PMI-ACP Certification: Initiation and Requirements Gathering
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PMI-ACP Certification: Initiation and Requirements Gathering

Agile Certified Practitioner Certification Program - Course 4 of 8 - Initiation and Requirements Gathering
4.7 (22 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
2,067 students enrolled
Created by Sorin Dumitrascu
Last updated 7/2017
English
English
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Current price: $10 Original price: $175 Discount: 94% off
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Includes:
  • 2 hours on-demand video
  • 2 Articles
  • 27 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Recognize the levels of agile planning, understand the benefits of having a plan for an agile project, and identify activities that take place during the different phases of agile planning
  • Understand the essential elements of a business case, identify the elements of product vision, analyze an example of a use case, and develop examples of user stories.
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • Useful but not compulsory to study before - Course 1: Agile Project Management Essentials, Course 2 - Adopting an Agile Approach and Course 3 - The Scrum Development Process.
  • Courses under development - Course 5: Planning and Monitoring Iterations on an Agile Project; Course 6: Leading an Agile Team; Course 7: Managing Stakeholder Engagement on an Agile Project
  • This is course 4 of 8 from the Agile Project Management - The PMI-ACP (Agile Certified Practitioner) Certification Program
Description

Welcome to the 4th course of the Agile Project Management - The PMI-ACP (Agile Certified Practitioner) Certification Program. This course is focused on Agile Planning and more precisely on Project Initiating and Requirements Gathering.

Who will benefit from taking this course

This course is intended for project managers, program managers, or anyone who wants to efficiently participate in agile projects. It is aligned with the Agile Certified Practitioner exam objectives developed by the Project Management Institute® and Certified ScrumMaster learning objectives.

The course includes training videos, examples, exercices and quizes. And, if you take your time to go through all the learning materials this will entitle you to claim 5 PDU’s for the PMI certification exams and to maintain your PMI certification.

An agile development team uses rolling wave planning and progressive elaboration, refining and adjusting plans at various points throughout a project's life cycle. Planning is beneficial because it reduces risk and uncertainty, improves decision-making, fosters trust, and makes it easier to pass on information to stakeholders.

Three levels of planning

Agile teams focus on three levels of planning. During release planning, the customer and developers collaborate to provide high-level information on what user stories, or features, and how many iterations, to include in a product release.

During iteration planning, a team conducts detailed planning of the tasks to complete in a specific iteration. This planning is informed by the results of previous iterations. Daily planning occurs during brief meetings, when developers discuss their progress, immediate plans, and any obstacles.

Release and iteration planning

In an agile approach, release planning involves gathering requirements, creating user stories, prioritizing stories, estimating stories, grouping stories, and setting a release date.

Iteration planning is more detailed. It involves updating requirements, confirming user stories and priorities, decomposing stories into tasks, and refining estimates before each new iteration begins.

A business case and a product vision

The first step in planning an agile project is developing a business case and a product vision.  The business case is a short document outlining the opportunity that a project represents, the project's goals and a strategy for achieving them, a project vision, milestones, the required investment, and the expected payback.

The product vision is a description of what will be delivered  -  which is encapsulated in a vision statement, of who will be involved in creating a product, and of how the work will be done.

A project scope and a use case

A project's scope is the extent of the work it includes. Using an agile approach, a team controls project scope by focusing only on developing functionality that is of direct value to the customer.

A use case provides an overview of a project's scope. It describes how users must be able to interact with a system, and the required results. It also describes exceptions, or the steps that must occur in response to system errors.

User stories

User stories break down the project's high-level requirements into specific, discrete requirements for particular product functions. They're usually expressed using the wording "As a <role>, I want to <do something> so that I can <achieve a result>." An agile team may need to break large user stories, known as epics, into smaller stories as a project progresses. It may also group related user stories into themes. 

This course will have two main sections. The first one is called Introduction to Agile Planning and the second Initiating and Scoping an Agile Project.

After completing the first section, Introduction to Agile Planning, you  be able to:

  • recognize the levels of agile planning,
  • understand the benefits of having a plan for an agile project,
  • identify activities that take place during the different phases of agile planning.

After completing the second section, Initiating and Scoping an Agile Project, you  will be able to:

  • understand the essential elements of a business case,
  • identify the elements of product vision,
  • analyze an example of a use case,
  • develop examples of user stories.

So, thank you for considering this course! Now, go ahead, and hit that "Take This Course" button. And, see you on the inside.

Who is the target audience?
  • Intended for project managers, program managers, or anyone who wants to efficiently participate in agile projects.
  • Aligned with the Agile Certified Practitioner exam objectives developed by the Project Management Institute® and Certified ScrumMaster learning objectives
  • Will entitle you to claim 5 PDU’s for the PMI certification exams and to maintain your PMI certification
Students Who Viewed This Course Also Viewed
Curriculum For This Course
15 Lectures
02:01:31
+
Course Introduction
3 Lectures 18:40

Welcome to the 4th course of the Agile Project Management - The PMI-ACP (Agile Certified Practitioner) Certification Program. This one is focused on Agile Planning and more precisely on Project Initiating and Requirements Gathering.

Preview 05:01

This video will help you understand better the content of the other courses that will form this Agile Project Management - The PMI-ACP (Agile Certified Practitioner) Certification Program. And, just to be clear, because what I call section in the larger Certification Program, is a course by itself, let’s see what every section includes.

Preview 10:22

A short presentation of the the tools that you have on Udemy.

Preview 03:17

Welcome to the 4th course of the Agile Project Management - The PMI-ACP (Agile Certified Practitioner) Certification Program. This one is focused on Agile Planning and more precisely on Project Initiating and Requirements Gathering.

Course Introduction
3 questions
+
Introduction to Agile Planning
4 Lectures 43:06

Project planning involves thinking about how to complete a project within a certain timeframe, usually with defined stages and with designated resources. The success of a project will depend in part on the effort and skill you apply during planning.

Benefits of planning
13:41

Project planning occurs at various levels, each providing a different degree of detail and occurring at different times in the project development life cycle.

Levels of agile planning
11:03

Agile project planning is cyclical and ongoing, with different types of planning repeated throughout the project life cycle. Project planning is usually either date-driven or feature-driven. In a date-driven - or time-boxed - project, the release date is set but the set of features that will be included in the product release is uncertain.

Agile planning activities
12:58

A project team is updating the web site of QuickTravel, an outdoor adventure company. The team's instructions are to change the site's look and feel, and to add search, reservation, and payment tools. The team knows what to build, but it is not sure why the customer has requested the changes or which functionality is the most important. As a result, the team runs over budget and develops a product that doesn't fully align to the customer's business objectives.

Planning an agile project
05:24

Recognize the levels of agile planning, understand the benefits of having a plan for an agile project, and identify activities that take place during the different phases of agile planning

Introduction to Agile Planning
4 questions
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Initiating and Scoping an Agile Project
5 Lectures 51:31

Whereas traditional project management is plan-driven, agile planning is value-driven. Value in this context refers to the financial worth of a project to the customer. The purpose of a business case is to confirm that a project will create value for the customer right from the start. A business case addresses questions about a proposed project's economic, technical, operational, and political impact on the customer.

Creating a business case
07:47

For an agile project, a product vision describes how a product can capitalize on the opportunities and fulfill the goals outlined in the business case. It should provide all stakeholders, including developers, with a common understanding of what's required, without limiting the team's creativity in finding solutions.

Some may think that with an agile methodology, the customer can simply take an "I'll know it when I see it" approach to specifying what's required. However, this would make planning and estimation nearly impossible.

Elements of a product vision
10:56

Agile teams are highly responsive to changes in customer expectations and market conditions. However, an agile project isn't without boundaries. Time and money, for example, aren't unlimited - so there have to be some limits on what can change, and the changes can't go on forever.

Defining project scope
02:00

A project manager defines the scope of a traditionally managed project using a work breakdown structure, or WBS. An agile team, however, defines and manages scope using techniques for capturing requirements, such as use cases.

Developing use cases
12:28

Use cases provide a big-picture overview of a system and of a project's scope. They can, however, be quite detailed and may not be very suitable for use in planning and estimating. An alternative technique, possibly used in addition to a high-level use case, involves breaking down project requirements into user stories. Each user story describes a specific, required functionality, which is defined from a user's perspective. Together all the user stories for a project provide a detailed description of the project's requirements.

Formatting user stories
18:20

Understand the essential elements of a business case, identify the elements of product vision, analyze an example of a use case, and develop examples of user stories.

Initiating and Scoping an Agile Project
5 questions
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Agile Planning: Initiation and Requirements Gathering
3 Lectures 08:57

Course project (optional).

Course project (optional)
01:10

You just finished the 4th course of the Agile Project Management - The PMI-ACP (Agile Certified Practitioner) Certification Program.

This one was focused on Agile Planning and more precisely on Project Initiating and Requirements Gathering.

Agile Planning - Project Initiating and Requirements Gathering
04:59

Course wrap-up and next steps.

Agile Planning: Initiation and Requirements Gathering
1 question

Special offer - 90% discounted courses

Preview 02:48
About the Instructor
Sorin Dumitrascu
4.4 Average rating
2,029 Reviews
23,902 Students
38 Courses
Management trainer

Before Udemy, Sorin developed and delivered on management, project management, computer literacy, human resources, career development, soft skills for employees and even corrections incidents management.

Currently working as a prison service consultant, he is a certified trainer and project manager, holding a master degree in International Relations and Policy Making and a bachelor degree in Law and Public Administration.

Sorin coordinated during the last 10 years projects in the areas of rule of law, regional development and human resources.

He has more than 10 years of middle/senior managerial experience within the civil service (justice, corrections, internal affairs, training), private sector (project management, consultancy, training) and NGO (industrial relations, rural development).

Sorin is also a certified International Computer Driving License (ICDL) tester and trainer for the United Nations Peacekeeping Missions, certified Human Resource Professional and a Public Manager (professional degree).