a negative development model, not ideal model that ideologues believed to have existed. Now free to act, anti-statists unleashed rapid change in the old Communist World.

As central government has been "downsized" to end its economic distortions, civil societies and its communities (figurative as well as literal) in all countries subsequently have faced a shortage of what little funds centralism had allocated leaving a shortfall in the safety net in relatively wealthy countries such as the USA and Sweden. Even the rich Germany faces the need to cut welfare benefits in order to reduce its labor costs or see the further flight of factories to such countries as Romania.

"Anti-statism" in Mexico and Romania took different routes from 1989 to 1997. In Mexico, anti-statism started under de la Madrid but it was very timid, namely through deregulation. President Carlos Salinas de Gortari (1988-1994) was aided by events in Russia, which paralyzed his opposition and permitted acceleration of decentralization of state activity as well as sale and closure of inefficient industry. Another important aid was the rise of civil society in the 1980s as it had to cope with problems clearly beyond government to solve. A series of events like the rise of independent civil movements, beginning with student's revolt of 1968, and the women's rights movement, continuing with the mobilization of the entire population to provide relief from the devastating 1985 earthquake that hit Mexico city (Sáiz, México 75 años de Revolución, 1988, p. 564.) In trying to reconstruct the city, housing, providing medical care, employment, the civic organizations took their own decisions and sometimes they just went beyond and ignored the government.

Romania, meanwhile, officially took the view from 1989 to 1997 that some statism could prevail, albeit in disguise. Although Ceausescu was overthrown and executed, those actions may have been led by his cronies, who sought to save themselves from the growing anger of the populace.

Simultaneously, the globalization of free trade markets espoused since the 1980s by U.S. President Reagan and UK. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher gained force by 1989. The Reagan-Thatcher policy drew upon the jet passenger and air cargo shrinking of geographical distances (triumphant in the 1970s) to capitalize on the instant telecommunications via private telephone, fax, and computer (triumphant in the 1980s) to breakdown national barriers. Those barriers have become increasingly irrelevant with the rise of Internet connectivity and the privatization of airline and telephone communication systems triumphed in the 1990s.

The Concomitant Rise of Civil Society and the Role of NGOs

To match the demise of statism, civil society has arisen in its own right to assume growing importance depending on the country, the USA providing the strongest example mainly because the state never gained the power that it came to hold in Europe and England.

The basic notion of civil society is that the people can and should prevent the state from becoming authoritarian by keeping watch on it while at the same time demand that it work properly for the general population. By definition civil society should also develop non-state activities.

The Mexican Electoral System: Free Trade Arrangements & Syllabus
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The Mexican Judicial System: Comparative Analisys
2 Lectures 00:00
Mexico: Multiple Dangers in Modern Day Mexico: Kidnappings & Drugs
1 page

This Course is about understanding the Mexican legislative system, how it works, and how does it compare to the United States.

-Napoleonic Code

Amparo vs habeas Corpus in the U.S.

Obstacles for Development in Mexico:

14) High rate of illiteracy.

16)Northern European migrants not admitted to New Spain & after 1810 migrants avoid violent Mexico. Rather they go to America with their knowledge with their ideas of expanding Industrial, Tec, Educational Revolutions.

16) Culture of domination by one group to 1910

a) Aztecs, then b) Viceroy/Church, then

c) Generals, 1810-- d) French Army 1861-66

& Maximilian 1864-1967, e) Porfirio Díaz

The AMPARO and Habeas Corpus
1 page
+
Origins of Flue in Mexico
1 Lecture 00:00

Globalization and Mexico

Mexican Village, Taylor Farms
806 pages
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Mexico's FTAs
0 Lectures 00:00
About the Instructor
Author Olga Lazin Andrei
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10 Students
2 Courses
, Ph.D in History earned at UCLA

Dr Olga Lazin has been teaching History at UCLA, Cal State University of Dominguez Hills, Santa Monica College, CSU Log Beach, West Los Angeles, College, Camino Colleg, for the past 30 years. She earned her M.A. and Ph.D. in History from UCLA in 2001, and is a prominent writer. Her speciality is Globalization of free trade markets, history of nutrition, philanthropy, civil and civic society in Latin America, United States of America & Eastern Europe, as well as Gender Studies. Her books can be downloaded online from: Dr Lazin's Web page

See my Introductory video here: Dr Olga Lazin-Andrei's Video