Physical Computing with Scratch using Raspberry Pi
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Physical Computing with Scratch using Raspberry Pi

The version of Scratch with Raspberry Pi has many unique features; one being its ability to communicate with GPIO pins.
4.1 (4 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
69 students enrolled
Last updated 12/2016
English
Current price: $10 Original price: $95 Discount: 89% off
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Includes:
  • 3 hours on-demand video
  • 21 Articles
  • 6 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Control the Raspberry Pi GPIO pins using Scratch
  • Receive input from the Raspberry Pi GPIO pins using Scratch
  • Create IoT application through ScratchGPIO with Python to send notification to your mail
  • Multiple projects to work on ScratchGPIO using Raspberry Pi
  • Connect a passive infra-red (PIR) sensor to the Raspberry Pi
  • Control the flow of your Scratch program by responding to the input from the sensor
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • Basic knowledge of Scratch is requires to get started with the course
  • Any model of Raspberry Pi
  • The new Raspbian version along with that, Raspberry has included the latest Scratch system update
  • Complete beginner sensor module kit
Description

Hello, learners! Greetings from Makerdemy. In this course, you will learn how to program the ScratchGPIO on Raspberry to work on the Physical Computing with Scratch.

Scratch is a very accessible and easy to learn programming framework for both young children and adults. Its close association with the Raspberry Pi and its educational emphasis has been a perfect match.

The ScratchGPIO project brings control and sensing of the Pi's low-level GPIO pins to Scratch in a very powerful way. It continues to enhance the package to support LCD screens, motors, compass components, distance sensors, and other electronic and robotic components.

The level of hardware control offered by the ScratchGPIO package allows even beginner programmers the ability to interact with the physical world with a simple and familiar programming framework.

A new version of Scratch for Raspberry Pi added with the GPIO pins. In this course will guide you how to use Scratch Programming Language with the Raspberry Pi.

The Scratch included with the Raspberry Pi has some unique features; one of the most useful is its ability to communicate with the GPIO pins (General Purpose Input Output). These pins allow you to connect your Raspberry Pi to a range of devices, from lights and motors to buttons and sensors. The original Raspberry Pi had a 26-pin header and newer models (B+, Pi 2, Pi 3, etc.) have a 40-pin header, but in this course, I will be using the Raspberry Pi 3 model.

The Raspberry Pi is great hardware microcontroller to get starting with Scratch. This course is ideal for those who are interested in exploring the possibilities of Physical computing with Raspberry Pi using ScratchGPIO. Basic knowledge of Scratch is required to get started with the course. The GPIO pins on a Raspberry Pi are a great way to interface with physical devices like resistors and sensors with the Scratch.

By following this course, you will learn how to install the ScratchGPIO package, where to look for more information about it and Scratch. Also, you will assemble an easy to use breadboard circuits, motors, PIR sensors, Relay, Touch sensor, Ultrasonic sensor to measure the distance and mail notification, etc., that will allow you to experiment safely with Scratch and GPIO control for both input and output.

Finally, you will create a game that can be used as an example and a basis to be modified to learn and experiment. As the ScratchGPIO project continues to mature and expand, you can look forward to seeing a whole new generation of Raspberry Pi robotics controlled by Scratch.

Who is the target audience?
  • This course is ideal for those who are interested in exploring the possibilities of Physical computing with Raspberry Pi using ScratchGPIO
  • The GPIO pins on a Raspberry Pi are a great way to interface with physical devices like resistors and sensors with the Scratch
  • No prior knowledge of programming or coding is required
  • Engineering Students - Electronics, Electrical & Computer Science
  • Electronic Geeks, Hobbiest & Art Students
  • High School Science Students
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Curriculum For This Course
55 Lectures
03:00:13
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Introduction
2 Lectures 04:59

This lecture covers brief description about the complete course of ScratchGPIO project brings control and sensing of the Pi's low-level GPIO pins to Scratch in a very powerful way.

Preview 01:21

This lecture covers brief description about the new version of Scratch for Raspberry Pi added with the GPIO pins. In this course will guide you how to use Scratch Programming Language with the Raspberry Pi.

Preview 03:38
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Physical Computing with ScratchGPIO
3 Lectures 07:54

This lecture covers brief description about new GPIO server for Pi Scratch is the first pass at a new, and hopefully, simpler way for users to connect Scratch to the Raspberry Pi’s GPIO pins. ScratchGPIO as easy as possible to start up and run. The ScratchGPIO is designed as an easy way to use Scratch on the Raspberry Pi to control lights/motors/sensors and switches using the GPIO pins.

General Purpose Input/Output(GPIO)
01:27

This lecture covers brief description about the How to Install the ScratchGPIO and set up with the LXTerminal.

Preview 02:14

This lecture covers brief description about the GPIO pins allow the Raspberry Pi to control and monitor the outside world by being connected to electronic circuits

Raspberry GPIO
04:13
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ScratchGPIO: Basic configuration broadcast and GPIO Server commands
2 Lectures 08:29

This lecture covers brief description about the GPIOServer: Usage and basic capabilities. And you will see, what are all the different ways to call the broadcast commands.

GPIOServer: Usage and Basic Capabilities
02:40

This lecture covers brief description about the ScratchGPIO commands in different was to communicate with Raspberry Pi.

What more can I do with ScratchGPIO
05:49
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Lighting an LED
3 Lectures 04:38

This lecture covers brief description about how to build the Lighting a LED using ScratchGPIO program with Raspberry Pi. How to circuit the connection and this lecture shows the real time demonstration of this project.

Lighting an LED
04:37

This lecture shows the circuit diagram of Testing GPIO pins and LED lighting.

1.Circuit_Diagram_Lighting an LED_Testing GPIO pins and LED
00:00

This lecture shows the circuit diagram of Lighting an LED using Switchable pin.

2.Circuit_Diagram_Lighting an LED_Using a Switchable Pin
00:00
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Controlling an LED with a Button Push
3 Lectures 06:14

This lecture covers brief description about how to connect a button to a LED to control it. It gives the response with a button press using ScratchGPIO program with Raspberry Pi. As well as controlling the physical world, you can react to it using an input device such as a button.

Controlling an LED with a Button Push
06:13

This lecture shows the circuit diagram of how to connect the Button to control with Scratch program.

3.Circuit_Diagram_Connecting a Button
00:00

This lecture shows the circuit diagram of how to control the LED with a Push Button.

4.Circuit_Diagram_Controlling a LED with a Push Button
00:00
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Buzzer Controller
2 Lectures 02:30

This lecture covers brief description about how an active buzzer can be connect just like a LED, but as they are a little more robust, you won't be needing a resistor to protect them. We will connect buzzer and a LED. Buzzer tones will make it different by programming with a delay.

Using an Active Buzzer
02:30

This lecture shows the circuit diagram of how to Active the Buzzer with Scratch program.

5.Circuit_Diagram_Using an Active Buzzer
00:00

Physical Computing with Scratch
4 questions
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Passive infrared Motion Sensor(PIR)
2 Lectures 07:10

This lecture covers brief description about the PIR sensor detects changes in the amount of IR radiation (heat) it receives. When there is a change, then a pulse is triggered. This means that a PIR sensor can detect when a human (or any animal) moves in front of it.

By creating a detector with your Raspberry Pi you will learn:

-         How to connect a passive infra-red (PIR) sensor to the Raspberry Pi

-         How to control the flow of your Scratch program by responding to the input from the sensor.

Passive infrared Motion Sensor(PIR)
07:10

This lecture shows the circuit diagram of Passive Infrared Motion Sensor (PIR) connection.

6.Circuit_Diagram_Passive Infrared Motion Sensor (PIR)
00:00
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Ultrasonic distance measure with a LCD and a Buzzer
2 Lectures 09:39

This lecture covers brief description about how to build Raspberry Pi-based ultrasonic rangefinder, which can easily measure the distance and turned on the buzzer and Led in the stern time limit.

Ultrasonic Sensor
09:39

This lecture shows the circuit diagram of Ultrasonic sensor distance measure using Buzzer and LED.

7.Circuit_Diagram_Ultrasonic Sensor
00:00
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DC Motor Control Using L293D in ScratchGPIO with Raspberry Pi
8 Lectures 22:00

This lecture covers brief description about how to control the DC Motor using L293D in ScratchGPIO with Raspberry Pi. In this project, what we plan to do is safely connect one or two motors to the Raspberry Pi using ScratchGPIO with as few components as possible. Once we have the electronics put together on the breadboard, I will show you how to control them easily using ScratchGPIO first to make the motor spin, and then add some control to change the motor direction so we can go backward.

Preview 03:30

This lecture covers brief description about the complete hardware requirements of this project. Concept behind the L239D IC, working status of L293D IC and Truth table to control the two motors.

Hardware requirements and Concept of L239D IC
03:33

This lecture covers brief description about how to construct the Raspberry Pi Bot.

Building the Pi Car
02:25

This lecture covers brief description about the complete connection between the circuit of motors, driver and Raspberry Pi with the Pin configuration.

Assembling the Circuit
03:34

This lecture shows the circuit diagram of Motor Controller Using L293D with Scratch program.

8.Circuit_Diagram_Motor Controller Using L293D with Scratch
00:00

This lecture covers brief description about the construction of ScratchGPIO program. In the ScratchGPIO start the GPIO serveron, then configure the broadcast pin numbers to the two motors. We’re using the pin numbers: 16, 18, 19, and 21. And real time demonstration of this project.

Constructing ScratchGPIO program
05:36

In a previous lectures, we've outlined Scratch bot car, all of which can plug directly into the Raspberry Pi's GPIO ports. Here, Adding the HC-SR04 Ultrasonic Distance Measuring Sensor Module into the Scratch bot car. The HC-SR04 ultrasonic range finder is very simple to use, however, the signal it outputs needs to be converted from 5V to 3.3V so as not to damage our Raspberry Pi! I will introduce some Physics along with Electronics in this tutorial to explain each step!

Preview 03:21

This lecture shows the circuit diagram of Obstacle avoidance_Motor car.

9.Circuit_Diagram_Obstacle avoidance on the motor car
00:00
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LED based DICE for Monopoly game
2 Lectures 06:52

This lecture covers brief description about how to make the LEDs based dice for monopoly. Aren't we all bored with the usual 6 faced dice while playing Monopoly or Ludo. How does it sound to use a completely digital dice made up of LEDs to do the same? Good? Then, let’s start making one.

LED based DICE for Monopoly Game
06:52

This lecture shows the circuit diagram of LED based DICE for Monopoly.

10.Circuit_Diagram_LED based DICE for Monopoly
00:00

Physical Computing with Scratch
4 questions
12 More Sections
About the Instructor
Venkatesh Varadachari
4.0 Average rating
692 Reviews
12,122 Students
31 Courses
Founder of ScratchNinja, PiWizards and Money-Wizards

Venkatesh Varadachari is the founder of Money-Wizards Global Pte Ltd, that owns the education brands Money-Wizards, PiWizards and Scratch Ninja.

Venkatesh believes that knowledge should be made available to people in all walks of life. Venkatesh also believes in the power of education to transform lives.

Venkatesh has an MBA from the prestigious Indian Institute of Management, Bangalore.

He also has a degree in Electrical Engineering from Madras University and a Masters in Financial Engineering from National University of Singapore.

Kamesh Dkr
4.4 Average rating
155 Reviews
5,493 Students
11 Courses
Product Engineer - Technology

Kamesh DKR is passionate about working at the intersection of technology and education. He believes that learning should be fun, entertaining and contextual.

Kamesh has a Masters in Computer Applications from VIT, one of the top engineering schools in India.

Kamesh is a product engineer with ScratchNinja and is responsible for developing user friendly educational courses to teach cutting edge technological concepts to school students.