Proven Techniques to Control an Unruly Classroom
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Proven Techniques to Control an Unruly Classroom

Bring Order to Chaos in your classroom and Regain Control of Unruly Students
0.0 (0 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
0 students enrolled
Created by Bob Brandis
Last updated 8/2017
English
Curiosity Sale
Current price: $10 Original price: $25 Discount: 60% off
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Includes:
  • 1.5 hours on-demand video
  • 3 Articles
  • 2 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Teachers will learn a range of strategies to control unruly students
  • Classroom teachers will find proactive techniques to control an unruly class before they become unruly.
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • You need to be a classroom teacher, either full time, contract, casual, relief or substitute teacher to value from this course.
  • This course asks that you be introspective so you can look at classroom practices that may not be producing the results you would like.
Description

Course Description

When chaos ruins your day, you need techniques and strategies to regain control. This course will provide you with tried, tested and proven techniques to control unruly students in your classroom. This is a course for the practitioner - the teacher in the classroom - at the chalkface. 

Minimum theory - just proven techniques that will floor the unruly students in your classroom and put learning back onto your classroom agenda.

Master the skills that make student behaviour work in your favour.

This course includes

  • over 2 hours of quality videos
  • 20 Lectures
  • Solutions to Common and not so common classroom behaviour scenarios;
  • A solution centre for you to list your problem and have it solved.

Managing Student Behaviour separates good teachers from GREAT teachers. Great teachers make student behaviour look easy. Learn what makes them different. The strategies you master in this course will put you in the league of a GREAT teacher.

At the end of this course you will

  • understand the classroom dynamics of the UNRULY CLASS
  • recognise teaching strategies that make a difference to student behaviour;
  • Proven Techniques to Control an Unruly Classroom
  • master a wide repertoire of strategies to apply to any student behaviour encountered.
  • become a better teacher.

You will be provided with

  • supplementary ebooks on how to better manage an unruly class.
  • a variety of templates to use when interacting with students;
  • videos on strategies you can apply in your classroom.
Who is the target audience?
  • Classroom teachers both primary and secondary who would like help managing student behaviour.
  • If you have ever encountered am unruly class, this is the course for you.
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Curriculum For This Course
15 Lectures
01:33:28
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Introduction
3 Lectures 16:56

Unruly Students can be catastrophic in your classroom. This course will give you a wide range of proven strategies, hints, tips and ideas. After this course you will be better equipped to control unruly students so you do not end up in front of an unruly class.

Preview 03:14

In the school context, should the term “unruly” be used to describes the behaviour or a student or both. It is a big issue for some educators.

I know we are told to talk about the behaviour rather than the student. But that the fact of the matter is sometimes, the student chooses to be unruly.

Is criminal can be used to describe the activity and the person, why can't we call a student unruly. Parents hate it and experts hate it, but is it appropriate?

Preview 08:43

Of course a class can not be unruly. Or can it?

There are unruly classes out there, aren't there?

Sometimes it certainly feels like it.

Is an unruly class the greatest myth in our education system or is it fact?

The Unruly Class
04:59
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How to Control The Unruly Class
12 Lectures 01:15:35

In most schools, the bell will ring and the students will meander up to their classroom from their morning foray in the playground. 

Students will dawdle into their seats in waves, usually in the very groups they formed that morning. They will chatter about the activity in which they were involved a few minutes ago while you attempt to gain their attention.

You can jump in right there and put a stop to unruliness.

Or can you?

How to Enter the Room with an Unruly Class
06:35

So you have taken on the role of the Classroom Gatekeeper.

The unruly students at this point, will start to feel uneasy, because the classroom was their domain before.

You have taken away their locus of control.

Now you need to Create your presence.

You are about to build a culture of compliance for all students.

This module looks at how to build a culture of compliance in your classroom.

Preview 08:14

This is the greatest hoax in out educational system. The soft start to the day can do so much irreparable damage that you could be setting yourself up for failure. My opinion differs to some of the experts.

What do you think? 

The "Meet and Greet" for the Unruly Class
02:11

The behaviour of unruly students may not be your fault, but as a teacher, you must act. But how should you act?

There is no doubt that unruly student behaviour gets a reaction.
 
It drives up our blood pressure and causes us no end of grief in the classroom. 

Teachers often play into the hands of unruly students by making misbehaviour into a badge of honour.

Don't create a badge of honour which support unruly behaviour.

Don't Start A Badge of Honour for Unruly Students
05:31

What Makes an Unruly Students and How to Manage Unruly Students in Your Classroom.

The unruly student really is an absolute pain.

They seem to surface for most teachers - unfortunately.

Your role, as a teacher, is to ensure the unruly student does not interfere with the right of other students to learn.

That can be an exhausting and a full time job in itself.

This module looks at strategies that work.

Classroom Strategies that Work with Unruly Students
06:21

The Antiseptic Bounce is a preventative behaviour management measure that can be applied to unruly students before they become unruly.

It is not a new strategy. In fact it has been around for a long time. It is much more than a simple time out.

If used correctly, it is a great behaviour management tool to have in your repertoire. 

However, there are several traps that will cause this strategy to fail. 

This module will show you have to use the antiseptic bounce effectively as a protocol in your managing student behaviour regime.

How to Use the Antiseptic Bounce to Halt Unruly Students in their Tracks
08:37

Being liked by your students is an positive expectation, but it puts you, as a teacher, at a distinct disadvantage. Being liked is over-rated. Not being hated has a more productive impact on your classroom experience,

Being liked is Over-Rated. Find out How Not to Be Hated By Unruly Students
04:11

Abraham Kaplan's first coined the expression "If All You Have is a Hammer" in 1964. He called it, “The law of the instrument." 

Abraham Maslow's in his book The Psychology of Science, published in 1966 also referred to the "Law of the Hammer."

So, the phrase has been attributed both to Maslow and to Kaplan. It doesn't matter who used it first.

This analogy gives it meaning. 

Give a small boy a hammer, and he will find that everything he encounters needs pounding.

The course and the subsequent resource, is about behaviour management in the unruly classroom.

For too long, teachers have suffered from The Law of the Hammer. Behaviour management in the old days involved the use of the cane (or the rod or the strap) and little else. Thank goodness, we have come further than that.

Or have we?

If All You Have is a Hammer...
03:38

This is a great strategy to beat the unruly student at his/her own game.

Distracting the Distractable. Using fire to fight fire.
03:42

Motivational Questioning is a comprehensive strategy that draws unruly students into accepting responsibility for their actions. 

The two powerful question challenge the unruly student to substantiate the effort applied to tasks. 

This technique draws the student away from apportioning blame  and moves them towards choosing the responsibility to become involved in the learning task.

Learn how to use motivational questioning in challenging the unruly students into your classroom.

Motivational Questioning as Tool to Manage Unruly Students
06:41

Do students take advantage of perceived weakness? It is not clear but a teacher without authority seldom has complete control of an unruly class. Or does the class become unruly because the teacher does not have control.

This module outline 8 clear behaviour management strategies to bring the unruly student back to the task.

They Smell Fear Don't They? 8 Strategies to Bring the Unruly Back to Learning.
11:48

How to Solve the "ATTITUDE" Unruly Students Give You.
08:05
About the Instructor
Bob Brandis
4.9 Average rating
7 Reviews
28 Students
3 Courses
Principal, Teacher, Behaviour Management Mentor

I have been a professional educator for over 40 year, the last 35 years as a principal. I have taught every class from preschool to senior high school and I have run schools from primary to high school, large and small, country and city settings. I have managed student behaviour in every possible setting. I have led behaviour management initiatives in many schools and districts. I have mentored hundreds of young and experienced teachers in managing the behaviour of students in the classes.