Microsoft Word 2013 Training Tutorial

Learn Introductory through Advanced material with this complete Word course. Video lessons & manuals included.
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  • Lectures 129
  • Length 11.5 hours
  • Skill Level All Levels
  • Languages English
  • Includes Lifetime access
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    Available on iOS and Android
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About This Course

Published 3/2013 English

Course Description

Learn Microsoft Word 2013 with this comprehensive course from TeachUcomp, Inc. Mastering Word Made Easy features 126 video lessons with over 7 hours of introductory through advanced instruction. Watch, listen and learn as your expert instructor guides you through each lesson step-by-step. During this media-rich learning experience, you will see each function performed just as if your instructor were there with you. Reinforce your learning with the text of our three printable classroom instruction manuals (Introductory, Intermediate and Advanced), additional images and practice exercises.  You will learn how to create basic documents, format text and images, create and use tables, templates, mail merges, macros and much more.

Whether you are completely new to Word or upgrading from an older version, this course will empower you with the knowledge and skills necessary to be a proficient user. We have incorporated years of classroom training experience and teaching techniques to develop an easy-to-use course that you can customize to meet your personal learning needs. Simply launch a video lesson or open one of the manuals and you’re on your way to mastering Word.

This course includes bonus lessons for versions prior to version 2013.

What are the requirements?

  • Word software recommended for practice.

What am I going to get from this course?

  • Video Lessons
  • Includes Three Classroom Instruction Manuals
  • Editing Skills
  • Formatting Skills
  • Printing Documents
  • Using Clip Art
  • Creating and Modifying Tables
  • Form Templates
  • Macros

What is the target audience?

  • Anyone wanting to learn Microsoft Word.

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee.

Forever yours.
Lifetime access.

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android.

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section 1: Getting Acquainted with Word
02:08
Microsoft Word is a word processing program that you can use to create various types of documents. You can create standard letters, memos, faxes, envelopes, labels, and many other types of documents. You can also create your own custom documents, as you have complete control over the appearance of your documents. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:57
If you are an experienced Word user, you will notice that the interface in Word 2013 is similar to the interface used in Word 2010. For new users of the program, as with any program, you should begin by familiarizing yourself with your working environment. You should start by learning the names and locations of the tools you will need to create Word documents. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:55
If you are an experienced Word user, you will notice that the interface in Word 2007 is vastly different than the interface in previous releases. So this time, unlike recent previous releases of this program, even veteran Word users will need to take some time to reacquaint themselves with the interface and the objects within it. For new users of the program, as with any program, you should begin by familiarizing yourself with your working environment. This is where we will begin exploring Word 2007. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:56
The Title Bar is the bar that runs across the top of the application window. The name of the document that you are working on will be displayed in the center of this bar. At the right end of the Title Bar is a button group. There are five buttons in this group in Word 2013 and three in Word 2010 and 2007. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:16
The primary tool that is available for you to use in Word is the Ribbon. This object allows you to perform all of the commands available in the program. The Ribbon is divided into tabs. Within these tabs are different groups of commands. The commands in each group can be accessed either through the use of buttons, boxes, or menus that are available within the group. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:17
Starting in Word 2010, the “File” tab within the Ribbon replaces the functionality of the older “Microsoft Office” button that appeared in Word 2007. You can click the “File” tab in the Ribbon to open a view of the file called the “Backstage View.” In this view, you can perform all of your file management. This includes performing functions such as saving your file, opening an existing file, or creating a new file. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:55
The Microsoft Office button gives you access to your basic file management functions within Word 2007. For upgrading users, you will find that this button replaces the functionality previously found under the “File” command in the old Menu Bar. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:04
The Quick Access toolbar is located above the Ribbon, by default. However, you can also place it below the Ribbon, if desired, by clicking the “Customize Quick Access Toolbar” button at the right end of the toolbar and then selecting the “Show Below the Ribbon” command. You can reset it to its default location by clicking the same “Customize Quick Access Toolbar” button and then choosing the “Show Above the Ribbon” command. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:34
Because of the increased use of tablets, Word 2013 has been redesigned with a new mode to allow for easier access to the buttons and other commands within the Ribbon and Quick Access toolbar. This mode is called touch mode. When you enter touch mode within the Word 2013 interface, the Ribbon and Quick Access toolbar are enlarged and extra space is added around the buttons and commands within the Ribbon and Quick Access toolbar so that you can more easily access them on your touch-based tablet. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:07
Microsoft Word provides you with a ruler that you can use to set tabs within a document and assist in the placement and positioning of document text and document objects. Depending upon which document view you are using, the ruler may appear differently. The ruler appears both horizontally and vertically in the “Print Layout” view, but only appears horizontally in the “Draft” view. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:54
The scroll bars can appear both vertically and horizontally along the right and bottom sides of your document window. They have arrows at the each end that point in the direction in which they will scroll the document when you click them. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:19
The document view buttons are a group of buttons located in the lower right corner of the application. They are also located in the Ribbon under the “View” tab. You can click these buttons to change the working view of your document. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:08
In the lower right corner of the application window, you can see the Zoom slider. You can use this to change the magnification level of the document. This does not modify the document in any way, but rather changes your perception of how close or far away the document appears onscreen. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:00
At the bottom of the application window is a long, thin, horizontal bar in which you find objects such as the “Zoom Slider” and the “Document Views” buttons. The bar within which these tools appear is called the Status Bar. Here you can see various statuses that are capable of being monitored in Word. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:31
Another feature in Microsoft Word is the Mini toolbar. When you select text within the document and hold your mouse pointer over it, you will see a small dimmed-out toolbar appear next to the selection. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:05
The changes to the visual interface that were implemented in Word 2007 changed the use of keyboard shortcuts within the application. First off, you should know that all of the “Ctrl” key keyboard shortcuts remain intact. So, for example, you can still enter shortcuts like “Ctrl” plus the “S” key to quickly save changes as you type. The major change has occurred in using the “Alt” key keyboard shortcuts. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 2: Creating Basic Documents
04:09
To open a document, you must first know where the document you want to open is located. When you initially open Word, you can see a listing of recently opened documents shown in the panel at the left side of the startup screen, under the “Recent” section. You can open one of these listed documents by clicking on its name within the panel to reopen it. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:37
In this lecture, we will explore the fundamental skills that you must acquire to create basic documents within the Word program. You will learn to create new documents, open previously created documents, save document changes, and then close those documents. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:30
In this lecture, we will explore the fundamental skills that you must acquire to create basic documents within the Word program. You will learn to create new documents, open previously created documents, save document changes, and then close those documents. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:43
If you have multiple documents open, then to close a document you can just click the “x” in the upper right corner of the application window to close the current document. Clicking the “x” is equivalent to executing the “Close” command. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:04
When you first open Word 2013, you will see a startup screen that allows you to create a new document. Simply click the type of document that you want to create within the listing of available templates that appears at the right side of the startup screen. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:49
To create a new document, click the Microsoft Office button and then select the “New” command. This will launch the “New Document” window. Here you can choose to start a new document from one of the many templates available, or you can choose to simply create a new blank document. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:37
When you save a document for the first time, you must use the “Save As” command so that you can choose where to save the file and what to name it. To do this, click the “File” tab within the Ribbon. Then click the “Save As” command in the command panel shown at the left side of the backstage view. To the right of the command panel, under the “Places” section, you will see the places that are available for you to save the file. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:47
After you have made any change to a document that you want to keep, you should save the document. Learning to save your work frequently is one of the most important computer skills you can have. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:41
After you have made any change to a document that you want to keep, you should save the document. Learning to save your work frequently is one of the most important computer skills you can have. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:10
A new feature in Word 2013 allows you to attempt to recover unsaved document files. If you want to see if Word has automatically saved a copy of an unsaved document that you were working on, then select the “File” tab within the Ribbon and click the “Open” command at the left side of the backstage view. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:08
When you open a new document, the insertion point cursor appears in the upper left corner of the document. This insertion point cursor identifies where any text that you type with your keyboard will appear. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:52
To move the insertion point cursor you must have characters on the page, even if they are non-printing (invisible) characters like the ones that the “Spacebar,” “Tab,” and “Enter” keys create when you press them. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:09
After you have learned how to enter text, you will next need to learn how to select it. When you select text, changes that you then make will only affect the selected text. This includes formatting, replacing, or deleting the selected text. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:02
In Word, the “Spacebar,” “Tab,” and “Enter” keys all create characters within your document- just like any other key on your keyboard does. Normally you cannot see these characters, but they can sometimes be problematic when they are accidentally selected. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:41
Word provides you with tools that assist you in managing your workspace when you have multiple documents open. In Word, you can have many documents open at a time in order to perform functions like copying and pasting text between them, for example. Learn this and more during this lecture.
04:13
Word 2013:2007 save their documents using a new file format that provides a smaller file size and better security than the format used in prior versions of Word. However, you should be aware of the file format issue if you will be sharing your document collaboratively with others who may need to use and edit the document with an older version of Word. Some features of Word 2013:2007 aren’t supported by older versions of Word. Also, if you save a Word 2013:2007 document using the new Word file format, it will not be able to be opened in previous versions of Word by default. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 3: Basic Editing Skills
01:07
In Word, you can delete characters, words, paragraphs, or all of the text in your document quickly and easily. You can use the “Backspace” and “Delete” keys on your keyboard to remove text while typing. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:42
When working with documents, you will often want to move or copy text, or other selected document elements, from one place to another. Word makes this frequent occurrence easy to manage through the use of the Clipboard feature. If you click the “Home” tab in the Ribbon, you will see the “Clipboard” group at the left end. In this group, you will see the “Cut,” “Copy,” and “Paste” command buttons that allow you to move or copy text in your document. Note that these same buttons are also used to move or copy other selectable document elements, like Clip Art, for example. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:33
The “Undo” command, located in the Quick Access toolbar by default, is one of the most useful functions ever created. It allows you to reverse the last command, or last few commands, that you performed. Learn this and more during this lecture.
04:38
You can use the commands in the “Editing” group on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon to execute several commands that can assist you in editing Word documents. You can use the functions in this section to quickly find and replace document content. This can be extremely useful for quickly revising standard documents that need minor, repetitive changes to the text. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 4: Basic Proofing Tools
03:09
Word provides you with a tool that helps you to quickly identify and correct misspelled words and grammatical errors in your documents. It is the “Spelling & Grammar” tool. As its name clearly states, this tool identifies and corrects both spelling and grammar errors in your document. Learn this and more during this lecture.
04:11
You can customize many features of the “Spelling & Grammar” tool. You can view the “Proofing” options for Microsoft Word by clicking the “Options…” button when using the “Spelling & Grammar” dialog box. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 5: Font Formatting
02:11
Formatting the font (or “text”) within your document can give your document a finished and polished appearance. You can add bolding or italics to emphasize selected text, change the color of the text, or add many other stylistic options. It is very easy to apply font formatting. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:44
Advanced font formatting options are available through use of the “Font” dialog box. You can access this dialog box by clicking the “Font” dialog box button in the lower right corner of the “Font” group in the “Home” tab of the Ribbon. In this dialog box there are two tabs- the “Font” tab and the “Advanced” tab. On the “Font” tab you can access many lesser-used text effects available. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:36
When you are formatting text, you may want to simply copy the formatting from one text selection and then paste only the formatting onto other text selections. This can save you a lot of time when formatting documents that have a standard appearance for many sections. Word provides you with the “Format Painter” button in the “Clipboard” group of the “Home” tab in the Ribbon. This button allows you to copy and paste the formatting, but not the content, from one selection of text to multiple other selections. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 6: Formatting Paragraphs
01:55
In Word, you have several choices on how you would like to align your paragraphs. Alignment refers to the appearance of the left and right sides of the paragraph. By default, Word aligns paragraphs to the left. You can change this alignment so that the right sides are symmetrical (right alignment), or that the lines are centered with even space on both sides (center alignment), or justified (both left and right sides are aligned). Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:37
With Word, you have many choices as to how you would like to add indentation to your documents. Hitting the “Tab” key on your keyboard will add a tab of a half-inch. You can also increase or decrease the indentation of the entire left side of your paragraphs by using the “Increase Indent” or “Decrease Indent” buttons located in the “Paragraph” group on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:03
Like most word processing programs, you can modify the line and paragraph spacing in your document. Line spacing is the amount of space allotted to go between each line in your paragraph. Paragraph spacing is the amount of space to be inserted before and after the paragraphs in your document. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 7: Setting Page Layout
03:08
When you create a document, you set a paper size such as 8.5” by 11.” When you reach the end of the specified page size in Word, it will insert an automatic page break. Sometimes these automatic page breaks occur in places where you would rather not have them occur. Learn this and more during this lecture.
05:35
All documents based on the “Normal” template contain space for header and footer information. In order to view and edit the content of the headers and footers while working in the document, however, you will need to be using the “Print Layout” view of the document. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:06
The “Page Setup” group on the “Page Layout” tab of the Ribbon contains buttons that allow you to make changes to the fundamental setup of the document. In addition to these buttons, you can also click the “Page Setup” dialog box button in the lower right corner of the “Page Setup” group to open the “Page Setup” dialog box. Here you can change any aspect of the document setup that you choose. This dialog box consists of three tabs: “Margins,” “Paper," and “Layout.” Let’s examine the aspects that you can set in this dialog box. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 8: Using Templates
03:46
A template is a “master” document, from which you create the copies of the documents that you actually work on. For example, when you create a new blank document in Word, it is actually a copy of the “Normal” template that is created anytime that you create a new standard document. Word provides you access to hundreds of document templates through Office Online. These are helpful to create quick forms that contain a different fundamental format than that of a standard blank document. There are templates for various styles of agendas, calendars, faxes, memos, blog postings, resumes, reports, and many other types of specialized documents. All you have to do is customize the template by editing the default content in order to quickly have a very professional-looking document! Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:09
A template is a “master” document, from which you create the copies of the documents that you actually work on. For example, when you create a new blank document in Word, it is actually a copy of the “Normal” template that is created anytime that you create a new standard document. Word provides you access to hundreds of document templates through Office Online. These are helpful to create quick forms that contain a different fundamental format than that of a standard blank document. There are templates for various styles of agendas, calendars, faxes, memos, blog postings, resumes, reports, and many other types of specialized documents. All you have to do is customize the template by editing the default content in order to quickly have a very professional-looking document! Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 9: Printing Documents
03:42
Before you print your documents, make sure that you have the document properly setup using the “Page Setup” dialog box. Once this is accomplished, you will want to check the way that your document will print without having to waste paper by actually printing several copies until it is correct. Word provides another view of your document called “Print Preview” to assist you in this. In print preview, you can see how your document will actually print on paper, according to the specifications that you’ve set in the “Page Setup” dialog box. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:43
Before you print your documents, you need to make sure that you have the document properly setup using the “Page Setup” dialog box. You will then want to review how your document will print without having to waste the paper by actually printing several copies until it is correct. Word provides another view of your document called “print preview” to assist you in this. Using print preview, you can see how your document will actually look when printed on paper, according to the specifications that you have set in the “Page Setup” dialog box. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:53
If you want to quickly print one copy of your entire document as is, click the Microsoft Office button, roll over the “Print” command, and then select the “Quick Print” option to the right. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 10: Helping Yourself
01:26
You can access the help in Word by clicking the “Microsoft Word Help” button. This will open the “Word Help” window. Notice that this window can be closed by simply clicking the “x” in the upper right corner of the window when you are finished using the help files. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 11: Working with Tabs
04:34
In this lecture, we will examine how to create tab stops in Word documents. This can be useful when creating an organized list in a Word document. For example, suppose that you had to create a document that listed the names of the people in your company and also in which department they worked. In this case, it may be helpful to create a document that contains two columns of information: one for the names of the people, and another for the names of the departments. Using tabs in your Word document can allow you to easily accomplish this type of task. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:37
In this lecture we will examine the use of the “Tabs” dialog box. In order to access this dialog box in Word 2013:2007, you must click the “Home” tab in the Ribbon, and then click the “Paragraph” dialog box button that is located in the lower right corner of the “Paragraph” group. This will open the “Paragraph” dialog box. In the lower left corner of the “Paragraph” dialog box is the “Tabs…” button. Click this button to open the “Tabs” dialog box. You can use this dialog box to set any and all attributes of the tabs for the currently selected section or line in your document. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 12: Using Clip Art
02:30
One of the most useful and fundamental functions of Word is the ability to add pictures into your documents to enhance their appearance. In Word 2013, you can now insert pictures from various online resources, including Office.com, your SkyDrive, and other online resources. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:56
One of the most useful and fundamental functions of Word is the ability to add clip art and other types of pictures into your documents in order to enhance their appearance. Clip art is provided with Word, but you can also add your own saved images or you can edit the properties of clip art that is provided in order to customize the clip art. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:09
You can also insert your own pictures that you have saved to your computer into your Word documents. For example, if you were creating a newsletter and you wanted to insert a picture from a recent meeting or event that you had saved to your computer, you could easily do that in Word. Learn this and more during this lecture.
11:29
Now we need to look at the tools that you can use to modify the pictures that you have inserted. Once you insert a picture and select it, the “Picture Tools” contextual tab appears in the Ribbon with the “Format” tab displayed. This tab contains the main functions that you can use to format selected pictures. Note that this contextual tab only appears if you have an image selected within your document. Learn this and more during this lecture.
07:22
Now we need to look at the tools that you can use to modify the Clip Art that you have inserted. Once you insert a picture, the “Picture Tools” contextual tab appears with the “Format” tab displayed. This tab contains the main functions that you can use to quickly and easily format the inserted pictures. Note that this context tab only appears when you have an image selected within your document. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:39
To make advanced changes to a selected image, you can use the “Format Picture” task pane within Word 2013 to control every aspect of your picture in detail. For upgrading users, you should note that the “Format Picture” task pane now replaces the “Format Picture” dialog box found in Word 2010:2007. Learn this and more during this lecture.
11:40
To change the fill color and line or border settings for a selected image, click the “Fill & Line” category icon within the “Format Picture” task pane to display the “Fill” and “Line” category groupings. You can click the “Fill” category grouping to expand it, if needed, and display the options that you have for setting a fill color for the selected image. To use these settings effectively with images, the selected image must contain a transparent section. Learn this and more during this lecture.
07:31
To apply or change the various visual effects settings for a selected image, click the “Effects” category icon within the “Format Picture” task pane to display the “Shadow,” “Reflection,” “Glow,” “Soft Edges,” “3-D Format,” “3-D Rotation,” and “Artistic Effects” category groupings. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:21
To apply or change the various layout and properties settings for a selected image, click the “Layout & Properties” category icon within the “Format Picture” task pane to display the “Text Box” and “Alt Text” category groupings. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:43
To control the clarity, brightness, and contrast of a selected picture, click the “Picture” category icon within the “Format Picture” task pane to display the “Picture Corrections,” “Picture Color,” and “Crop” category groupings. Learn this and more during this lecture.
20:12
To make advanced changes to a selected image, you can use the “Format Picture” dialog box to control every aspect of your clip art in minute detail. You can access the “Format Picture” dialog box by clicking the “Format Shape” button in the lower right corner of the “Picture Styles” group on the “Format” tab of the “Picture Tools” contextual tab. Learn this and more during this lecture.
14:28
To make advanced changes to the image, you can use the “Format Picture” dialog box to control every aspect of your clip art in minute detail. You can access this dialog box by clicking the “Format Picture (Shape)” button in the lower right corner of the “Picture Styles” group on the “Format” tab of the “Picture Tools” contextual tab. The options that you can change are grouped by category. You can see the categories shown in a list at the left side of this dialog box. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 13: Drawing Objects
03:43
Word allows you to insert various shapes into your document. For example, you could place a circle around important information in a document. If you use Word to create marketing fliers, newsletters, or other types of publications, you may want to insert various types of shapes to add visual interest to your documents. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:51
WordArt is text that is created and formatted as a shape. Therefore, when formatting WordArt, you can use the formatting techniques applied to standard text as well as techniques applied to shapes. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:03
Next we will examine how to insert and format WordArt. WordArt is text that is created and formatted as if it were a shape. Therefore, you can use many of the same formatting techniques and styles that you used when formatting shapes. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:33
A text box is simply a shape into which text can be inserted. Therefore, you can format a text box in the same way that you can format a shape. However, a text box also contains text that you can format in the same way that you can format any other text within your document. Learn this and more during this lecture.
10:20
Before you can apply formatting to a shape, you need to click it to select it. If selecting a text box or WordArt as a shape, ensure that you click on its border so that the border appears as a solid, not dashed, line. That indicates that the shape has been selected. Once the shape has been selected, you will see the “Format” tab of the “Drawing Tools” contextual tab appear in the Ribbon. This tab provides you with several formatting options for the selected shape. Learn this and more during this lecture.
11:41
As we saw in the last lesson of this chapter, when you draw an object, the object should appear as being already selected. However, if it is not selected, then you need to click it in order to select it prior to formatting the object. Once the shape has been selected, you will see the “Format” tab of the “Drawing Tools” contextual tab appear in the Ribbon. This tab provides you with several formatting options for the selected object. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:48
To make advanced changes to a selected shape, you can use the “Format Shape” task pane. You can access the “Format Shape” task pane by clicking the “Format Shape” launcher button in the lower right corner of the “Shape Styles” group on the “Format” tab of the “Drawing Tools” contextual tab. For upgrading users, note that the “Format Shape” task pane now replaces the older “Format Shape” dialog box found in Word 2010:2007. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:57
To make advanced changes to a selected shape, you can use the “Format Shape” dialog box to control every aspect of your shape in minute detail. You can access the “Format Shape” dialog box by clicking the “Format Shape” button in the lower right corner of the “Shape Styles” group on the “Format” tab of the “Drawing Tools” contextual tab. Learn this and more during this lecture.
07:06
Most of the time, you can easily format your shapes using the tools available on the “Drawing Tools” contextual tab. However, for advanced options, you may want to access the “Format AutoShape” dialog box. For upgrading users, you will find that this dialog box hasn’t changed very much. This is basically the “old” version of the “Format Pictures” dialog box. Unfortunately, while both dialog boxes function in much the same way- some places in Word 2007 use one version of this dialog box and other places still use this version. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 14: Using Building Blocks
07:23
Building blocks allow you to create reusable document content that you can save and then insert into your future documents when needed. For example, you could save your company’s logo and name as a custom building block that you could easily insert into your future documents without having to recreate all of the content and related formatting. The content that can be saved as a building block can range in complexity from simple text entries to more complex logos and watermarks. The building block content is saved into and organized by galleries. It is also worth noting that you can also save building blocks with your document templates for easy distribution. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 15: Bullets and Numbering
02:36
Word can automatically apply simple bullets and numbering to lists in your documents as you type. You can also type a list, select it, and then apply bullets or numbering. You can also change the appearance of the bullets and numbers that you use. Learn this and more during this lecture.
04:57
You can change the appearance of bullets and numbers that you apply. Word allows you to create your own custom library of bullets and numbering. Custom bullets and numbering you create will then appear within the drop-down menus of their respective buttons. That way, you can create them once and then reuse them as often as needed. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:10
Word can also apply a multilevel list format to a list in order to outline topics. This is the list style that you can use to easily create an agenda or other formal outlined paper. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:50
Word contains many of the standard multilevel list formats that you will need to create commonly used outlines and agendas. However, you can also modify the multilevel list styles within Word to create custom styles that you can use within your documents. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 16: Tables
01:43
A table is a structured layout of information containers arranged in vertical columns and horizontal rows. The individual containers are called “cells.” Cells are organized in vertical columns and horizontal rows. In this way, they create a storage grid. They are often used to store data, although Word can also use them to organize document elements by creating a structure for the document layout. Learn this and more during this lecture.
07:39
Tables can have many purposes in Word. You can use tables to manipulate data like a spreadsheet program, you can use them to simply store data, or you can use them to assist you in structuring the layout of content within a document. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:37
After creating a table, you need to learn how to select the table elements. You can select the entire table or the separate table elements, such as the “cells,” “columns,” and “rows.” Just as with text, once you have selected an element, you can then make changes that are applied only to the selected element. Learn this and more during this lecture.

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Instructor Biography

TeachUcomp, Inc., Quality Software Training

Founded in 2001, TeachUcomp, Inc. began as a licensed software training center in Holt, Michigan - providing instructor-led, classroom-style instruction in over 85 different classes, including Microsoft Office, QuickBooks, Peachtree and web design, teaching staff at organizations such as the American Red Cross, Public School Systems and the Small Business Association.

At TeachUcomp, Inc., we realize that small business software can be confusing, to say the least. However, finding quality training can be a challenge. TeachUcomp, Inc. has changed all that. As the industry leader in training small business software, TeachUcomp, Inc. has revolutionized computer training and will teach you the skills to become a powerful and proficient user.

In 2002, responding to the demand for high-quality training materials that provide more flexibility than classroom training, TeachUcomp, Inc. launched our first product - Mastering QuickBooks Made Easy. The enormous success of our first tutorial led to an ever-expanding product line. TeachUcomp, Inc. now proudly serves customers in over 80 different countries world-wide including individuals, small businesses, non-profits and many others. Clients include the Transportation Security Administration, NASA, Smithsonian Institution, University of Michigan, Merrill Lynch, Sprint, U.S. Army, Oracle Corporation, Hewlett-Packard and the U.S. Senate.

Our full-time staff of software training professionals have developed a product line that is the perfect solution for busy individuals. Our comprehensive tutorials cover all of the same material as our classroom trainings. Broken into individual lessons, you can target your training to meet your needs - choosing just the lessons you want (and having the option to watch them all if you like). Our tutorials are also incredibly easy to use.

You will listen and watch as our expert instructors walk you through each lesson step-by-step. Our tutorials also feature the same instruction manuals (in PDF) that our classroom students receive - and include practice exercises and keyboard shortcuts. You will see each function performed just as if the instructor were at your computer. After the lesson has finished, you then "toggle" into the application and practice what you've learned - making it the most effective interactive training solution to learn on your own.

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