Quicklessons Piano Course - Learn to Play Piano by Ear!

Imagine playing piano by ear. How would that improve your music? Understand the theory and improvise your own songs.
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  • Lectures 144
  • Length 8.5 hours
  • Skill Level All Levels
  • Languages English
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About This Course

Published 4/2014 English

Course Description

With over 8 hours of high-quality piano lessons, Quicklessons is one of the most exhaustive piano courses on Udemy.com. Perfect for beginner and intermediate students, this course is taught by award-winning composer/pianist Ozie Cargile.

These tutorials will focus on the skills needed to write and improvise your own music. Each lesson is clear and concise, shown from an up-close point of view so that you can easily see everything the instructor is doing.

With daily practice, you’ll learn all the scales and chords for every key, and the music theory behind them so that you can quickly put great melodies and harmonies together.

You’ll even learn to read charts while studying a variety of chord progressions from popular music genres including Rock, Pop, RnB, Hip Hop, Classical, Gospel and Jazz. This combined with ear-training sessions and tips for singer/songwriters makes Quicklessons the best online course for learning how to play like a pro in no time.

Sign-up today and learn to play!

What are the requirements?

  • A piano or keyboard with at least 61 keys (5 octaves)
  • Time to practice

What am I going to get from this course?

  • The basics of music theory on piano
  • How to play all major and minor scales and chords for every key
  • Chord progressions for a wide range of songs and music genres
  • How to put melodies and harmonies together
  • Improvisation and music expansion techniques
  • Solfege and ear-training sessions
  • How to read chord charts and sheet music
  • Great tips for singers and songwriters
  • Lots of fun!

What is the target audience?

  • Anyone that wants to learn piano (from beginner to intermediate)
  • Piano and music teachers looking for reference materials
  • Composers and songwriters looking to expand their musical ideas

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee.

Forever yours.
Lifetime access.

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android.

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section 1: Getting Started
04:35

The piano is a musical instrument played mainly by means of a keyboard. It is one of the most popular instruments in the world. Widely used in classical and jazz music for solo performances, ensemble use, chamber music and accompaniment, the piano is also very popular as an aid to composing and rehearsal. Although not portable and often expensive, the piano's versatility and ubiquity have made it one of the world's most familiar musical instruments.

Pressing a key on the piano's keyboard causes a felt-covered hammer to strike steel strings. The hammers rebound, allowing the strings to continue vibrating at their resonant frequency. These vibrations are transmitted through a bridge to a sounding board that more efficiently couples the acoustic energy to the air. The sound would otherwise be no louder than that directly produced by the strings. When the key is released, a damper stops the string's vibration. See the article on Piano key frequencies for a picture of the piano keyboard and the location of middle-C. In the Hornbostel-Sachs system of instrument classification, pianos are considered chordophones.

The word piano is a shortened form of pianoforte (PF), the Italian word for the instrument (which in turn derives from the previous terms gravicembalo col piano e forte and fortepiano). The musical terms piano and forte mean quiet and loud, and in this context refers to the variations in volume of sound the instrument produces in response to a pianist's touch on the keys: the greater a key press's velocity, the greater the force of the hammer hitting the string(s), and the louder the note produced.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piano

03:26

Practice Makes Improvement

01:01

When the G-clef is placed on the second line of the stave, it is called the treble clef. This is the most common clef used today, and the only G-clef still in use. For this reason, the terms G-clef and treble clef are often seen as synonymous. It was formerly also known as the violin clef. The treble clef was historically used to mark a treble, or pre-pubescent, voice part.

When the F-clef is placed on the fourth line, it is called the bass clef. This is the only F-clef used today, so that the terms F-clef and bass clef are often regarded as synonymous.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treble_clef#Treble_clef

04:01

Almost every modern piano has 52 white keys and 36 black keys for a total of 88 keys (seven octaves plus a minor third, from A0 to C8). Many older pianos only have 85 keys (seven octaves from A0 to A7). The highest-quality piano manufacturers extend the range further in one or both directions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piano_keys#Keyboard

04:34

In music, an accidental is a note whose pitch (or pitch class) is not a member of a scale or mode indicated by the most recently applied key signature. In musical notation, the symbols used to mark such notes, sharps (♯), flats (♭), and naturals (♮), may also be called accidentals. An accidental sign raises or lowers the following note from its normal pitch ignoring sharps or flats in the key signature, usually by a semitone, although microtonal music may use "fractional" accidental signs, and one occasionally sees double sharps or flats, which raise or lower the indicated note by a whole tone. Accidentals apply within the measure and octave in which they appear, unless canceled by another accidental sign, or tied into a following measure.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sharps_and_flats

04:06

In music, fingering is the choice of which fingers and hand positions to use when playing certain musical instruments. Fingering typically changes throughout a piece; the challenge of choosing good fingering for a piece is to make the hand movements as comfortable as possible without changing hand position too often. A fingering can be the result of the working process of the composer, who puts it into the manuscript, an editor, who adds it into the printed score, or the performer, who puts his or her own fingering in the score or in performance. A substitute fingering is an alternative to the indicated fingering, not to be confused with finger substitution.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fingering

02:23

A melody is a linear succession of musical tones which is perceived as a single entity. It also is an exponential succession of musical tones which is perceived as two entities. In its most literal sense, a melody is a combination of pitch and rhythm, while, more figuratively, the term has occasionally been extended to include successions of other musical elements such as tone color. It may be considered the foreground to the background accompaniment. A line or part need not be a foreground melody.

Melodies often consist of one or more musical phrases or motifs, and are usually repeated throughout a song or piece in various forms. Melodies may also be described by their melodic motion or the pitches or the intervals between pitches (predominantly conjunct or disjunct or with further restrictions), pitch range, tension and release, continuity and coherence, cadence, and shape.

n music, harmony is the use of simultaneous pitches (tones, notes), or chords. The study of harmony involves chords and their construction and chord progressions and the principles of connection that govern them. Harmony is often said to refer to the "vertical" aspect of music, as distinguished from melodic line, or the "horizontal" aspect. Counterpoint, which refers to the interweaving of melodic lines, and polyphony, which refers to the relationship of separate independent voices, are thus sometimes distinguished from harmony.

In popular and jazz harmony, chords are named by their root plus various terms and characters indicating their qualities. In many types of music, notably baroque, romantic, modern and jazz, chords are often augmented with "tensions". A tension is an additional chord member that creates a relatively dissonant interval in relation to the bass. Typically, in the classical Common practice period a dissonant chord (chord with tension) will "resolve" to a consonant chord. Harmonization usually sounds pleasant to the ear when there is a balance between the consonant and dissonant sounds. In simple words, that occurs when there is a balance between "tense" and "relaxed" moments.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melody

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harmony

06:29

In music theory, an interval is a combination of two notes, or the ratio between their frequencies. Two-note combinations are also called dyads. Although chords are often defined as sets of three or more notes, intervals are sometimes considered to be the simplest kind of chord.

Intervals may be described as:

Horizontal, linear, or melodic if they sound successively.

Vertical or harmonic, if the two notes sound simultaneously

In Western culture, the most common method to classify and name intervals is based on their quality (perfect, major, minor, etc.) and number (unison, second, third, etc.). For instance, two frequently used types of interval are called minor third and major third.

Minute intervals (commas, and microtones) can be formed by the notes of musical scales containing more than 12 pitches (e.g., by the notes A♭ and G♯ found in some extended scales), or by two notes of the same name, but tuned differently (e.g., the syntonic comma is sometimes defined as the difference between an F♯ tuned using the D♭ased Pythagorean system, and another F♯ tuned using the D♭ased quarter-comma meantone system). The difference in pitch can be so small that it cannot be perceived.

tp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_interval

05:18

In music theory, the circle of fifths (or circle of fourths) is a visual representation of the relationships among the 12 tones of the chromatic scale, their corresponding key signatures, and the associated major and minor keys. More specifically, it is a geometrical representation of relationships among the 12 pitch classes of the chromatic scale in pitch class space.

The term 'fifth' defines an interval or mathematical ratio which is the closest and most consonant non-octave interval. The circle of fifths is a sequence of pitches or key tonalities, represented as a circle, in which the next pitch is found seven semitones higher than the last. Musicians and composers use the circle of fifths to understand and describe the musical relationships among some selection of those pitches. The circle's design is helpufl in composing and harmonizing melodies, building chords, and moving to different keys within a composition.

At the top of the circle, the key of C Major has no sharps or flats. Starting from the apex and proceeding clockwise by ascending fifths, the key of G has one sharp, the key of D has 2 sharps, and so on. Similarly, proceeding counterclockwise from the apex by descending fifths, the key of F has one flat, the key of B♭ has 2 flats, and so on. At the bottom of the circle, the sharp and flat keys overlap, showing pairs of enharmonic key signatures.

Starting at any pitch, ascending by the interval of an equal tempered fifth, one passes all twelve tones clockwise, to return to the beginning pitch class. To pass the twelve tones counterclockwise, it is necessary to ascend by perfect fourths, rather than fifths.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circle_of_fifths

03:32

Pianos have had pedals, or some close equivalent, since the earliest days. (In the 18th century, some pianos used levers pressed upward by the player's knee instead of pedals.) Most grand pianos in the US have three pedals: the soft pedal (una corda), sostenuto, and sustain pedal (from left to right, respectively), while in Europe, the standard is two pedals: the soft pedal and the sustain pedal. Most modern upright pianos also have three pedals: soft pedal, practice pedal and sustain pedal, though older or cheaper models may lack the practice pedal. In Europe the standard for upright pianos is two pedals: the soft and the sustain pedals.

Notations used for the sustain pedal in sheet music

The sustain pedal (or, damper pedal) is often simply called the pedal, since it is the most frequently used. It is placed as the rightmost pedal in the group. It lifts the dampers from all keys, sustaining all played notes. In addition, it alters the overall tone by allowing all strings, including those not directly played, to reverberate.

The soft pedal or una corda pedal is placed leftmost in the row of pedals. In grand pianos it shifts the entire action/keyboard assembly to the right (a very few instruments have shifted left) so that the hammers hit two of the three strings for each note. In the earliest pianos whose unisons were bichords rather than trichords, the action shifted so that hammers hit a single string, hence the name una corda, or 'one string'. The effect is to soften the note as well as change the tone. In uprights this action is not possible; instead the pedal moves the hammers closer to the strings, allowing the hammers to strike with less kinetic energy. This produces a slightly softer sound, but no change in timbre.

On grand pianos, the middle pedal is a sostenuto pedal. This pedal keeps raised any damper already raised at the moment the pedal is depressed. This makes it possible to sustain selected notes (by depressing the sostenuto pedal before those notes are released) while the player's hands are free to play additional notes (which aren't sustained). This can be useful for musical passages with pedal points and other otherwise tricky or impossible situations.

On many upright pianos, the middle pedal is called the practice or celeste pedal. This drops a piece of felt between the hammers and strings, greatly muting the sounds. This pedal can be shifted while depressed, into a locking position.

There are also non-standard variants. On some pianos (grands and verticals), the middle pedal can be a bass sustain pedal: that is, when it is depressed, the dampers lift off the strings only in the bass section. Players use this pedal to sustain a single bass note or chord over many measures, while playing the melody in the treble section. On the Stuart and Sons piano as well as the largest Fazioli piano, there is a fourth pedal to the left of the principal three. This fourth pedal works in the same way as the soft pedal of an upright piano, moving the hammers closer to the strings.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piano_keys#Pedals

Section 2: Learning Scales
06:26

In music, a scale is any sequence of musical notes in an ascending or descending order. Sometimes, scales contain both an ascending and a descending portion.

Often, especially in the context of the common practice period, part or all of a musical work including melody and/or harmony, is built using the notes of a single scale, which can be conveniently represented on a staff with a standard key signature.

The notes of a scale are ordered in pitch or pitch class. A measure of the distances (or intervals) between pairs of adjacent notes provides a method to classify scales. For instance, a major scale is defined by the interval pattern T-T-S-T-T-T-S, where T stands for whole tone, and S stands for semitone. Based on their interval patterns, scales are divided into categories including diatonic, chromatic, major, minor, and others.

A specific group of notes can be described, for instance, as a C-major scale, D-minor scale, etc.. This takes into account the selection of a special note, also known as the first degree (or tonic, or root) of the scale. For example, C-major indicates a major scale in which C is the tonic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_scale

07:56

In music theory, a diatonic scale is commonly defined as a seven-note, octave-repeating musical scale comprising five whole steps and two half steps for each octave, in which the two half steps are separated from each other by either two or three whole steps. This pattern ensures that, in a diatonic scale spanning more than one octave, all the half steps are maximally separated from each other (i.e. separated by at least two whole steps). Alternative definitions are sometimes used in the literature, which may either include seven-note scales (such as the harmonic minor and the melodic minor ones) which do not meet the definition given above, or exclude some of the scales which meet it. These alternative definitions are discussed elsewhere.

In the theory of Western music, mode (from Latin modus, measure, standard, manner, way, size, limit of quantity, method) (Powers 2001, Introduction; OED) generally refers to a type of scale, coupled with a set of characteristic melodic behaviours. This usage, still the most common in recent years, reflects a tradition dating to the Middle Ages, itself inspired by the theory of ancient Greek music. The word encompasses several additional meanings, however. Authors from the ninth century until the early eighteenth century sometimes employed the Latin modus for interval. In the theory of late-medieval mensural polyphony, modus is a rhythmic relationship between long and short values or a pattern made from them (Powers 2001, Introduction). Since the end of the eighteenth century, the term mode has also applied—in ethnomusicological contexts—to pitch structures in non-European musical cultures, sometimes with doubtful compatibility (Powers 2001, §V,1). Regarding the concept of mode as applied to pitch relationships generally, Harold S. Powers describes a continuum between abstract scale and specific tune, with most of the area between ... being in the domain of mode (Powers 2001, §I,3).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diatonic_scale

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mode_(music)

03:57

In music, relative keys are the major and minor scales that have the same key signatures. A major and minor scale sharing the same key signature are said to be in a relative relationship. The relative minor of a particular major key, or the relative major of a minor key, is the key which has the same key signature but a different tonic; this is as opposed to parallel minor or major, which shares the same tonic. Relative keys are closely related keys, in that they differ by no more than one accidental (none in the case of relative keys), the keys between which most modulations occur.

The minor key starts three semitones below its relative major; for example, A minor is three semitones below its relative, C Major.

G major and E minor both have a single sharp in their key signature at F♯; therefore, E minor is the relative minor of G major, and conversely G major is the relative major of E minor. The tonic of the relative minor is the sixth scale degree of the major scale, while the tonic of the relative major is the third degree of the minor scale. The relative relationship may be visualized through the circle of fifths.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relative_key

03:03

How practice scales.

Section 3: Major Scales
06:16

C major (often just C or key of C) is a musical major scale based on C, with pitches C, D, E, F, G, A, and B. Its key signature has no flats/sharps. Its relative minor is A minor, and its parallel minor is C minor.

C major is often thought of as the simplest key, due to its lack of sharps or flats, and beginning piano students' first pieces are usually simple ones in this key; the first scales and arpeggios that students learn are also usually C major. However, going against this common practice, the Polish composer Frédéric Chopin regarded this scale as the most difficult to play with complete evenness, and he tended to give it last to his students. He regarded B major as the easiest scale to play on the piano, because the position of the black and white notes best fit the natural positions of the fingers, and so he often had students start with this scale. A C major scale lacks black keys and thus does not fit the natural positions of the fingers well.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_major

02:36

D major (or the key of D) is a major scale based on D, consisting of the pitches D, E, F♯, G, A, B, and C♯. Its key signature consists of two sharps. Its relative minor is B minor and its parallel minor is D minor.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D_major

02:40

E major is a major scale based on E, with the pitches E, F♯, G♯, A, B, C♯, and D♯. Its key signature has four sharps (see below: Scales and keys).Its relative minor is C-sharp minor, and its parallel minor is E minor.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E_major

03:03

F major (or the key of F) is a musical major scale based on F, consisting of the pitches F, G, A, B♭, C, D, and E. Its key signature has one flat (see below: Scales and keys). It is by far the oldest key signature with an accidental, predating the others by hundreds of years. Its relative minor is D minor and its parallel minor is F minor.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F_major

02:32

G major (or the key of G) is a major scale based on G, with the pitches G, A, B, C, D, E, and F♯. Its key signature has one sharp, F♯; in treble-clef key signatures, the sharp-symbol for F is usually placed on the first line from the top, though in some Baroque music it is placed on the first space from the bottom (the F one octave below).. Ascending and descending G major scale. G major's relative minor is E minor, and its parallel minor is G minor.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G_major

02:36

A major (or the key of A) is a major scale based on A, with the pitches A, B, C♯, D, E, F♯, and G♯. Its key signature has three sharps. Its relative minor is F-sharp minor and its parallel minor is A minor.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_major

03:40

In music theory, B major is a major scale based on B. The pitches B, C♯, D♯, E, F♯, G♯, and A♯ are all part of the B major scale. Its key signature has five sharps.B major's relative minor is G-sharp minor, its parallel minor is B minor, and its enharmonic equivalent is C-flat major.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B_major

03:47

D-flat major is a major scale based on D-flat, consisting of the pitches D♭, E♭, F, G♭, A♭, B♭ and C. Its key signature has five flats (see below: Scales and keys).

Its relative minor is ♭flat minor. Its parallel minor is D-flat minor, usually replaced by C-sharp minor, since D-flat minor, which would contain a double-flat in the key signature, is rarely used for practical composing and arranging, with a similar problem with C-sharp major. Therefore, D-flat major is quite often used as the parallel major for C-sharp minor.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D_flat_major

03:28

E♭ major or E-flat major is a major scale based on E-flat, consisting of the pitches E♭, F, G, A♭, B♭, C, and D. Its key signature has three flats: B, E, A.

Its relative minor is C minor, and its parallel minor is E♭ minor.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E_flat_major

03:02

F♯ major or F-sharp major is a major scale based on F♯, consisting of the pitches F♯, G♯, A♯, B, C♯, D♯, and E♯. Its key signature has six sharps.

Its relative minor is D♯ minor, and its parallel minor is F♯ minor. Its enharmonic equivalent is G♭ major.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F-sharp_major

03:20

A-flat major is a major scale based on A-flat, consisting of the pitches A♭, B♭, C, D♭, E♭, F, and G. Its key signature has four flats (see below: Scales and keys).

Its relative minor is F minor, and its parallel minor is A-flat minor.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_flat_major

02:46

B♭ major or ♭flat major is a major scale based on ♭flat, consisting of the pitches B♭, C, D, E♭, F, G, and A. Its key signature has two flats, B/E (see below: Scales and keys). Its relative minor is G minor, and its parallel minor is B♭ minor.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B_flat_major

Section 4: Minor Scales
02:25

C minor (abbreviated c or Cm) is a minor scale based on C, consisting of the pitches C, D, E♭, F, G, A♭, and B♭. The harmonic minor raises the B♭ to B♮. Changes needed for the melodic and harmonic versions of the scale are written in with naturals and accidentals as necessary. Its key signature consists of three flats. Its relative major is E-flat major, and its parallel major is C major.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_minor

D minor scale
02:29
02:45

E minor is a minor scale based on the note E. The E natural minor scale (consists of the pitches E, F♯, G, A, B, C, and D. The E harmonic minor scale contains the natural 7, D♯, rather than the flatted 7, D – to align with the major dominant chord, B7 (B D♯ F♯ A).Its key signature has one sharp, F. Its relative major is G major, and its parallel major is E major.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E_minor

03:16

F minor is a minor scale based on F, consisting of the pitches F, G, A♭, B♭, C, D♭, and E♭. The harmonic minor raises the E♭ to E♮. Its key signature has four flats (see below: Scales and keys). Its relative major is A-flat major, and its parallel major is F major.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F_minor

02:34

G minor is a minor scale based on G, consisting of the pitches G, A, B♭, C, D, E♭, and F. For the harmonic minor scale, the F is raised to F♯. Its relative major is ♭flat major, and its parallel major is G major.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G_minor

Mixed Feelings for Violin and Piano on YouTube

02:09

A minor (abbreviated Am) is a minor scale based on A, consisting of the pitches A, B, C, D, E, F, and G. The harmonic minor scale raises the G to G♯. Its key signature has no flats or sharps (see below: Scales and keys). Its relative major is C major, and its parallel major is A major.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_minor

02:46

B minor is a minor scale based on B, consisting of the pitches B, C♯, D, E, F♯, G, and A. The harmonic minor raises the A to A♯. Its key signature has two sharps. Its relative major is D major, and its parallel major is B major.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B_minor

06:02

C-sharp minor or C♯ minor is a minor scale based on C♯, with the pitches C♯, D♯, E, F♯, G♯, A, and B. Its key signature consists of four sharps. Its relative major is E major, and its parallel major is C-sharp major.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D_flat_minor

03:36

E♭ minor or E-flat minor is a minor scale based on E-flat, consisting of the pitches E♭, F, G♭, A♭, B♭, C♭, and D♭. In the harmonic minor, the D♭ is raised to D♮. Its key signature consists of six flats. Its relative major is G-flat major, and its parallel major is E-flat major. Its enharmonic equivalent is D-sharp minor.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E_flat_minor

02:49

F-sharp minor is a minor scale based on F-sharp, consisting of the pitches F♯, G♯, A, B, C♯, D, and E. For the harmonic minor, the E is raised to E♯. Its key signature has three sharps. Its relative major is A major, and its parallel major is F-sharp major.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F_sharp_minor

03:28

A-flat minor is a minor scale based on A-flat, consisting of the pitches A♭, B♭, C♭, D♭, E♭, F♭, and G♭. For the harmonic minor, the G♭ is raised to G♮. Its key signature has seven flats. Its relative major is C-flat major (or, enharmonically, B major), and its parallel major is A-flat major. Its enharmonic equivalent is G-sharp minor.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_flat_minor

02:42

B♭ minor or ♭flat minor is a minor scale based on ♭flat, consisting of the pitches B♭, C, D♭, E♭, F, G♭, and A♭. Its key signature has five flats. The harmonic minor scale would use an A♮ instead of A♭. Its relative major is D-flat major, and its parallel major is ♭flat major. Its enharmonic equivalent is A-sharp minor.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B_flat_minor

Section 5: Special Scales
02:14

The chromatic scale is a musical scale with twelve pitches, each a semitone above or below another. On a modern piano or other equal-tempered instrument, all the semitones are the same size (100 cents). In other words, the notes of an equal-tempered chromatic scale are equally spaced. An equal-tempered chromatic scale is a nondiatonic scale having no tonic because of the symmetry of its equally spaced notes.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromatic_scale

02:41

In music, a whole tone scale is a scale in which each note is separated from its neighbors by the interval of a whole step. There are only two complementary whole tone scales, both six-note or hexatonic scales.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wholetone_scale

03:44

An octatonic scale is any eight-note musical scale. Among the most famous of these is a scale in which the notes ascend in alternating intervals of a whole step and a half step, creating a symmetric scale. In classical theory, in contradistinction to jazz theory, this scale is commonly simply called the octatonic scale, although there are forty-two other non-enharmonically equivalent, non-transpositionally equivalent eight-tone sets possible. In jazz theory this scale is more particularly called the diminished scale (Campbell 2001, p. 126), or symmetric diminished scale (Hatfield 2005, p. 125), because it can be conceived as a combination of two interlocking diminished seventh chords, just as the augmented scale can be conceived as a combination of two interlocking augmented triads.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octatonic_scale

02:18

The term blues scale is used to describe a few scales with differing numbers of pitches and related characteristics. The hexatonic, or six note, blues scale consists of the minor pentatonic scale plus the ♯4th or ♭5th degree. A major feature of the blues scale is the use of blue notes, however, since blue notes are considered alternative inflections, a blues scale may be considered to not fit the traditional definition of a scale. At its most basic, a single version of this "blues scale" is commonly used over all changes (or chords) in a twelve bar blues progression. Likewise, in contemporary jazz theory, its use is commonly based upon the key rather than the individual chord.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blues_scale

Section 6: Learning Chords
08:51

A chord in music is any harmonic set of two or more notes that is heard as if sounding simultaneously. These need not actually be played together: arpeggios and broken chords may for many practical and theoretical purposes be understood as chords. Chords and sequences of chords are frequently used in modern western, west African and Oceanian music, whereas they are absent from the music of many other parts of the world.

The most frequently encountered chords are triads, so called because they consist of three distinct notes: further notes may be added to give seventh chords, extended chords, or added tone chords. The most common chords are the major and minor triads and then the augmented and diminished triads. The descriptions "major", "minor", "augmented" and "diminished" are sometimes referred to collectively as chordal "quality". Chords are also commonly classed by their root note so, for instance, the chord C Major may be described as a triad of major quality built upon the note C. Chords may also be classified by inversion, the order in which their notes are stacked.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_chord

02:29

In the harmony of Western art music a chord is said to be in root position when the tonic note is the lowest in the chord, and the other notes are above it. When the lowest note is not the tonic, the chord is said to be inverted. Chords, having many constituent notes, can have many different inverted positions. Further, a four-note chord can be inverted to four different positions by the same method as triadic inversion. Where guitar chords are concerned the term "inversion" is used slightly differently; to refer to stock fingering "shapes".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_chord#Inversion

02:21

How to practice chords.

Section 7: Major Triads
01:55

In this video you will learn the C major triads

01:35

In this video you will learn the D major triads

01:33

In this video you will learn the E major triads

01:27

In this video you will learn the F major triads

01:36

In this video you will learn the G major triads

01:30

In this video you will learn the A major triads

01:35

In this video you will learn the B major triads

01:41

In this video you will learn the Db major triads

01:37

In this video you will learn the Eb major triads

01:55

In this video you will learn the F# major triads

01:31

In this video you will learn the Ab major triads

01:29

In this video you will learn the Bb major triads

Section 8: Minor Triads
01:34

In this video you will learn the C minor triads

01:38

In this video you will learn the D minor triads

01:31

In this video you will learn the E minor triads

01:40

In this video you will learn the F minor triads

01:36

In this video you will learn the G minor triads

01:29

In this video you will learn the A minor triads

01:36

In this video you will learn the B minor triads

02:24

In this video you will learn the Db minor triads

01:58

In this video you will learn the Eb minor triads

01:34

In this video you will learn the F# minor triads

02:24

In this video you will learn the Ab minor triads

01:50

In this video you will learn the Bb minor triads

Section 9: Major Seventh Chords
02:01

In this video you will learn the C major sevenths

01:52

In this video you will learn the D major sevenths

01:57

In this video you will learn the E major sevenths

01:32

In this video you will learn the F major sevenths

01:41

In this video you will learn the G major sevenths

01:49

In this video you will learn the A major sevenths

02:03

In this video you will learn the B major sevenths

01:53

In this video you will learn the Db major sevenths

01:44

In this video you will learn the Eb major sevenths

01:57

In this video you will learn the F# major sevenths

01:57

In this video you will learn the Ab major sevenths

01:51

In this video you will learn the Bb major sevenths

Section 10: Minor Seventh Chords
01:51

In this video you will learn the C minor sevenths

01:56

In this video you will learn the D minor sevenths

01:42

In this video you will learn the E minor sevenths

01:50

In this video you will learn the F minor sevenths

01:47

In this video you will learn the G minor sevenths

01:37

In this video you will learn the A minor sevenths

02:02

In this video you will learn the B minor sevenths

02:44

In this video you will learn the Db minor sevenths

02:07

In this video you will learn the Eb minor sevenths

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Instructor Biography

Ozie Cargile, Composer/Pianist

Ozie Cargile is a composer from Detroit, Michigan. At eleven, his music teacher sparked his interest in music whereupon he taught himself to play the piano. Greatly inspired by the pieces of John Williams (Star Wars, Indiana Jones, Jurassic Park...) and other legendary composers, Cargile decided to advance his studies in composition and orchestration at the University of Michigan School of Music. Clearly following the simple yet powerful advice once given to him by the late Jerry Goldsmith (“Study.”), he earned a Bachelor of Music Composition with a principle degree in piano performance.

In 2011, his choral orchestral work Song for Humanity was premiered by the Boulder Symphony of Boulder, Colorado in collaboration with the 150-voice Boulder Chorale as a precursor to Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony. In the same year, he joined the open, collaborative production company HitRECord, founded by actor/director Joseph Gordon-Levitt. Since then, Cargile has written a notable number of records for different projects on HitRECord and frequently does collaborations with fellow “HitRECorders”. For example, Cargile scored Strawberry Bootlaces, which premiered at Sundance 2012, and a number of animated shorts for the Emmy Award winning HitRECord on TV, which airs on Pivot Cable Television.

Renowned Orchestras such as the Detroit Symphony Orchestra and the Orchestra of St. Luke’s in New York have performed several of his other works. He also serves as the composer-in-residence for the Tribute to Black Pioneers in Music Performance, an operatic concert series produced by Fredrick Peterbark in collaboration with universities and symphonies across the country.

Throughout the years, Cargile has studied with several distinguished composers including Michael Daugherty, Erik Santos, Susan Botti and Bright Sheng. Recently, he successfully completed the “Hollywood Music Workshop” in Austria, where he took classes in orchestration and arranging with Conrad Pope and Nan Schwartz.

Cargile sees it as a musician’s duty to raise consciousness about important issues concerning humanity and is convinced that this can only be done through strategic promotion and social networking. While partaking in various different projects, he constantly works on improving himself, on getting more knowledgeable and on meeting new people.

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