PMI-ACP Exam Prep - PMI REP 21 PDUs
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PMI-ACP Exam Prep - PMI REP 21 PDUs

Everything you must know to earn the PMI-Agile Certified Practitioner (PMI-ACP) designation from a PMI REP for 21 PDUs
4.5 (400 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
1,965 students enrolled
Created by Joseph Phillips
Last updated 11/2016
English
Current price: $10 Original price: $200 Discount: 95% off
1 day left at this price!
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Includes:
  • 11 hours on-demand video
  • 20 Articles
  • 13 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Qualify for the PMI-ACP Certification Exam
  • Build an Agile Mindset
  • Identify characteristics of value-driven projects
  • Claim 21 Professional Development Units (PDUs)
  • Identify the characteristics of a successful agile project
  • Discuss agile project management in depth
  • Pass the PMI-ACP examination
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • What agile project management is and is not
  • Qualifications for the PMI-ACP examination
Description

Looking for a PMI-ACP exam prep course with 21 PDUs? This is it!

We are a PMI Registered Education Provider:

  • Instructingcom, LLC #4082
  • PMI-ACP Exam Prep; Activity ID PMIACP416
  • 21 PDU hours

Not all trainers on Udemy are part of the PMI REP program - we are! We have passed a quality audit, a business review, and we completely abide by the PMI REP program.

You want to earn the PMI-ACP certification and you need quality training without all the nonsense and fluff so many courses offer. You do want to learn from an authority in project management that’s also certified as a PMI-ACP and is a PMI Registered Education Provider.

This is the course you want. This course provides 21 hours of Agile project management education and is taught by project management author and expert Joseph Phillips. You can claim these 21 hours as 21 PDUs for your continuing PMI education.

Our PMI-ACP® Exam Prep course provides complete coverage of the PMI-ACP® exam objectives for the PMBOK Guide, Fifth Edition and the library of Agile resources PMI recommends. Start today, invest in your career, and begin working to clear your PMI-ACP® exam. Here's what's included in our PMP® Exam Prep Online Seminar:

►21 Professional Development Units (PDUs) from a PMI REP

►Includes PMI updates from July 2015 RDS

►Complete coverage of the entire PMI-ACP® exam objectives

►21 contact hours of project management education

►Practice exam questions and answers on all exam objectives

►Module exams covering every PMI-ACP exam objective

►PDF course workbook; entire course for note-taking and following along

►Videos of all concepts, formulas, theories, and agile project management practices

►Lectures on the entire PMI-Agile® exam objectives

►24 x 7 Web and mobile access

►Flashcards of the PMI-ACP terms you must know for exam success

►All exams are distributed in PDF format for easy printing and studying on-the-go

►Course discussions with the Instructor and peers

►30-day satisfaction guaranteed

Who is the target audience?
  • Project managers who qualify for the PMI-ACP examination
  • Project manager seeking more information about agile project manager
Students Who Viewed This Course Also Viewed
Curriculum For This Course
Expand All 92 Lectures Collapse All 92 Lectures 12:52:17
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PMI-ACP: Preparing to Pass the Exam
15 Lectures 02:11:08

This lecture is an overview of the entire course and what you can expect as you work through the material. In this lecture I'll discuss the lectures, resources, quizzes, games, and certificate of completion. 

In this course we'll cover all of the PMI-ACP exam domains:

  • Agile principles and mindset
  • Value-driven delivery
  • Stakeholder engagement
  • Team performance
  • Adaptive planning
  • Problems, issues, detection and resolution
  • Continuous improvement


Preview 02:43

Have you taken a PMI exam before, such as the CAPM or the PMP? The PMI-ACP exam is very similar in its format and structure. Of course the content is different, but the mechanics of the test is similar.

In this lecture we’ll discuss all the basic questions about the exam and the testing center. We’ll cover:

  • Exam prerequisites
  • Exam fees
  • The PMI-ACP application process
  • What to do if you get audited
  • Exam blueprint – what you need to study
  • Prometric Testing Center processes and experience
  • Finishing the exam and your score report
Preview 09:12

This lecture details the contents and mechanics of the PMI-ACP exam. In this lecture I'll discuss:

  • PMI-ACP exam scoring
  • PMI-ACP exam blueprint
  • Testing center details
  • Scheduling and rescheduling the test

And everything else you must know before applying and scheduling to pass the PMI-ACP examination.

All About the PMI-ACP Exam Contents
12:33

This course follows a logical, no-frills approach to passing the PMI-ACP examination. In this lecture we’ll discuss the goals of the course and what you can expect:

  • First goal of the course is you passing the exam
  • Second goal, is build a deep understanding of agile methodologies
  • This is not a course on:
    • How to apply agile project management
    • How to be a good project manager
    • Me helping you do your job

This lecture will review the overall structure of the course, the resources provided to you in the course, and how to claim your certificate of completion.

How this course is structured
13:44

You want to earn your PMI-ACP designation. This first lecture of the course covers everything that you must have to qualify for the exam. That’s right, now everyone can just sign up and take the examination – there are qualifiers.

Here are the basics we’ll discuss in this lecture:

There are some prerequisites for the PMI-ACP:

  • 2,000 hours of general project experience working on teams. A current PMP® or PgMP® will satisfy this requirement but is not required to apply for the PMI-ACP.
  • 1,500 hours working on agile project teams or with agile methodologies. This requirement is in addition to the 2,000 hours of general project experience.
  • 21 contact hours of training in agile practices

In this lecture we'll also examine the first PMI-ACP exam objective in detail: Agile Practices and Mindset.

Agile Mindeset: PMI-ACP Exam Domain Details
13:44

Now we’re moving a little deeper into the examination details. In this lecture I’ll walk you through all of the exam domains and tasks that you’ll be tested on. This lecture is the key to the entire course – as it covers exactly what you’ll be tested on, so pay close attention to this lecture.

In this lecture we’re going to talk about the exam blueprint and what you must know. You can also use this blueprint to plan your study strategy accordingly. In this lecture we’ll cover these topics for your PMI-ACP exam:

  • Domain I. Agile Principles and Mindset - 16%
  • Domain II. Value-driven Delivery - 20%
  • Domain III. Stakeholder Engagement - 17%
  • Domain IV. Team Performance - 16%
  • Domain V. Adaptive Planning - 12%
  • Domain VI. Problem Detection and Resolution - 10%
  • Domain VII. Continuous Improvement - 9%
Value-Driven Delivery: PMI-ACP Exam Domain Details
17:28

Stakeholder engagement is worth 17 percent of your PMI-ACP exam score.

Stakeholders are the people and groups that have a vested interest in the outcome of your project. They are interested in the project’s success, or, in some cases, the project’s demise.

In agile project management, you’ll need to keep stakeholders engaged through communication, participation, and value delivery.

Stakeholder Engagement: PMI-ACP Exam Domain Details
11:49

Team performance is worth 16 percent of the PMI-ACP exam score.

In agile project management the project team is a resource and is not considered a cost. That’s a big difference from the more predictive approach of project management where the cost of the labor is always seen as a burden to the project’s success.

In agile project management the opposite is true because agile projects are almost always knowledge-driven project. In knowledge-driven projects, such as software development, the team competency is the primary resource, not brawn or brute force.

Team Performance: PMI-ACP Exam Domain Details
09:06

Adaptive planning is worth 12 percent of the PMI-ACP exam score.

In a predictive project, such as construction, the entire project plan is defined before the labor actually begins. In an agile project, there are iterations of planning and many uncertainties at the launch of the project. This exam domain will test your agile planning skills, specifically on these five concepts:

  • Agile projects are value-driven
  • Minimize non-value-added work
  • Plan to replan
  • Early plans are necessary, but they’re likely flawed
  • Uncertainty requires replanning


Adaptive Planning: PMI-ACP Exam Domain Details
10:06

Problem Detection and Resolution is worth just 10 percent of your passing score, but this is an important topic. In this lecture we’ll discuss the types of problems that can affect an agile project. We’ll look at several things and how you might go about finding a resolution in your agile project.

For your exam you’ll need to be familiar with these topics:

  • Creating a safe environment for the project team
  • Creating success strategies
  • Financial impact of project problems
  • Issues and risks
  • Reviewing technical debt and agile projects
  • Success modes and failure modes
  • The timeline of where issues are discovered
Problem Detection and Resolution: PMI-ACP Exam Domain Details
05:20

Continuous Improvement is worth nine percent of the PMI-ACP exam score.

While this domain is the smallest of all the exam domains don’t skip these topics. This isn’t a particularly difficult domain to grasp, so that’s approximately ten exam questions in your favor. The three primary tasks you’ll be tested on are:

  • Tailor and adapt the project process by periodically reviewing and integrating team practices, organizational culture, and delivery goals in order to ensure team effectiveness within established organizational guidelines and norms.
  • Improve team processes by conducting frequent retrospectives and improvement experiments in order to continually enhance the effectiveness of the team, project, and organization.
  • Seek feedback on the product by incremental delivery and frequent demonstrations in order to improve the value of the product.
Continuous Improvement: PMI-ACP Exam Domain Details
08:12

In this lecture I'll walk you through all of the PMI references and resources to help you prepare to pass the PMI-ACP examination. In this lecture we'll look at:

  • Official PMI-ACP exam objectives
  • PMI-ACP Handbook
  • PMI exam guidance
  • PMI-ACP reference list

These resources are useful to understand exactly what PMI will test you. You'll want to read and refer to these resources often as you prepare to pass the PMI-ACP exam.

PMI Resources for the PMI-ACP Exam
08:04

Ready for a quiz? The quiz for this chapter is in the Lecture Resources. It’s a PDF document that you can download and complete. This is an easy quiz! It’s meant to refresh you on what you’ve just learned and to underscore the important topics from the lecture.

Will these questions be just like the actual PMI-ACP examination? No. I’ve written these to be similar, but there’s no telling what PMI may do on the actual exam.

PMI-ACP Sample Quiz: Testing Process
05:34

Great job finishing this first section of the PMI-ACP Exam Prep course. You’ve done something already that many people only talk about: actually investing some time and effort into earning a PMI certification. Yes, this is only the first section, but it’s a start and that’s more than most people even attempt.

But you’re not done yet! You need to keep going, build momentum and complete this course.

In this lecture we’ll take a quick look back at what we discussed in this course. This is a new recap of what’s been covered and the most important topics from this first section.

Preview 03:26

This is fun little game to test what you've learned in this section. Click the link to launch this interactive learning game.

PMI-ACP Exam Details Learning Game
00:07
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Agile Principles and Mindset
14 Lectures 02:17:17

This section is about building a good foundation of agile principles and approaches. In this section I'll discuss:

  • Welcome and expect change
  • Create small value-added increments 
  • Utilize feedback loops 
  • Constantly learn through discovery and creativity 
  • Focus on developing a value for stakeholders 
  • Why it’s okay to fail fast 
  • Deliver value throughout the project 
  • Constantly improve upon the project and the project work 
Agile Principles and Mindset Section Overview
02:47

In this lecture I’ll provide you with a quick overview of the PMI-ACP Domain: Agile Principles and Mindset. This lecture sets the stage for all the other lectures in this section. In this lecture we’ll quickly discuss what is the Agile Mindset and how it affects your ability to earn the PMI-ACP certification.

We’ll also discuss the Agile Principles and how you must embrace these for exam success, but also for your success as an agile project manager.

PMI-ACP Domain Overview: Agile Principles and Mindset
09:47

What does it mean to have an Agile mindset? It means to think Agile, understand the change is welcome, and for many project managers, it’s a shift from the predictive approach project management utilizes in many fields.

The agile project manager has several attributes that we’ll discuss in this lecture:

  • Advocate for agile principles and values in the organization
  • Ensure common understanding of agile principles
  • Educate and influence agile
  • Transparency equates to trust
  • Safe environment for experimenting
Introducing the Agile Principles and Mindset
15:21

The PMI-ACP examination will test the concepts and approaches in the Agile Manifesto. You don’t need to memorize this document, but you should be very familiar with the philosophies of what the manifesto recommends.

The Agile Manifesto is a proclamation of four key values and 12 guiding principles for managing software development projects. It’s a foundation for all that is Agile. In this lecture we’ll walk through the entire Agile Manifesto and see what you must know about this document to pass the PMI-ACP examination.

Walking through the Agile Manifesto
09:53

Can you really create an Agile mindset? What if you come from a traditional predictive project management environment? Yes, but there may be some challenges. The approach to take is to first be open to the possibilities that there’s more than one way to manage a project.

Second, knowledge work projects, like software development, are more conducive to agile project management than more end-driven projects like construction.

In this lecture we’ll discuss the challenges you may have when first embracing agile project management – and what you’ll need to do for this exam objective. Let’s go!

Building Your Agile Mindset: 12 Principles of Agile
12:39

On the PMI-ACP examination you’ll have lots of questions on the Agile approaches to project management. Fortunately, the biggest methodology is also based on the Agile Manifesto, to some extent, and its components are not difficult to learn.

In this lecture I’ll discuss Scrum in agile project management. Specifically, we’ll look at:

  • Scrum is easy to understand, but can be difficult to master
  • Scrum is a rugby term
  • Scrum uses a methodology called the scrum framework
  • The scrum framework is a set of practices, roles and responsibilities, events, artifacts, and rules
Exploring the Agile Methodology of Scrum
19:55

Another flavor of agile project management is eXtreme Programming, also known as XP. XP has some similarities to Scrum, but there are a few different terms and approaches to how XP works. In this lecture we discuss how XP works and what you’ll need to know for the PMI-ACP examination.

We will discuss several topics, including:

  • XP core values
  • XP project team roles
  • XP practices
  • Refactoring code in an XP environment
XP
17:20

For your PMI-ACP examination you’ll also need to know about Lean and how its characteristics have been incorporated into knowledge work projects like software development. You will have a few questions on lean, but primarily on its core principles.

In this lecture we will discuss:

  • Lean core concepts
  • Seven wastes of lean
  • The principles of Kanban
  • Little’s Law
Lean in Software Development
19:46

There are a few other “flavors” of agile project management that you’ll need to be familiar with for your PMI-ACP examination. Don’t worry – these are easy and you want have tons of questions on these lesser-known agile project management practices.

In this lecture I’ll discuss:

  • Feature-driven development
  • Dynamic Systems Development Method
  • Crystal

That’s right – just three little topics that you may see on your exam. Not tough at all – you can do this!

Other Agile Approaches
07:06

So what does agile project management look like when it’s actually being implemented? In this lecture we’ll examine just that: the mechanics managing a project with agile. Specifically we’ll address several things you’ll need to know for your PMI-ACP examination:

  • Product vision
  • Creating the product roadmap
  • Release planning
  • Iteration planning
  • Daily scrums
  • Sprint reviews
  • Sprint retrospectives

There are lots of terms in this lecture, so pay close attention. You may want to watch this lecture more than once (hint!)

Putting the Agile Process in Action
06:16

One of the biggest themes on the PMI-ACP examination is that you, the project manager, take a servant leadership role. This can be a big adjustment if you’ve worked in environments where you’ve taken more of a command-and-control approach. In agile, the focus is on the team while the agile project manager supports the team.

In this lecture I’ll discuss how:

  • The recognition is on the team members not the project manager or coach or ScrumMaster
  • The team gets the work done
  • The team adds value
  • Servant leaders provide what team members need 
Leadership in Agile Projects
12:32

Great job finishing up this section on the Agile Principles and Mindset. In this lecture we’ll take a quick look back at what you’ve learned in this section and I’ll highlight some of the most important topics.

This review lecture is always a good thing to review as you move through the course so you don’t lose touch with these topics. 

Section wrap: Agile Principles and Mindset
03:18

Ready for a quiz? The quiz for this chapter is in the Lecture Resources. It’s a PDF document that you can download and complete. This is an easy quiz! It’s meant to refresh you on what you’ve just learned and to underscore the important topics from the lecture.

Will these questions be just like the actual PMI-ACP examination? No. I’ve written these to be similar, but there’s no telling what PMI may do on the actual exam.

Here's the quiz online:

Agile Mindset Quiz

1. What attribute of agile equates to trust with the project team and other stakeholders?

A. Inspection.

B. Adaption.

C. Transparency.

D. Honesty.


2. What type of processes are best described as incremental, interactive, and adaptive?

A. Empirical.

B. Defined.

C. Project management.

D. Agile.


3. Beth has just started a new job with the ABX Company. She has years of experience working on agile projects as ScrumMaster. The ABX company currently doesn’t use agile approaches, but they may like to eventually. In this scenario, Beth is likely to feel which one of the following?

A. Excited.

B. Sad.

C. Scared.

D. Frustrated.


4. Which one of the following statements best describes being agile?

A. Forcing agile practice.

B. Choosing correct practices.

C. Command and control.

D. Understanding agile.


5. As a PMI-ACP candidate you must be familiar with the Agile Manifesto. What does the Agile Manifesto value over processes and tools?

A. Individuals and interactions.

B. Working software.

C. Customer collaboration.

D. Responding to change.


6. What’s the best way to satisfy customers in an Agile project?

A. Communication on a regular basis throughout the project.

B. Involving the customers as part of the project team.

C. Early and continuous delivery of valuable software.

D. Deliver on time and on budget.


7. There are five scrum ceremonies. Which of the following is not a scrum ceremony?

A. Project backlog refinement.

B. Sprint planning meetings.

C. Daily scrum.

D. Sprint reviews.


8. Which core value of XP is demonstrated through pair programming?

A. Feedback.

B. Courage.

C. Simplicity.

D. Respect.


9. Who creates the product vision in an agile project?

A. ScrumMaster.

B. Product owner.

C. Development team.

D. Customer.


10. Servant leadership is a big part of Agile practices. In order to be an effective servant leader you must do all of the following except for which one?

A. Carry food and water.

B. Remove impediments.

C. Provide what team members need.

D. Clean up the project war room.


Answer Key

1. What attribute of agile equates to trust with the project team and other stakeholders?

A. Inspection.

B. Adaption.

C. Transparency.

D. Honesty.

C. Transparency equates to trust is an agile principle core to the agile mindset. Choices A, B, and are incorrect choices for this question.


2. What type of processes are best described as incremental, interactive, and adaptive?

A. Empirical.

B. Defined.

C. Project management.

D. Agile.

A. Empirical processes are interactive, incremental, change often, adapt, and pass through the reviews; they are change-driven. Choices B, C, and D are incorrect choices for this question.


3. Beth has just started a new job with the ABX Company. She has years of experience working on agile projects as ScrumMaster. The ABX company currently doesn’t use agile approaches, but they may like to eventually. In this scenario, Beth is likely to feel which one of the following?

A. Excited.

B. Sad.

C. Scared.

D. Frustrated.

D. An individual with an agile mindset will feel frustrated if the remainder of the organization doesn’t embrace agile. A, B, and C are incorrect choices for this question.


4. Which one of the following statements best describes being agile?

A. Forcing agile practice.

B. Choosing correct practices.

C. Command and control.

D. Understanding agile.

B. Choosing correct practices is an example of being agile. A, C, and D are incorrect choices for this question. Note that you can understand agile without being agile.


5. As a PMI-ACP candidate you must be familiar with the Agile Manifesto. What does the Agile Manifesto value over processes and tools?

A. Individuals and interactions.

B. Working software.

C. Customer collaboration.

D. Responding to change.

A. The Agile Manifesto values individuals and interactions over processes and tools. For your PMI-ACP exam be quite familiar with the Agile Manifesto. Choices B, C, and D, are incorrect choices for this question.


6. What’s the best way to satisfy customers in an Agile project?

A. Communication on a regular basis throughout the project.

B. Involving the customers as part of the project team.

C. Early and continuous delivery of valuable software.

D. Deliver on time and on budget.

C. This is based on the first principle behind the Agile Manifesto: Our highest priority is to satisfy the customers through early and continuous delivery of valuable software. A, B, and D are incorrect choices for this question.


7. There are five scrum ceremonies. Which one of the following is not a scrum ceremony?

A. Project backlog refinement.

B. Sprint planning meetings.

C. Daily scrum.

D. Sprint reviews.

A. There is no project backlog refinement; rather there is product backlog refinement. The five scrum ceremonies are: Product backlog refinement, Sprint planning meetings, Daily scrum, Sprint reviews, Sprint retrospective.


8. Which core value of XP is demonstrated through pair programming?

A. Feedback.

B. Courage.

C. Simplicity.

D. Respect.

B. Of all the choices, courage is the best answer. Team members can see one another’s code as it is being written and that takes courage. Choices A, C, and D are incorrect choices for this question.


9. Who creates the product vision in an agile project?

A. ScrumMaster.

B. Product owner.

C. Development team.

D. Customer.

B. The best answer is that the product owner creates the product vision. A, C, and D are incorrect choices for this question.


10. Servant leadership is a big part of Agile practices. In order to be an effective servant leader you must do all of the following except for which one?

A. Carry food and water.

B. Remove impediments.

C. Provide what team members need.

D. Clean up the project war room.

D. Of all the choices, cleaning up after the project team isn’t the best option for a servant leader’s time and contribution. Choices A, B, and C are incorrect choices for this question.


Updated May 27, 2016


Chapter Quiz
00:31

This is fun little game to test what you've learned in this section. Click the link to launch this interactive learning game.

Preview 00:06
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PMI-ACP Exam Domain: Value Driven Delivery
10 Lectures 01:34:18

Value-driven delivery is the largest of the PMI-ACP Exam objectives:

  • 20 percent of the exam
  • Roughly 24 exam questions

Know this topic for exam and agile success. The project manager’s goal is to increase value and reduce risk as early as possible 


Preview 03:35

Value-driven delivery is a theme of the agile project management approach. In this overview video I’ll introduce this topic and help you onto the value freeway. If you want to embrace an overall strategy for passing the PMI-ACP examination, value-driven delivery is key.

This is a big, big component of the exam, so you’ll want to pay close attention to these topics. Let’s hop in and get going on redeeming and creating value for your stakeholders in this section.

PMI-ACP Domain Overview: Value Driven Delivery
04:16

Assessing value is part of the agile project management approach. In this lecture we’ll discuss what value – and anti-value – is to the project manager. We’ll look at some formulas for understanding value from both the agile project manager’s perspective and the stakeholders’ perspective.

In this lecture we’ll also review the earned value management formulas. Don’t worry – you’ll likely not have many of these formulas on the PMI-ACP examination.

Value Determination in Agile Projects
20:08

Prioritizing Value is paramount for agile projects. Think about a construction project, until the project is completely done you don’t realize any value. In knowledge-work projects, such as software development, you can have intermittent releases that provide some value to the customers while continuing to work on less-valuable components.

In this lecture we’ll explore the concept of value-driven delivery and why it’s so important for agile project management and the PMI-ACP examination.

Value Prioritization in Agile
10:20

Incremental delivery is all about delivery value as early as possible. As we’ve already discussed, you’ll prioritize the requirements with the product owner, and then work to deliver those high priority items first.

In this lecture we’ll continue that conversation on these topics:

  • The team regularly deploys working increments
  • Usually to a test environment for evaluation
  • This is an opportunity for an early return on investment 
Managing an Agile Project through Incremental Delivery
19:18

Contracting can be difficult in agile project management. You’ll deal with sellers who want to balance time, cost, and the scope the contracted work. But you also have to deal with uncertainties of change and a developing project scope in agile project management.

In this lecture we’ll discuss the challenges of contracts in agile project management and how you, the agile project manager can overcome these challenges.

Contracting in Agile Projects
10:01

In this last lecture we’ll discuss the three V’s of agile project management: value, verification, and validation.

  • Value is what someone believes a thing, such as components of your project are worth.
  • Verification is confirmation proof that the deliverables are good and will be acceptable to the project customer.
  • Validation is the acceptance and proof of the thing being done
Value: Verification and Validation
16:06

You did it! Great job finishing up this section on delivery value in agile projects. In this lecture we’ll take a quick look back at what you’ve learned in this section and I’ll highlight some of the most important topics.

This review lecture is always a good thing to review as you move through the course so you don’t lose touch with these topics. 

Section wrap: Value-Driven Delivery
03:27

Ready for a quiz? The quiz for this chapter is in the Lecture Resources. It’s a PDF document that you can download and complete. This is an easy quiz! It’s meant to refresh you on what you’ve just learned and to underscore the important topics from the lecture.

Will these questions be just like the actual PMI-ACP examination? No. I’ve written these to be similar, but there’s no telling what PMI may do on the actual exam.

Chapter Quiz
07:00

This is fun little game to test what you've learned in this section. Click the link to launch this interactive learning game.

Value-Driven Delivery Learning Game
00:06
+
PMI-ACP Exam Domain: Stakeholder Engagement
11 Lectures 01:24:23

Stakeholder engagement happens throughout the project. 

Engage current and future interested parties by building a trusting environment that aligns their needs and expectations and balances their requests with an understanding of the cost/effort involved. Promote participation and collaboration throughout the project life cycle and provide the tools for effective and informed decision making. 

Preview 03:23

Stakeholder management on the PMI-ACP examination accounts for 17 percent of the exam. That’s roughly 20 exam questions! Know stakeholder management, an easier topic for experienced project managers, and you’ll be on your way to exam success.

In this lecture I’ll discuss:

  • Working with the project stakeholders
  • Establishing a shared vision
  • Creating collaboration
  • Communicating with project stakeholders
  • Using interpersonal skills 
PMI-ACP Domain Overview: Stakeholder Engagement
07:44

This lecture is based on the PMBOK Guide and its traditional approach to stakeholder identification.

Stakeholder identification should happen as early as possible in the project. If you wait too long to properly identify the stakeholders, you may end up missing decisions and requirements that will only cause the project to stall, you could possibly create bad relationships with the stakeholders, and perhaps cause turmoil within the project. Stakeholder identification is a project initiating activity and requires the project manager, the project team, and other stakeholders to help identify who should be involved in the project. As you identify stakeholders, you’ll classify them according to their power, influence, interests, and other characteristics so as to help you better manage the project and control stakeholder engagement. Stakeholder identification should happen as early as possible in the project. This lecture will help you determine how to best to:

  • Performing stakeholder analysis
  • Relying on expert judgment
  • Creating the stakeholder register
Identifying Project Stakeholders
05:14

This lecture is based on the PMBOK Guide and its approach to managing stakeholder engagement.

As a project manager, you’ll constantly work to engage the project stakeholders. This means communication, fostering relationships, facilitating meetings, negotiating, settling disputes, and managing all of the questions, demands, and inputs from the project stakeholders. Managing stakeholder engagement is a constant, ongoing activity—it’s what’s expected of you as the project manager. You’ll have to be available to the project stakeholders, but it also means you must go seek out stakeholders when conditions and situations call for you to get stakeholders more (or less) involved in the project.

You want to keep stakeholders involved and excited about the project. That's what this lecture is all about:

  • Communicating with project stakeholders
  • Relying on interpersonal skills
  • Utilizing management skills for engagement
  • Updating the project documents
Managing stakeholder engagement
02:33

As an agile project manager you need to have a shared vision of the project with your stakeholders. This means that you and your customers, project team, product owner, and even vendors all understand the goals and priorities of the project.

In this lecture I’ll discuss creating and maintaining the shared project vision. We’ll also look at:

  • Defining what done means in agile project management
  • Working with agile modeling
  • Use case diagrams
  • Screen diagrams
  • Wireframes
  • User personas
Working with Stakeholders to Create the Shared Vision
12:30

Now that the project’s communications management plan has been created, it’s time to execute it. Managing project communications is the process of ensuring that the proper stakeholders get the appropriate information when and how they need it. Essentially, it’s the implementation of the communications management plan. This plan details how the information is to be created and dispersed, and also how the dispersed information is archived. Managing project communications ensures that the right people, get the right message, at the right time, in the right modality.

  • Examining communication skills
  • Creating an Information Gathering and Retrieval System
  • Dispersing project information
  • Documenting the project’s Lessons Learned
  • Updating the organizational process assets
Managing Project Communications
15:23

Collaboration is another key topic in agile project management. Right from the Agile Manifesto we saw the idea of collaboration: Customer collaboration over contract negotiation Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project.

In this lecture I’ll discuss the benefits of collaboration:

  • Generates wiser decisions
  • Promotes problem solving
  • Promotes action
  • Build social capital
  • Ownership of collective problems 
Reviewing Collaborative Approaches in Agiles
14:30

A big part of stakeholder management is your interpersonal skills in agile project management. This means you have to have emotional intelligence and listening skills. This ties back to our conversation about communications management and the importance of communicating with, not to, the project stakeholders.

In this lecture we’ll discuss:

  • Four quadrants of emotional intelligence
  • Active listening
  • Internal listening
  • Focused listening
  • Global listening

We’ll also discuss conflict resolution, decision-making, and shared collaboration.

Interpersonal Skills for Agile Success
11:52

You’re making great progress in this course!

You’ve finished section on stakeholder management in agile projects. In this lecture we’ll take a quick look back at what you’ve learned in this section and I’ll highlight some of the most important topics.

This review lecture is always a good thing to review as you move through the course so you don’t lose touch with these topics. 

Stakeholder Engagement Section Wrap
04:39

Ready for a quiz? The quiz for this chapter is in the Lecture Resources. It’s a PDF document that you can download and complete. This is an easy quiz! It’s meant to refresh you on what you’ve just learned and to underscore the important topics from the lecture.

Will these questions be just like the actual PMI-ACP examination? No. I’ve written these to be similar, but there’s no telling what PMI may do on the actual exam.

Chapter Quiz
06:28

This is fun little game to test what you've learned in this section. Click the link to launch this interactive learning game.

Stakeholder Engagement Learning Game
00:07
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PMI-ACP Exam Domain: Team Performance
9 Lectures 59:02

This section focuses on the role of the project team. Create an environment of trust, learning, collaboration, and conflict resolution that promotes team self-organization, enhances relationships among team members, and cultivates a culture of high performance. 

This PMI-ACP exam domain will test you on:

  • 9 tasks
  • 3 subdomains
  • 16 percent of exam; 19 questions


Preview 03:37

As the agile project manager you need a servant leader approach to the project team. This doesn’t mean, however, that the team runs over you in the project. This section deals with promoting team performance and your role as the servant leader.

For your exam, you’ll need to know about team performance and what steps you can take to promote team performance. Let’s dig into this section on team performance in agile project management.

Preview 05:01

Management is about getting things done. Leadership is about aligning, motivating, directing, and inspiring people. Adaptive leadership describes the activities that you'll do leading the project team.

In this lecture, I'll discuss the balance between management and leadership that you'll need to know for your PMI-ACP exam.

Adaptive Leadership
06:57

As an agile project manager you're responsible for building high-performance teams. While no one can make a group of individuals a team, per se, you can help facilitate the process. 

This section of the PMI-ACP exam is worth 16 percent of your exam score. You'll be presented with roughly 19 questions, so grasp the information in this section on high-performing teams.

PMI-ACP Exam Domain: Team Performance
16:34

On the PMI-ACP examination you’ll be faced with 19 exam questions about agile team management. In this lecture we’ll discuss one of the most important concepts of this exam domain: building agile teams.

In this lecture we’re going to take a deep look at:

  • Create a shared vision for the project team
  • Set realistic goals
  • Limit team size to 12 or fewer people
  • Build a sense of team identity
  • Provide strong leadership 
Creating a Collaborative Team Space
10:24

In this final lecture of the PMI-ACP examination domain we’ll discuss tracking team performance. This is all about ensuring the project team is delivering on their promises and commitments to the project stakeholders.

In this lecture we’ll discuss burndown and burnup charts, team velocity, and calculating completion time. This is a quick and easy lecture – let’s knock it out right now!

Tracking Team Performance in an Agile Project
08:02

Great job finishing up this section on managing agile project teams. In this lecture we’ll take a quick look back at what you’ve learned in this section and I’ll highlight some of the most important topics.

This review lecture is always a good thing to review as you move through the course so you don’t lose touch with these topics.

Team Performance Section Wrap
03:03

Ready for a quiz? The quiz for this chapter is in the Lecture Resources. It’s a PDF document that you can download and complete. This is an easy quiz! It’s meant to refresh you on what you’ve just learned and to underscore the important topics from the lecture.

Will these questions be just like the actual PMI-ACP examination? No. I’ve written these to be similar, but there’s no telling what PMI may do on the actual exam.

Chapter Quiz
05:17

This is fun little game to test what you've learned in this section. Click the link to launch this interactive learning game.

Team Performance Learning Game
00:06
+
PMI-ACP Exam Domain: Adaptive Planning
9 Lectures 01:04:04

Agile, by its very nature, is adaptive. This section will cover your ability to produce and maintain an evolving plan, from initiation to closure, based on goals, values, risks, constraints, stakeholder feedback, and review findings.

The PMI-ACP exam domain includes:

  • 10 tasks
  • 3 subdomains
  • 12 percent of exam; 14 questions  


Adaptive Planning Section Overview
03:15

Welcome to the adaptive planning PMI-ACP examination domain. This lecture is a brief overview of what adaptive planning and our goals for this section of the course. In this section we’ll cover three important adaptive planning subdomains:

  • Levels of planning
  • Adaptation
  • Estimation
  • Velocity/throughput/cycle time

Let’s get started on this section by completing this lecture overview right now.

Preview 02:16

Adaptive planning is different than predictive-type projects. In predictive projects the entire plan and concept is known before the project work begins. In agile projects, we expect changes to happen, so the entire plan isn’t known when the work begins.

There are five takeaways in this lecture:

  • Agile projects are value-driven
  • Minimize non-value-added work
  • Plan to replan
  • Early plans are necessary, but they’re likely flawed
  • Uncertainty requires replanning
Defining Adaptive Planning
18:56

Adaptive planning is a smaller PMI-ACP examination domain; it is worth 12 percent of the exam. This exam domain will challenge you with 14 exam questions – that’s 14 questions in your favor if you grasp this information!

There are some key tasks for adaptive planning you should be familiar with for the PMI-ACP examination:

  • Progressive elaboration and rolling wave planning
  • Transparent planning and key stakeholders
  • Managing expectations by refining plans
  • Adjusting planning cadence based on project factors and results
  • Inspect and adapt the plans to changing events
  • Size items first independently of team velocity
  • Adjust capacity for maintenance and operations demands to update estimates
  • Start planning with high-level scope schedule and cost range estimates
  • Refine ranges as the project progresses
  • Use actuals to refine the estimate to complete 
Exploring the Agile Planning Concepts
11:30

Estimating and sizing an agile project can be tricky, but there are some approaches you can take in your project management practice. In this lecture we’ll discuss these approaches for sizing and estimating agile projects.

There are three consistent themes in estimating and sizing an agile project:

  • Not as precise as predictive planning
  • More uncertainty and agile projects
  • Include a range of variance 
Reviewing the Tools for Project Sizing and Estimating
10:18

You and the project team will work with the product owner and other stakeholders to define the release and iterations of the project deliverables. In this lecture we’ll discuss how best to plan iterations and releases in an agile project.

So much of this conversation is based on visioning, a part of high-level planning:

  • Prior to planning the first release
  • Mapping out the overall effort of the project
  • Product owner and sponsor
  • Key team members
  • Other major stakeholders
Planning for Releases and Iterations
08:24

That’s the end of this section on adaptive planning. While this section was short (and hopefully easy) don’t underestimate it for the PMI-ACP examination. If you really know this short and easy section you’ll have 14 questions in your favor.

In this wrap-up video we’ll review these three concepts:

  • Adaptive planning
  • Project sizing and estimating
  • Planning for releases and iterations
Adaptive Planning Section Wrap
04:02

Ready for a quiz? The quiz for this chapter is in the Lecture Resources. It’s a PDF document that you can download and complete. This is an easy quiz! It’s meant to refresh you on what you’ve just learned and to underscore the important topics from the lecture.

Will these questions be just like the actual PMI-ACP examination? No. I’ve written these to be similar, but there’s no telling what PMI may do on the actual exam.

Chapter Quiz
05:16

This is fun little game to test what you've learned in this section. Click the link to launch this interactive learning game.

Adaptive Planning Learning Game
00:06
+
PMI-ACP Exam Domain: Problems, Issues, Detection, and Resolutions
9 Lectures 55:45

Problems will happen in a project - they always do. And while Agile projects are led by the team and the concept of the servant leader, you'll still have to engage and tackle problems. In this section we'll discuss this PMI-ACP Exam domain in detail. This section includes coverage of the five tasks.

On your PMI-ACP exam, this covers 10 percent of exam, roughly12 questions.

You will need to continuously identify problems, impediments, and risks; prioritize and resolve in a timely manner; monitor and communicate the problem resolution status; and implement process improvements to prevent them from occurring again. 


Preview 02:56

This lecture is an overview of the problems, issues, and detection in agile project management. In this lecture I’ll introduce the five tasks you need to know for the PMI-ACP examination. As an agile project manager you will work with your project team and stakeholder to seek out problems and issues.

Part of this domain is creating a safe space where people feel that they can experiment without ramifications if they fail. This is an important part of the PMI-ACP exam concept – fail fast, but learn from the failure.

Let’s hop in and explore these topics right now!

Preview 02:51

In this lecture we’ll discuss the types of problems that can affect an agile project. We’ll look at several things and how you might go about finding a resolution in your agile project. In this lecture we’re going to review these topics:

  • Issues and risks
  • Financial impact of project problems
  • The timeline of where issues are discovered
  • Reviewing technical debt and agile projects
  • Creating a safe environment for the project team
  • Success modes and failure modes
  • Creating success strategies


Resolving Issues: What's the Problem?
14:45

There’s a logical approach to detecting problems in agile projects: ask the project team. This is actually a core piece of the daily standup meeting: Are there any impediments blocking your way? You’ll ask that question everyday for each project team member on the agile project.

In this lecture we’ll examine that topic, but we’ll also look at:

  • Lead time and cycle time
  • Managing work in progress (WIP)
  • Defect cycle time
  • Causes of variances
  • Trend analysis


Finding and Detecting Problems
10:41

Managing Threats and Issues is a task within this PMI-ACP examination domain. In PMP land, risks can be positive or negative. In agile projects, however, we only look at risk as being negative. It’s a threat to the project success.

In this lecture we’re going to focus on three primary concepts:

  • Risk is considered anti value
  • Goal is to attack high-risk items early in the project
  • Items with the greatest value in greatest risk move to the top of the backlog

Know these themes for your PMI-ACP examination.


Managing Project Threats and Issues
10:25

When there’s a problem the project team will look to you, the servant leader, to help resolve the problem. It’s part of the mantra of the servant leader, to remove impediments from blocking the project team. Problem solving is also part of continuous improvement.

In this lecture you’ll want to look for these four concepts:

  • Problem solving games to fix the problem before it happens
  • Consider daily standup
  • Iteration reviews and retrospectives
  • Sprint planning sessions


Managing and Solving Problems
05:35

Great job finishing up this section on finding and resolving problems. Problems and issues are going to happen in every project; some problems you can live with and they’ll work out, other problems you have to attack and find a solution. In this lecture we’ll take a quick look back at what you’ve learned in this section and I’ll highlight some of the most important topics.

This review lecture is always a good thing to review as you move through the course so you don’t lose touch with these topics.

Problems, Issues, Detection, and Resolutions Section Wrap
03:21

Ready for a quiz? The quiz for this chapter is in the Lecture Resources. It’s a PDF document that you can download and complete. This is an easy quiz! It’s meant to refresh you on what you’ve just learned and to underscore the important topics from the lecture.

Will these questions be just like the actual PMI-ACP examination? No. I’ve written these to be similar, but there’s no telling what PMI may do on the actual exam.

Chapter Quiz
05:04

This is fun little game to test what you've learned in this section. Click the link to launch this interactive learning game.

Problem Detection and Resolution Learning Game
00:06
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PMI-ACP Exam Domain: Continuous Improvement
9 Lectures 42:35

One your goals, which we'll cover in this section, is to be continuously improve your project management approaches. In this section we'll discuss:

  • Tailor and adapt the project process by periodically reviewing and integrating team practices, organizational culture, and delivery goals in order to ensure team effectiveness within established organizational guidelines and norms.
  • Improve team processes by conducting frequent retrospectives and improvement experiments in order to continually enhance the effectiveness of the team, project, and organization.
  • Seek feedback on the product by incremental delivery and frequent demonstrations in order to improve the value of the product.

This exam objective is worth 9 percent of the exam score - roughly 11 questions.

Preview 02:55

Continuous improvement is a goal of any project manager in an agile environment. Continuous improvement means that you and the project team look for opportunities to improve the processes, the product, and the people within the project.

In this section we’re going to discuss the process of agile project management that you should look for improvements within. We’ll also look at how the product owner and the project team work together to find improvement opportunities in the product the project is creating. We’ll also look at how the project team and the agile project manager can seek out opportunities to improve the people involved in the project.

Finally, in this section we’ll examine the PMI Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct. You may see a few ethical questions on the PMI-ACP examination. You will also have to agree to abide by these ethical standards when signing up for the PMI-ACP examination.

Preview 02:55

Continuous Process Improvement is an approach to tweak and tailor the processes within your agile project management to help the project, the product owner, the project team, and the customers of the project be better served.

In this lecture I’ll discuss tailoring agile processes. Be on the lookout in the lecture and in your PMI-ACP examination for these themes on process improvement:

  • Adapting agile for your environment
  • There is some risk with tailoring
  • Better to create processes for each project as needed
  • Consider risk and reward 


Implementing Continuous Process Improvement
11:49

Continuous Product Improvement is a key element of agile project management. Throughout the project the project manager, the project team, and the product owner will communicate about the product, the project priorities, and how to be realize value.

The PDCA cycle of Plan-Do-Check-Act is seen over and over in agile project management and is a topic we’ll discuss in this lecture. We’ll also take a look at product feedback and iteration reviews and planning. Let’s hop into this topic and talk more about product improvement for your PMI-ACP examination.

Working towards Continuous Product Improvement
05:10

In this lecture we’ll discuss the improvement of the people on your project team. Throughout the agile project you will have opportunities to lead and coach the project. This will give you insight to what motivates the project team, what demotivates the team, and you’ll see characteristics of the project team members that may be holding themselves and the project back.

Key thoughts for this exam objective are:

  • What is going well?
  • What areas could use improvement?
  • What should we be doing differently?

In this lecture we’ll also discuss some methods you can use to gauge how the team feels about issues, productivity, and the overall project performance.

Leading Continuous People Improvement
10:16

The PMI Code of Ethics and Professional Responsibility is about ethics, truth, and honesty. This document is also part of your PMI Exam application process. You are required to read this document and agree to its terms as part of your testing application.

During the PMI-ACP exam, you'll be tested on these concepts:

  • Complying with rules and policies
  • Being an honest project manager
  • Advancing the profession
  • Enforcing truth and honesty
  • Eliminating inappropriate actions
PMI Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct
00:29

This section discussed four key things for your role as an agile project manager and for the PMI-ACP examination:

  • Continuous Improvement for Processes
  • Continuous Improvement for the Product
  • Continuous Improvement for People
  • PMI Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct

Continuous improvement is a goal of any project manager in an agile environment. Continuous improvement means that you and the project team look for opportunities to improve the processes, the product, and the people within the project.

Continuous Improvement Section Wrap
02:35

Ready for a quiz? The quiz for this chapter is in the Lecture Resources. It’s a PDF document that you can download and complete. This is an easy quiz! It’s meant to refresh you on what you’ve just learned and to underscore the important topics from the lecture.

Will these questions be just like the actual PMI-ACP examination? No. I’ve written these to be similar, but there’s no telling what PMI may do on the actual exam.

Chapter Quiz
06:19

This is fun little game to test what you've learned in this section. Click the link to launch this interactive learning game.

Continuous Improvement Learning Game
00:06
+
Wrapping Up the Course
6 Lectures 01:48:10

Welcome to this final section in the PMI-ACP Exam Prep Course. You’ve covered lots of ground and hopefully learned lots of new topics. In this final section we’ll discuss just a few important things:

  • How to create a study strategy
  • Why you should apply now for the PMI-ACP examination
  • How to study to pass the PMI-ACP examination
  • Your certificate of course completion

Let’s wrap this course up with this quick and easy section on the PMI-ACP examination.

Finalizing the PMI-ACP Exam Prep Course
07:11

Now that you’ve completed the PMI-ACP Exam Prep course you’re probably ready to complete the PMI-ACP examination application. In this video I’ll walk through the process of how to complete the application with your experience and education qualifications.

In this lecture I’ll also discuss your certificate of completion. You’ll only need this certificate if your application is selected for a random audit. If you’re a PMP or another PMI certification holder you can claim this course for 21 PDUs. In this lecture I’ll also provide that information and how you can claim your PDUs.

PMI-ACP Exam Prep Completion
05:01

Ready for a final exam?

The final exam for this course is in the Lecture Resources. It’s a PDF document that you can download and complete. This exam is meant to refresh you on what you’ve just learned and to underscore the important topics from the lecture.

Will these questions be just like the actual PMI-ACP examination? No. I’ve written these to be similar, but there’s no telling what PMI may do on the actual exam.

Final PMI-ACP Practice Exam
17:22

This is the course glossary.

This glossary is part of your assignment and will only help you better recognize terms for the PMI-ACP exam. If you can recognize the terms and understand their meaning, you’ll have a better probability of answering questions correctly and passing the exam.

Reviewing the Course Glossary
18:09

Let’s wrap this thing up!

Congratulations on completing the entire PMI-ACP Exam Prep course. I know that learning can be hard work, but you’ve made it through all of the material, you’ve learned much, and you are well on your way to earning the PMI-ACP certification.

In this final lecture we’re going to take a look back at all of the exam objectives for the PMI-ACP examination. I’ll discuss:

  • Domain I. Agile Principles and Mindset -16 percent
  • Domain II. Value-driven Delivery - 20 percent
  • Domain III. Stakeholder Engagement - 17 percent
  • Domain IV. Team Performance - 16 percent
  • Domain V. Adaptive Planning - 12 percent
  • Domain VI. Problem Detection and Resolution - 10 percent
  • Domain VII. Continuous Improvement - 9 percent

The PMI-REP Certificate of Completion is a resource for this lecture. Be sure to download the certificate.

Course Wrap and Your Next Steps
07:35

This quiz will challenge your recollection of the PMI-ACP terms. It's a "fill-in-the-blank" style quiz based directly on the glossary of agile terms included in this course. 

The quiz is shared here both as an article and a downloadable PDF document.

PMI-ACP Glossary Quiz
52:52
About the Instructor
Joseph Phillips
4.6 Average rating
5,395 Reviews
34,078 Students
25 Courses
PMP, PMI-ACP, Project+, ITIL, Certified Technical Trainer

Joseph Phillips has more than 15 years’ experience as a project management consultant, educator, technology consultant, business owner, and technical writer. He has consulted as a project manager for a range of businesses, including startups, hospitals, architectural firms, and manufacturers.  Joseph is passionate about helping students pass the PMP certification exam.  He has created and led both in-person and web-based seminars on project management, PMP certification, IT project management, program management, writing, business analysis, technical writing, and related topics.  Joseph has written, co-authored, or served as technical editor to more than 35 books on technology, careers, project management, and goal setting for MacMillan, McGraw-Hill, Pearson Education, and AMA Press.

Certifications:

Project Management Professional (PMP)

PMI-Agile Certified Practitioner (PMI-ACP)

CompTIA Project+ Professional

CompTIA Certified Technical Trainer+

Certified ITIL Foundations Professional

Author of:

PMP Project Management Professional Study Guide, McGraw-Hill

CAPM/PMP All-in-One Exam Guide, McGraw-Hill

PMP Project Management Lab Book, McGraw-Hill

The Certified Technical Trainer All-in-One Exam Guide, McGraw-Hill

IT Project Management: On Track from Start to Finish, McGraw-Hill

Project Management for Small Business, American Management Association 

Software Project Management for Dummies, For Dummies Publisher

The Lifelong Project, Amazon CreateSpace

Vampire ManagementWhy Your Job Sucks, Amazon CreateSpace