Mind Your Self: Learn The Power of NOW with Mindfulness.

Bring Mindfulness into your everyday life and Increase clarity, focus & happiness. Know where your life is going & why.
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  • Lectures 22
  • Length 2.5 hours
  • Skill Level All Levels
  • Languages English
  • Includes Lifetime access
    30 day money back guarantee!
    Available on iOS and Android
    Certificate of Completion
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About This Course

Published 1/2014 English

Course Description

Course Improved and Updated February 2016

Take a look at the preview video below of my Introductory Lecture for a short mindfulness exercise.

Mindfulness is paying attention, on purpose and without judgement, to the present moment. It is the development of a life philosophy of "We are where we are. It is what it is. Now, how can we make it (even) better?" It is the development of compassion and kindness towards yourself and others. It is a way of life that brings enjoyment, fulfilment and happiness.

Mindfulness can reduce Clinical Depression

Just 8 weeks of Mindfulness Meditation can change the structure of our brain, resulting in the reduction of symptoms of Clinical Depression, according to research carried out by such trusted institutions as The Massachusetts General Hospital.

Mindfulness can increase our Happiness

Stress, depression and anxiety take their toll on happiness. With Mindfulness practice and other tools, we can improve our focus, clarity and overall happiness.

In other words, we can actually learn to be happy.

If you want to reduce stress and take more control over your life, then this course is for you.

·Learn, step-by-step, the basics of mindfulness meditation.

·Use mindfulness in everyday situations to bring you greater clarity, focus and calm and kindness.

·Gain lifelong access to Mindfulness Meditations and Exercises such as Loving Kindness, Mindfulness for Pain Management and Mindful Thinking.

·I also update and add to the course regularly with new material and the latest techniques and information. So you get extra material at no extra cost.

·Information and links to relevant articles are posted in the Discussion Boards and Announcements section

I AM AVAILABLE TO ANSWER ANY QUESTIONS OR PROVIDE SUPPORT IF YOU'RE HAVING DIFFICULTY WITH YOUR MINDFULNESS MEDITATIONS OR PRACTICE.

Just message me via my profile page or via the discussion box on the course.

It's unlikely, but if, within 30 days of enrolling, you feel my course did not benefit you, you get a 100%-no-questions-asked-refund.

So, you have absolutely nothing to lose by ENROLLING NOW

What are the requirements?

  • As mentioned above, you do not need to have any former knowledge or experience of meditation.
  • It would also be helpful to you if you can find the time to practice the meditations everyday
  • Set your own goal for each meditation. Stretch yourself a little, while being realistic at the same time. Remember the more you practice the more mindfulness becomes a habit.

What am I going to get from this course?

  • Lower your stress levels
  • Be more calm and relaxed
  • Have less anxiety
  • See your thoughts and/or worries in a more positive light
  • Increase your focus and concentration
  • Have more restful sleep
  • Improve your memory
  • Handle pain or illness better
  • Understand yourself more clearly
  • See yourself and others in a more positive light
  • Learning to live and meditate mindfully can help to change your perspective. This in turn can change your attitude to problems, people and situations in your life.

What is the target audience?

  • This course is intended for anyone who would like to gain more clairty in their life and to increase their overall well-being and happiness. it does not require any previous knowledge of mindfulness or meditation, nor does it exclude those of you who do have such knowledge

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee.

Forever yours.
Lifetime access.

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android.

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section 1: The Basics of Meditation
I Am Here to Help
Article
06:18

This is a brief demonstration of Mindfulness. Experiencing something first hand is the quickest and most powerful way of understanding it. Just follow along with the instructions to get the feel of what practising mindfulness is all about.


By the end of this lecture, you will have an understanding of what the practice of mindfulness involves.



00:28

It's a good idea to turn off Autoplay so that you're not disturbed by the next lecture playing just when you've finished the previous meditation and are feeling nice and relaxed. The Autoplay button is underneath the video and you only need to do it once. It will apply to all videos.

06:09

At the end of this lecture you will know the steps to calming your mind and body in preparation for your meditation.

Begin with some deep breathing to calm and settle the body and mind

Incorporate any sounds, odours, sights or feelings into the meditation by becomming aware of them and acknowledging that they are here now, and that they will probably continue being there during the meditation.

Try not to judge whether anything is good or bad. Just passively observe.

All pictures copyright of Anne Kelly

(Music for this meditation: The Temple by Ray Lynch (Published by Ray Lunch Productions) retrieved from www.meditation.org.au 2012 - The Meditation Society of Australia)

12:55

At the end of this lecture, you will be able to identify the parts of your body that are relaxed and those that are not. As you practice, you will eventually be able to release all the tension in your body.

Imagine there's a beautiful white light pouring through your body, taking away any tension with it as it flows.

Pay attention to each part of your body, beginning with your feet and working up to your head, releasing tension as you go.

All pictures copyright of Anne Kelly

(Music for this meditation: Painting the Ocean by Robert Norton. Retrieved from www.meditation.org.au 2012 - The Meditation Society of Australia)

03:47

At the end of this lecture, you will be familiar with the technique of paying attention to nothing other than your breathing. With practice, you will find it easier and easier to gently release thoughts.

Try to be aware of your breathing without changing it. Your body breathes by itself, without your conscious help. Just observe, passively, its rhythm, allowing thoughts to come and go but always bringing your attention back to the breathing.

All pictures copyright of Anne Kelly

(Music for this meditation: Distant sounds of the Sea by Jon Short of Deep Sky Divers (Published by Anyrobinhood) retrieved from www.meditation.org.au 2012 - The Meditation Society of Australia)

04:15

No matter how practiced you are, it’s never a good idea to jump up straight away from a meditation. Apart from giving you a head rush, it can also leave you feeling unsteady and unfocused for the rest of the day.

At the end of this lecture, you will be familiar with the technique of drawing your meditation to a close gently and naturally.

    Bring your attention back to the imaginary light that is still flowing through you and imagine drawing it up again through your body, checking as you go that each part of your body is still relaxed and free from tension.

    Bring your attention once again to the sounds inside the room and remember where you are seated. Feel the chair beneath and behind you, supporting you.

    Rub your hands together and place your palms lightly over your eyes. Open your eyes and remove your hands

    Take a moment to observe how your body feels, and to observe the room around you.

    When you have reached the end of this lesson, you will find a downloadable version of all 5 lessons put together in one meditation. Practice and enjoy!

    All pictures copyright of Anne Kelly

    (Music for this meditation: Distant sounds of the Sea by Jon Short of Deep Sky Divers (Published by Anyrobinhood) retrieved from www.meditation.org.au 2012 - The Meditation Society of Australia)

02:50

Controlling or ignoring our thoughts during meditation is actually the opposite of mindfulness.

Whenever thoughts come into our head, and they do for everyone, we acknowledge the thought, and any emotions it evokes. Then we can say silently to ourselves, "thinking" and then let the thought go.

If the same thought keeps coming back, we can say silently ""I'm thinking the same thought" and then make the decision to let it go.

By making that decision to let the thoughts go every time they come back, we are releasing any power we may have felt the thought had over us.

Noticing that we are thinking and acknowledging the thoughts and emotions, IS being mindful.

2 questions

A quick check that you "get it"

21:04

This is lectures 1-5 brought together into one uninterrupted guided meditation-without the titles, explanations or advice. Just my voice as it guides you straight through an entire 20 minute meditation. And I've made it downloadable for you. Hope you enjoy!

10:01

Here's a quick meditation you can do any time that you have 10 minutes to spare, or in times of stress. You can do it sitting at your desk, sitting in your (stationary!) car before going into a meeting/interview or whatever, or just whenever you want to take 10 minutes out wherever you are. It's also good if you're having difficulty settling your mind. Moving your attention from your body to your breath to sounds and back to your body helps to interrupt the thoughts so you don't get emotionally caught up in them.

I've also included a downloadable MP3 version in the Resources section, so you have a choice of downloading either the video or audio, or both.

Give it a go and let me know what you think.

Section 2: Mindfulness in everyday situations
Welcome to Section 2
01:03
09:01

At the end of this lecture you will have some understanding of the technique of savouring and really enjoying your food. With parctice, you can begin to use this technique every time you eat, encouraging you to eat more slowly, which is good for your digestion.

Begin as always with 3 deep breaths. Allow your breathing to return to normal and observe its rhythm for a couple of minutes.

Hold the food in your hand for a moment and pay attention to how it feels.Does it have an odour? Does that odour evoke any emotions or memories?

Observe the first taste when you place it in your mouth. Again, observe any emotions and memories.

Continue observing texture and taste as you eat the food.

Take a few moments after swallowing to savour the sensations.

Bring your attention back the the room and to your body.

(Music for this meditation: Painting the Ocean by Robert Norton. Retrieved from www.meditation.org.au 2012 - The Meditation Society of Australia)

08:07

So many people say they don't have time to meditate. Well, you can practice mindfulness almost anywhere, including on public transport...

At the end of this lecture, you will be familiar with the technique of practicing mindfulness while on public transport.

Instead of closing your eyes, softly fix your gaze on an object in front of you and take 3 deep breaths. Then allow your breathing to return to normal and just passively observe it for a few moments.

Look around you and observe everything you can. Pay attention to colours, light and shadows, textures, sounds and odours. Use your imagination if you're not near enough to the object to touch or smell it.

You can continue this meditation for as long as you like or come back to it whenever you want.

When you have finished, become aware of the space immediately around you. Move your arms and legs and be aware of how your body feels right now.

(Music for this meditation: Painting the Ocean by Robert Norton. Retrieved from www.meditation.org.au 2012 - The Meditation Society of Australia)

13:08

Waiting in line can be boring at best, or nerve wracking at worst, depending on why you are waiting and whether or not you are in a hurry. Practicing mindfulness can ease both boredom and anxiety..

At the end of this lecture, you will be familiar with the technique of mindfulness while standing or sitting in line.

Without closing your eyes, but softly fixing you gaze on an object in front of you, take 3 deep breaths. Then allow your breathing to return to normal and just passively observe it for a few moments.

Bring your attention to your feet and notice how they feel.

Bring your attention to your hands and notice how they feel.

Notice the sounds around you.

Look around the room or area and notice everything you can.

You can continue this meditation for as long as is comfortable, or you can come back to it as often as you wish

When you are ready to finish, just take a moment to become aware of the space immediately around you. Move your arms and legs and observe how your body feels right now.

All pictures copyright of Anne Kelly

(Music for this meditation: Painting the Ocean by Robert Norton. Retrieved from www.meditation.org.au 2012 - The Meditation Society of Australia)

09:57

This is a meditation you can do when walking anywhere, alone or together with a companion.

At the end of this lecture, you will be familiar with the techniques of walking mindfully.

Begin as always by taking three deep breaths

Notice the rhythm of your steps and try, if possible, to match the rhythm of your breathing to them.

Keep looking forward while noticing the feeling of the ground under your feet.

Notice how your legs feel as you walk.

Notice your hands

Now observe the sights around you.

And the sounds

What odours do you notice?

You can continue this meditation for as long as is comfortable, or you can come back to it as often as you wish.

When you are ready to finish, just take a moment to become aware of the space immediately around you. Move your arms and legs and observe how your body feels right now.

All pictures copyright of Anne Kelly

(Music for this meditation: Distant sounds of the Sea by Jon Short of Deep Sky Divers (Published by Anyrobinhood) retrieved from www.meditation.org.au 2012 - The Meditation Society of Australia)

Section 3: Advanced Mindfulness Practices
Welcome to Section 3
00:33
10:41

By the end of this lecture you will have some understanding of the concept that our thoughts are not what we are, but rather are just a part of everyday living over which we do have some measure of control

Begin as always by taking 3 deep breaths

Bring your attention to the sounds outside and inside the room, and observe them passively, without judgement.

Try to imagine that you are the sky and the sounds are the clouds. As each sound drifts by, acknowledge it, as an observer and allow it to drift away.

Now bring attention to the thoughts, but without following them. Try to imagine that you are the sky and your thoughts are the clouds. As each thought drifts by, acknowledge it, as an observer and allow it to drift away.

If you find yourself getting drawn into each thought, acknowledge this and gently lead your attention back to simply observing.

Continue with this for as long as is comfortable

When you’re ready, become aware again of the sounds around you, where you are in the room, how your body feels.

Move your feet and hands

Rub your hands together and place them loosely over your eyes

Open your eyes and slowly take your hands away

Raise your eyes and look around the room

Pictures: Sky 1 Przemyslaw "BlueShade" Idzkiewicz {cc-by-sa-2.0} available from http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cirrus_over_Warsaw,_June_26,_2005.jpg

Sky 2 Michael Jastremski {cc-by-sa-2.0} available from http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cumulus_clouds_in_fair_weather.jpeg

Sky 3 Saperaud{cc-by-sa-2.0} available from http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sc_2.jpg

(Music for this meditation: Distant sounds of the Sea by Jon Short of Deep Sky Divers (Published by Anyrobinhood) retrieved from www.meditation.org.au 2012 - The Meditation Society of Australia)

07:44

Often when we are in pain we are tense and anxious. This increases the muscle tension in our body, leading to more pain and creating a vicious circle.

By acknowledging the pain and at the same time relaxing and releasing the tension, we can significantly reduce the pain.

This meditation has worked spectacularly well for some, quite good for others and not at all for some. I would be really interested to know how it worked for you.

16:17

This is a powerful mindfulness meditation for getting to know that inner self, the self that is always on your side, the self that is more than just the stuff you do, the emotions you feel or the thoughts that you think.

I've used the meditation in my classes in Dublin and it is always appreciated.

Just a note, I mention Archetypes in the meditation and have been asked what exactly that is. An Archetype is the typical vision that everyone has of a particular role, such as The Mother, The Hero, The Lover, and so on. This vision is usually influenced by the culture you live in, your own family vision and also your own experiences. According to Jung, the Archetypes live in the mind of the collective consciousness.

09:29

As always, begin with 3 deep breaths, then allow your breathing to return to normal and pay attention to its rhythm for a moment.

Now, bring to mind someone you feel very close to (it can be a person or a pet).

Hold them in your mind and feel the positive emotions they bring.

In your mind, bestow them with the following blessings (or you can use your own blessings):

May you be safe and healthy

May you love and be loved

May you be happy

May you understand and be understood by all, including yourself

May you have abundance and prosperity

Now bring your attention to someone whom you like (a work colleague, neighbour, etc for example) and bestow the same blessings on them

Bring your attention to someone you only vaguely know. (for example, the person who serves you in your local shop or store, a neighbour you only know to nod to as they pass by). Bestow the same blessings on this person.

Now, bring your attention to someone whose company you find challenging. Perhaps someone who has hurt you or made you angry, even in the past. Bestow on them the same blessings.

Now bestow the same blessings on yourself

Finally bestow the same blessings on every person in the world.

Bring your attention back to the room, where you are seated, the feel of your body and open your eyes when you are ready.

All photographs copyright Anne Kelly

(Music for this meditation: Distant sounds of the Sea by Jon Short of Deep Sky Divers (Published by Anyrobinhood) retrieved from www.meditation.org.au 2012 - The Meditation Society of Australia)

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00:45

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Instructor Biography

Anne Kelly, Tutor in Happiness and Mindfulness

I live and work in Dublin, Ireland as a Happiness Coach and a Tutor in Mindfulness Meditation and Mindfulness Living. I work with individuals on a one-to-one basis, and also with small groups of up to ten or twelve students.

I hold a First Class Honours Bachelor of Science degree in Applied Psychology. Added to that, I also hold qualifications in Tutoring, Learning & Instruction and Counselling. During my recent studies at university I researched countless articles on the best way to teach meditation, and also on Positive Psychology, including mindfulness and happiness studies.

On a personal basis, putting Positive Psychology into practice has made a big difference in my life and has seen be through many difficult times. It has also taught me to appreciate the good things in life and has contributed considerably to my overall happiness.

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