Rhetoric for Writing and Communication Strategy
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Rhetoric for Writing and Communication Strategy

Rhetoric (the Good Kind!)
3.2 (3 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
15 students enrolled
Created by Mark N. Clemente
Last updated 7/2017
English
Current price: $10 Original price: $30 Discount: 67% off
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Includes:
  • 31 mins on-demand video
  • 2 Articles
  • 3 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Develop strategic communications to move others to action in order to achieve your communication or business objectives. Also, how to plan your communications systematically by identifying exactly “what to say/write” and “how to say/write it.”
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • There are no required materials or software for students. There is only one prerequisite: students must have a desire to become more effective communicators, writers, and speakers—and to want to think and plan like a true communication strategist
Description

"Rhetoric” has gotten a bad name. Today, it refers only to misinformation, untruthful communications, or propaganda. But “classical rhetoric” is actually the study of effective writing and speaking—and it’s been taught for more than 2,500 years since the time of Aristotle and ancient Greece. The proven tactics and strategies of classical rhetoric are a powerful means of developing strategic communications, as well as improving one's writing and presentation skills. This advanced course is designed for professionals in the "persuasion" businesses of advertising, marketing, sales, public relations, fundraising, lobbying, and law. The course is based on the author's business eBook, "Winning Through the Art of Words," which is offered as supporting course material.

Who is the target audience?
  • Professional communicators in the "persuasion" businesses of advertising, PR, marketing, sales, fund-raising, politics, lobbying, and law. Also, senior executives who want to communicate better with their employees and stakeholders.
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Curriculum For This Course
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Introduction: Rhetoric (the Good Kind!)
1 Lecture 02:49

“Rhetoric” has gotten a bad name. Today, it refers only to misinformation, untruthful communications, or propaganda. But “classical rhetoric” is actually the study of effective writing and speaking—and it’s been around for more than 2,500 years since the time of Aristotle and ancient Greece. The tactics and strategies of classical rhetoric are a powerful means of improving business communications, as well as general writing and presentation skills. This lecture sets up the entire course and outlines the benefits you’ll gain upon completing it.  

Preview 02:49

About Classical Rhetoric
1 question
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Rhetorical Analysis & Research: An Overview
2 Lectures 06:40

Before writing or speaking a word, first things first: you cannot create effective communications unless you first understand the people to whom you’re speaking or writing. In this lecture you’ll learn ways to research your audience with a focus on its most important characteristics while, at the same time, laying the groundwork for effective messaging.

Preview 03:58

There is a specific type of research to conduct when applying classical rhetoric. It’s called “invention” or “discovery” because you discover the ideas you want to communicate for maximum impact, and you invent your approach to presenting messages in creative and compelling ways. This lecture introduces the 3 main areas of rhetorical research where you learn to “build believability, leverage logic and evoke emotion.”

Rhetorical Research & Messaging
02:42

The Goal of Rhetorical Research
1 question
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Communication Strategy Development
4 Lectures 14:51

This lecture discusses the first area of rhetorical research and communication strategy development. “Ethos”—also known as the ethical appeal—involves forging communication strategy and messages based on establishing credibility … your own or that of someone you’re representing (eg, a client, a candidate).


Building Believability
03:06

This lecture will show you how to craft communication strategy based on logical reasoning and by appealing to your audience’s intelligence. You will see how research related to “logos” involves formulating statements that lead to sound conclusions. And you’ll learn a simple yet powerful means of building a logical argument.

Preview 04:02

In this lecture you’ll learn strategies to arouse an audience’s emotions in order to move them to action. Rhetorical research and communication strategy related to “pathos”—or the emotional appeal—represents the earliest known study of human psychology. You will learn about the different types of human emotions and how to find ways to tap into them for persuasive writing and speech.

Evoking Emotion
03:47

This lectures teaches you how to “put it all together”—that is, to take the strategies you’ve developed through your rhetorical research and audience analysis and “arrange” your ideas for maximum communication impact. You’ll also learn the imperatives for effective outlining to organize your thoughts, messages, and creative ideas.

Preview 03:56

Messaging Strategy
1 question
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More Insights On Messaging
2 Lectures 00:33

This article lecture supports the earlier lectures on “Rhetorical Research.” It lends additional insights into the process of determining “what you want to say and how you want to say it.”

Aristotle’s “Topics” for Developing Strategies of Persuasion
00:21

This article lecture examines Aristotle’s theories of human character based on people’s age and “stage of life.” His insights are still relevant 2500 years after they were set forth. This article relates to Lecture 2 on “Audience Analysis.”

 

Human Character: The Classical Rhetorical View
00:12
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Course Conclusion
2 Lectures 06:56

This lesson summarizes the main principles of classical rhetoric as they pertain to effective writing and communication strategy. It recounts the course guidance as it applies to business communication situations requiring persuasive writing and speech. A 3-part class project is described.

Course Conclusion & Discussion of Class Project
02:48

In this lecture, the instructor provides real-life examples of applying classical rhetoric in devising business communication strategies. The examples tie directly to the preceding course content.

Preview 04:08
About the Instructor
Mark N. Clemente
3.6 Average rating
4 Reviews
21 Students
2 Courses
Writer and business communication strategist

Mark N. Clemente, MA is an award-winning writer, communication consultant, and corporate trainer. He is the author of five books and dozens of journal articles and research studies on business communication.

Mark has served as a senior writer in the advertising and PR units of the renowned communications agency, Ogilvy & Mather. He has also held senior communication positions with such firms as Alexander & Alexander Consulting Group, Coopers & Lybrand, and Howard J. Rubenstein Associates. As a consultant in corporate and organizational communication, his clients have included Alcatel-Lucent, The Boston Consulting Group, Novartis, IBM, Aon Consulting, CSC, and Deloitte & Touche.

An internationally recognized speaker, Mark has conducted workshops for such groups as the American Management Association, the Association for Corporate Growth, Cornell University School of Law, International School of Management, the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), and the Strategic Research Institute.

Mark has been an editorial contributor to prominent business journals and has been published and quoted widely in such publications as IndustryWeek, Human Resource Executive, The New York Times, the Washington Post, Harvard Management Update, Sales & Marketing Management, Merger & Acquisition Advisor and Executive Leadership.

Mark holds a master's degree in strategic communication, and has taught college-level courses in speech communication and sociology.