Microsoft PowerPoint 2013 Training Tutorial

Learn PowerPoint
0.0 (0 ratings) Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a
course's star rating by considering a number of different factors
such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the
likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
19 students enrolled
$19
$20
5% off
Take This Course
  • Lectures 104
  • Length 9 hours
  • Skill Level All Levels
  • Languages English
  • Includes Lifetime access
    30 day money back guarantee!
    Available on iOS and Android
    Certificate of Completion
Wishlisted Wishlist

How taking a course works

Discover

Find online courses made by experts from around the world.

Learn

Take your courses with you and learn anywhere, anytime.

Master

Learn and practice real-world skills and achieve your goals.

About This Course

Published 3/2013 English

Course Description

Learn Microsoft PowerPoint 2013 with this comprehensive course from TeachUcomp, Inc. Mastering PowerPoint Made Easy features 102 video lessons with over 5.5 hours of introductory through advanced instruction. Watch, listen and learn as your expert instructor guides you through each lesson step-by-step. During this media-rich learning experience, you will see each function performed just as if your instructor were there with you. Reinforce your learning with the text of our two printable classroom instruction manuals (Introductory and Advanced), additional images and practice exercises.  You will learn introductory through advanced concepts - from creating simple yet elegant presentations to adding animation and video and customization.

Whether you are completely new to PowerPoint or upgrading from an older version, this course will empower you with the knowledge and skills necessary to be a proficient user. We have incorporated years of classroom training experience and teaching techniques to develop an easy-to-use course that you can customize to meet your personal learning needs. Simply launch a video lesson or open one of the manuals and you’re on your way to mastering PowerPoint.

This course includes bonus lessons for versions prior to 2013.

What are the requirements?

  • PowerPoint software recommended for practice.

What am I going to get from this course?

  • Video Lessons
  • Includes Two Classroom Instruction Manuals
  • Presentation Views
  • Text Tools
  • Using Clip Art
  • Adding Slide Transition Animation
  • Drawing Objects
  • Macros
  • Much More!

What is the target audience?

  • Anyone wanting to learn Microsoft PowerPoint.

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee.

Forever yours.
Lifetime access.

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android.

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section 1: Getting Acquainted with PowerPoint
03:48
The picture shown is the initial screen that is displayed when you create a new blank presentation in PowerPoint 2013. The view shown is called “Normal” view and is one of the many presentation views that are available in PowerPoint. It is the view in which you will perform most of your time constructing your presentation. A presentation is the default type of file in PowerPoint. Within the presentation file you create and modify individual slides. The slides within a presentation contain multiple text and graphic objects which create the contents displayed in the individual presentation slides. When you close a presentation, PowerPoint will prompt you to save unsaved changes in the presentation before closing. Learn this and more during this lecture.
04:22
A presentation is the default object in PowerPoint. Within the presentation you create and modify individual slides that will constitute the presentation. The slides within a presentation contain multiple text and graphic objects which create the contents displayed in the individual presentation slides. When you close a presentation, PowerPoint will prompt you to save unsaved changes in any open presentations that you were working on before closing. Learn this and more during this lecture.
04:22
The first thing that you should notice is that the PowerPoint screen consists of two windows: the application window, and the presentation window. A presentation is the default object in PowerPoint. The presentation window opens up inside the application window. The presentation window is where you create and modify the slides in your presentations. You may close the presentation window without closing the PowerPoint application. This allows you to open and close different presentations without having to restart the program. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:01
The Title Bar is the bar that runs across the top of the application window. The name of the presentation that you are working on will be displayed in the center of this bar. At the right end of the Title Bar is a button group. There are five buttons in this group in PowerPoint 2013 and three in PowerPoint 2010 and 2007. They are, from left to right, “Microsoft PowerPoint Help,” “Ribbon Display Options,” “Minimize,” “Maximize/Restore Down,” and “Close.” In PowerPoint 2010 and 2007, only the last three buttons mentioned are displayed. Other than the “Microsoft PowerPoint Help” button, these buttons affect the display of the application window. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:12
The main tool available for you to use in PowerPoint is the Ribbon. This object allows you to perform all of the commands available in the program. The Ribbon is divided into tabs. Within these tabs are different groups of commands. The commands in each group can be accessed either through the use of buttons, boxes, or menus that are available within the group. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:15
Starting in PowerPoint 2010, the “File” tab within the Ribbon replaces the functionality of the older “Microsoft Office” button that appeared in PowerPoint 2007. You can click the “File” tab in the Ribbon to open a view of the presentation called the “Backstage View.” In this view, you can perform all of your file management. This includes performing functions such as saving your file, opening an existing file, or creating a new file. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:55
The Microsoft Office button gives you access to your basic file management commands in PowerPoint 2007. For upgrading users, you will find that this button replaces the functionality previously found under the “File” command in the old Menu Bar. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:01
The Quick Access toolbar is located above the Ribbon, by default. It can be placed below the Ribbon if desired, by clicking the “Customize Quick Access Toolbar” button at the right end of the toolbar and then selecting the “Show Below the Ribbon” command. To reset its default location click, the same “Customize Quick Access Toolbar” button and then choose the “Show Above the Ribbon” command. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:21
Because of the increased use of tablets, PowerPoint 2013 has been redesigned with a new mode to allow for easier access to the buttons and other commands within the Ribbon and Quick Access toolbar. This mode is called touch mode. When you enter touch mode, the Ribbon and Quick Access toolbar are enlarged and extra space is added around the buttons and commands within the Ribbon and Quick Access toolbar so that you can more easily access them on your touch-based tablet. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:03
Depending upon your magnification level, scroll bars can appear both vertically and horizontally along the right and bottom sides of your presentation slide. They have arrows at the each end that point in the direction in which they will scroll the slide when you click them. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:59
When you are working on your presentation in PowerPoint, you will find that you are switching views of your presentation frequently. To change the view of your presentation, you can click the desired presentation view button in the lower right corner of the screen. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:49
In the lower right corner of the application window, you can see the new Zoom slider that is available in PowerPoint. You can use this to change the magnification level of the slides in your presentation. This does not modify the presentation in any way, but rather changes your perception of how close or far away the slides in your presentation appear onscreen. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:08
At the bottom of the application window is a long, thin, horizontal bar in which you find objects such as the “Zoom Slider” and the “Presentation Views.” The bar within which these tools appear is called the Status Bar. Here you can see various statuses monitored within PowerPoint, such as the magnification level and the current slide number and total count of slides. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:28
Another feature in Microsoft PowerPoint is the Mini toolbar. When you select text within the presentation and hold your mouse pointer over it, you will see a small dimmed-out toolbar appear next to the selection. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:46
The changes to the visual interface that were implemented in PowerPoint 2007 have also affected the use of keyboard shortcuts within the application. While many things have changed, many other things have stayed the same to assist users in the migration to PowerPoint from versions prior to 2007. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 2: Creating Basic Presentations
04:30
To open a presentation, you must first know where the presentation you want to open is located. When you initially open PowerPoint, you can see a listing of recently opened presentations shown in the panel at the left side of the startup screen, under the “Recent” section. You can open one of these listed presentations by clicking on its name within the panel to reopen it. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:45
In this section, we will explore the fundamental skills that you must acquire to create basic presentations within the PowerPoint program. You will learn to create new presentations, open previously created presentations, save presentation changes, and then close those presentations. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:58
In this section, we will explore the fundamental skills that you must acquire to create basic presentations within the PowerPoint program. You will learn to create new presentations, open previously created presentations, save presentation changes, and then close those presentations. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:47
If you have multiple presentations open, you may want to close one of them. To close a presentation you can click the “x” in the upper right corner of the application window to close the current presentation. Clicking the “x” is equivalent to executing the “Close” command. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:12
When you first open PowerPoint 2013, you will see a startup screen that allows you to create a new presentation. Simply click the type of presentation that you want to create within the listing of available templates that appears at the right side of the startup screen. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:53
To create a new presentation, click the Microsoft Office button and then select the “New” command. This will launch the “New Presentation” window. Here you can choose to start a new presentation from one of the many templates available, or you can choose to simply create a new blank presentation. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:55
When you save a presentation for the first time, you must use the “Save As” command so that you can choose where to save the file and what to name it. To do this, click the “File” tab within the Ribbon. Then click the “Save As” command in the command panel shown at the left side of the backstage view. To the right of the command panel, under the “Places” section, you will see the places that are available for you to save the file. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:39
After making any change to a presentation that you want to keep, you should save the presentation. Learning to save your work frequently is one of the most important computer skills you can have. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:35
After making any change to a presentation that you want to keep, you should save it. Learning to save your work frequently is one of the most important computer skills you can have. When you save a presentation for the first time, you must use the “Save As” dialog box. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:16
A new feature in PowerPoint 2013 allows you to attempt to recover unsaved presentation files. If you want to see if PowerPoint has automatically saved a copy of an unsaved presentation you were working on, select the “File” tab within the Ribbon and click the “Open” command at the left side of the backstage view. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:36
When you create a new presentation, PowerPoint gives you one default slide that contains a “Title Slide” layout. You can click into the placeholders shown in the title slide and type the text that you want to have appear as the title and subtitle of your presentation. When you want to add another slide to your presentation, you must then insert a new slide and also determine what placeholders will appear in the slide. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:14
If you aren’t happy with the layout of the placeholders in your slide, you can apply a new layout to the slide. When you apply a new slide layout, you determine what placeholders you will be placing on the slide. You can also reset your currently selected slide’s layout back to its default in order to reset its placeholders, if desired. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:23
PowerPoint 2013 has many different methods you can use to share your finished presentations with others. To share a presentation, click the “File” tab in the Ribbon and then select the “Share” command in the command panel at the left side of the Backstage View. In the middle section, you will see the various options that you have for sharing a completed presentation in the “Share” list. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:30
PowerPoint 2010 has many different delivery methods that you can use to package and send your finished presentations to others. You will find many of these methods shown in the “Save & Send” section of the Backstage View. Learn this and more during this lecture.
04:50
PowerPoint 2013:2007 save presentations using a file format that provides a smaller file size and better security than the format used in prior versions of PowerPoint. However, you should be aware of the file format if you will be sharing your presentation collaboratively with others who may need to use and edit the presentation with an older version of PowerPoint. Some features of PowerPoint 2013:2007 aren’t supported by older versions of PowerPoint. Also, if you save a PowerPoint 2013:2007 presentation using the new PowerPoint file format, it will not be able to be opened in previous versions of PowerPoint by default. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 3: Using Presentation Views
05:54
“Normal” view is the default view in PowerPoint. You can select this view by clicking the “Normal” button in the “Presentation Views” button group within the Status Bar. Alternately, you could click the “Normal” button in the “Presentation Views” group on the “View” tab in the Ribbon. In this view you can see much of your presentation content. This view contains many different panes of information you can use to make changes to your presentation’s content. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:20
“Slide Sorter” view allows you to view and sort the presentation slides. To select this view, click the “Slide Sorter” button in the “Presentation Views” button group in the Status Bar or click the “Slide Sorter” button in the “Presentation Views” button group on the “View” tab in the Ribbon. You use this view reorganize, insert, delete and copy the presentation slides. You can also use it to see the presentation’s visual flow. You can also add and preview slide transition animation here, as well. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:16
Notes Page View shows the current slide as a picture at the top of the page and a text box with the associated slide’s notes at the bottom of the page. You can enter notes into the bottom pane of the “Normal” view or enter notes directly into the text box in this view, if preferred. You can access this view by clicking the “Notes Page” button in the “Presentation Views” button group on the “View” tab in the Ribbon. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:01
You use Slide Show view to show the presentation or see how the presentation will appear when presented. You can start the presentation from the currently selected slide by clicking the “Slide Show” button in the Status Bar. The most important thing to remember about Slide Show View is that you will not see anything onscreen except the content of the slides themselves. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:35
Reading View, which started in PowerPoint 2010, allows you to view the content of a presentation as if it were being displayed in “Slide Show View,” but within the frame of the application window versus being displayed full screen. The options that you have for advancing through this view are almost identical to the options that you have when viewing the presentation in Slide Show View. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 4: Using Text
04:53
In this lecture, you will learn how to insert text into slide objects. In PowerPoint, you can add text to slide placeholders, text boxes, or shapes. Many times when creating presentation slides, you enter text into the text and title placeholders that are included as elements in the slide layout. However, you can also add additional text to text boxes or shapes that supplement or enhance the text placeholders in the slide. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:28
In this lecture, you will learn the basics of object manipulation. These techniques can be applied to shapes, text boxes, placeholders, clip art and many other types of selected objects. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:39
You can apply font formatting to a text-containing object when it is in “object” mode to apply formatting changes to all the text within it. You can also click into the text within the object to place the object into its “text edit” mode and then apply formatting to only the selected text. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:22
You can apply paragraph formatting to a text-containing object when it is in “Object” mode to apply your formatting changes to all the text within the object. Note that some paragraph formatting options, such as “Increase Indent” and “Decrease Indent,” will not be available in this mode. To display all paragraph options, click into the text within the object to place the object into “text edit” mode and then select only the paragraphs to format. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:18
You can customize bulleting or numbering on a per paragraph basis by first selecting the paragraphs in a text-containing object to change it or by selecting the entire object to change all bullets or numbering for all paragraphs within the object. After making your selection, you can apply custom bullets or numbering. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:43
To apply tabs to text, first ensure that the ruler is activated by checking the “Ruler” checkbox in the “Show” group on the “View” tab. The “Tab” button is located in the upper-left hand corner of the screen when editing text within a text-containing object in the “Normal” presentation view. The “Tab” button is a toggle button that switches between the four types of tabs each time that you click it. The available types of tabs are: “Left,” “Center,” “Right,” and “Decimal.“ Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:45
You can set the text options for a text box or placeholder by clicking either the “Text Direction” or “Align Text” drop-down buttons in the “Paragraph” button group on the “Home” tab of the Ribbon, and then clicking the “More Options…” command in either drop-down menu. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:16
You can set the text box options of a selected text-containing object in a few ways. One way to view these options is to click either the “Text Direction” or “Align Text” drop-down buttons in the “Paragraph” group on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon, and then clicking on the “More Options…” command in either drop-down menu. They will both open the “Format Text Effects” dialog box and display the “Text Box” category from the listing of formatting categories shown at the left side of the dialog box. At the right side you can set the properties of the text-containing object. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:05
PowerPoint gives you a spelling tool that can show you possible misspellings in slide text. You can click the “Spelling” button in the “Proofing” group on the “Review” tab in the Ribbon to open the “Spelling” dialog box to assist you in finding spelling errors in your presentation. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 5: Using Pictures
02:01
One of the most useful functions of PowerPoint is the ability to add pictures to your presentation to maximize its overall appearance. PowerPoint provides you with hundreds of images for enhancing your presentations from multiple providers such as Office.com. You can also import picture files that you have on your computer into PowerPoint. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:49
One of the most useful functions of PowerPoint is the ability to add pictures to your presentation slides to enhance their appearance. In PowerPoint 2013, you can now insert pictures from various online resources, including Office.com, your SkyDrive, and other online resources Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:39
One of the most useful functions of PowerPoint is the ability to add pictures to your presentation in order to maximize its overall appearance. PowerPoint provides you with hundreds of images you will find useful for enhancing your presentations. You can also import picture files that you have into PowerPoint. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:06
You can click a picture to select it. When a picture is selected, small white squares, called “resizing handles,” appear on its border. To resize your selected picture, place your mouse pointer over a resizing handle until your mouse pointer turns into a double-pointed arrow. At that point you can click and drag in the directions shown by the arrows to resize the picture in either direction, making the clip larger or smaller. Learn this and more during this lecture.
13:19
Now we need to look at the tools that you can use to modify the pictures that you have inserted. Once you insert a picture and select it, the “Picture Tools” contextual tab appears in the Ribbon with the “Format” tab displayed. This tab contains the main functions that you can use to format selected pictures. Note that this contextual tab only appears if you have an image selected within your presentation. Learn this and more during this lecture.
08:47
Now we need to look at the tools that you can use to modify the Clip Art that you have inserted. Once you insert a picture, the “Picture Tools” contextual tab appears with the “Format” tab displayed. This tab contains the main functions that you can use to quickly and easily format the inserted pictures. Note that this contextual tab only appears when you have an image selected within your presentation slide. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:40
To make advanced changes to a selected image, you can use the “Format Picture” task pane within PowerPoint 2013 to control every aspect of your picture in detail. For upgrading users, you should note that the “Format Picture” task pane now replaces the “Format Picture” dialog box found in PowerPoint 2010:2007. The options available are very similar, however, the task pane allows for greater freedom of movement and placement of the task pane when working with images in a presentation. Learn this and more during this lecture.
12:27
To change the fill color and line or border settings for a selected image, click the “Fill & Line” category icon within the “Format Picture” task pane to display the “Fill” and “Line” category groupings. You can click the “Fill” category grouping to expand it, if needed, and display the options that you have for setting a fill color for the selected image. To use these settings effectively with images, the selected image must contain a transparent section. Learn this and more during this lecture.
08:55
To apply or change the various visual effects settings for a selected image, click the “Effects” category icon within the “Format Picture” task pane to display the “Shadow,” “Reflection,” “Glow,” “Soft Edges,” “3-D Format,” “3-D Rotation,” and “Artistic Effects” category groupings. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:57
To apply or change the various size and properties settings for a selected image, click the “Size & Properties” category icon within the “Format Picture” task pane to display the “Size,” “Position,” “Text Box” and “Alt Text” category groupings. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:18
To control the clarity, brightness, and contrast of a selected picture, click the “Picture” category icon within the “Format Picture” task pane to display the “Picture Corrections,” “Picture Color,” and “Crop” category groupings. Learn this and more during this lecture.
21:38
To make advanced changes to a selected image, you can use the “Format Picture” dialog box to control every aspect of your clip art in minute detail. You can access the “Format Picture” dialog box by clicking the “Format Shape” button in the lower right corner of the “Picture Styles” group on the “Format” tab of the “Picture Tools” contextual tab. Learn this and more during this lecture.
16:33
To make advanced changes to the image, you can use the “Format Picture” dialog box to control every aspect of your clip art in minute detail. You can access this dialog box by clicking the “Format Picture (Shape)” button in the lower right corner of the “Picture Styles” group on the “Format” tab of the “Picture Tools” contextual tab. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 6: Using SmartArt
02:57
In PowerPoint, you can use SmartArt to easily incorporate charts and other types of diagrams into presentations without having to individually create all of the shapes and connectors between boxes in a flowchart or diagram. Learn this and more during this lecture.
06:31
Once you have selected a SmartArt graphic, you can use the commands found on the “Design” and “Format” tabs of the “SmartArt Tools” contextual tab within the Ribbon to make changes to your selected graphic. You will now learn about the functions found in these two tabs and how they can help you to change the layout and formatting of your SmartArt. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 7: Using Slide Show View
02:04
“Slide Show” view is used to display the presentation on or from your computer. You can view either the entire presentation, or just few a few slides. This is the best way to view your presentation for its clarity, flow, appearance, and impact on the audience. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:54
A custom show is a subset of slides within a larger presentation that you can define and then play as a mini-presentation. You can create a custom show within a larger presentation by first opening the presentation within which you want to define a subset of slides as a custom show. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 8: Printing Your Presentation
01:25
You can change the orientation and size of the slides within your presentation. You can click the “Slide Size” drop-down button in the “Customize” button group on the “Design” tab in the Ribbon to choose either a “Standard” or “Widescreen” aspect ratio. However, to use slides of a custom size or to change other aspects of your slides, you can select the “Custom Slide Size…” command in this button’s drop-down menu to open the “Slide Size” dialog box. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:39
You can change the layout and size of the slides in the “Page Setup” dialog box. To open this dialog box, click the “Page Setup” button in the “Page Setup” group on the “Design” tab in the Ribbon. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:08
You can determine what information appears in the header and footer of your slides by clicking the “Header & Footer” button in the “Text” group on the “Insert” tab in the Ribbon. On the “Slide” tab, you can select to include or exclude the date and time, the slide number, and the footer information. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:09
PowerPoint allows you to view presentation output in Print Preview. To do this, click the Microsoft Office Button, and then roll down to the “Print” command. Then click the “Print Preview” command in the side menu that appears. You’ll see your selected presentation slides in print preview. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:52
The “Print” dialog box allows you to set options for printing your presentation content. You can select which printer to use, what presentation objects you’d like to print (slides, speaker notes, etc.), what range you’d like to print (the first five slides, slides 10-12, etc.), the number of copies, and the color. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:41
Before you print your presentations, use “Print Preview” to see how your presentation will actually print on paper, prior to actually printing it. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 9: Helping Yourself
01:46
You can access the help in PowerPoint by clicking the “Microsoft PowerPoint Help” button. This will open the “PowerPoint Help” window. Notice that this window can be closed by simply clicking the “x” in the upper right corner of the window when you are finished using the help files. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 10: Applying Animation
03:51
With PowerPoint you can add slide transition animation to your presentation slides. Slide transition animation is the animation that occurs when you advance from slide to slide within the presentation. In PowerPoint you have many options to control slide transition effects. For example, you can often set the speed and direction of many transition animations. You can also add sound effects to complement the slide transition animation if desired. Learn this and more during this lecture.
05:50
To add animation to selected objects in presentation slides, use the “Animations” tab in the Ribbon. To animate a slide object, click the object in the slide to which you want to apply animation to select it. Then click the desired type of animation to apply to the selected object from the animations shown in the “Animation" button group on the “Animations” tab in the Ribbon. Learn this and more during this lecture.
04:03
With PowerPoint you can add slide transition animation to your presentation slides. Slide transition animation is the animation that occurs when you advance from slide to slide in the presentation. In PowerPoint you have many options to control your slide transition effects. Learn this and more during this lecture.
05:06
When you want to add animation to selected objects in your presentation slides, you do that through the “Custom Animation” task pane. However to apply a basic animation to a selected slide object you can click the “Animate:” drop-down in the “Animations" button group on the “Animations” tab in the Ribbon to select a style of animation for the selected object. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 11: Drawing Objects
03:21
PowerPoint allows you to insert various shapes into your slides. To insert a shape into a slide, click the “Insert” tab in the Ribbon and then click the “Shapes” button in the “Illustrations" button group. You can then view a drop-down menu of the shapes you can insert. Roll your mouse pointer over the shape you want to insert and then click it to select it. Learn this and more during this lecture.
11:38
Before you can apply formatting to a shape, you need to click it to select it. If selecting a text box or WordArt as a shape, ensure that you click its border so that the border appears as a solid, not dashed, line. That indicates that the shape itself has been selected in “object” mode. Once the shape has been selected, you will see the “Format” tab of the “Drawing Tools” contextual tab appear in the Ribbon. This tab provides you with several shape formatting options. Learn this and more during this lecture.
09:13
As we saw in the last lecture of this section, when you draw a shape, the shape should appear as being already selected. However, if it is not selected, then you need to click it to select it prior to formatting the shape. Once the shape has been selected, you will see the “Format” tab of the “Drawing Tools” contextual tab appear in the Ribbon. This tab provides you with several formatting options for the selected object. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:55
WordArt is text that is created and formatted as if it were a shape. So when formatting WordArt, you can use the formatting techniques applied to standard text as well as techniques applied to shapes. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:25
Next we will examine how to insert and format WordArt. WordArt is text that is created and formatted as if it were a shape. Therefore, you can use many of the same formatting techniques and styles that you used when formatting shapes and clip art. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 12: Inserting Video and Sound
05:03
You can insert video files into your presentation slides. You can create video files with several different types of software, and if you have a digital camcorder, you may even have software that allows you to save your movies as one of the files types accepted by PowerPoint. PowerPoint 2013 prefers “.mp4” videos encoded with H.264 video (a.k.a. MPEG-4 AVC) and AAC audio. It also accepts the “.asf,” “.avi,” “.wmv,” and “.mpeg” file types but can also use others, although you may have to embed them as objects. Learn this and more during this lecture.
04:51
You can insert video files into your presentation slides. For example, you could take training videos that you have created and insert them into the presentation. You can create movie files with several different types of software, and if you have a digital camcorder, you may even have software that allows you to save your movies as one of the files types accepted by PowerPoint. PowerPoint likes the “.avi,” “.wmv,” and “.mpeg” file types but can also use others, although you may have to embed them as objects. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:47
You can insert audio files into your presentation to add narration or sounds to your slides. Like videos, you can insert sounds from an online resource or you can insert them from audio files on your computer. PowerPoint 2013 can insert many types of audio files, such as MP4, MP3, WMA and WAV files. You can also record and insert a sound into a presentation, which we will learn how to do in a later lesson within this chapter. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:30
You can also insert audio files into your presentation to add narration or sounds to your slides. Just like movies, you can insert sounds from the Clip Organizer, or you can insert them from audio files on your computer. PowerPoint can insert MP3 and WAV files. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:55
If you want to edit the animation settings of an inserted audio or video file, you need to edit the playback of the file as part of the slide animation sequence. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:20
You can record your own audio files to insert into a PowerPoint presentation slide. To do this, you will need to have a microphone connected to or installed within your computer. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 13: Using Themes
02:44
In PowerPoint you can apply themes to your presentation slides to apply a consistent appearance to presentation elements. A theme applies a color scheme, a font scheme, and various effects to placeholders, shapes and other presentation objects. Learn this and more during this lecture.
04:00
In PowerPoint you can modify the color schemes and font schemes used by themes. You can then apply your own custom color schemes and font schemes to presentations. To create your own custom color scheme in PowerPoint 2013, click “More” button in the lower-right corner of the scrollable list of choices shown in the “Variants” button group on the “Design” tab in the Ribbon to display a drop-down menu of choices. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:32
You can create a custom font scheme to apply to the text in your presentation slides. To create your own custom font scheme in PowerPoint 2013, click “More” button in the lower-right corner of the scrollable list of choices shown in the “Variants” button group on the “Design” tab in the Ribbon to display a drop-down menu of choices. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:51
You can apply custom slide backgrounds to only selected presentation slides or to all slides. To apply a background style in PowerPoint 2013, click “More” button in the lower-right corner of the scrollable list of choices shown in the “Variants” button group on the “Design” tab in the Ribbon to display a drop-down menu of choices. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Students Who Viewed This Course Also Viewed

  • Loading
  • Loading
  • Loading

Instructor Biography

TeachUcomp, Inc., Quality Software Training

Founded in 2001, TeachUcomp, Inc. began as a licensed software training center in Holt, Michigan - providing instructor-led, classroom-style instruction in over 85 different classes, including Microsoft Office, QuickBooks, Peachtree and web design, teaching staff at organizations such as the American Red Cross, Public School Systems and the Small Business Association.

At TeachUcomp, Inc., we realize that small business software can be confusing, to say the least. However, finding quality training can be a challenge. TeachUcomp, Inc. has changed all that. As the industry leader in training small business software, TeachUcomp, Inc. has revolutionized computer training and will teach you the skills to become a powerful and proficient user.

In 2002, responding to the demand for high-quality training materials that provide more flexibility than classroom training, TeachUcomp, Inc. launched our first product - Mastering QuickBooks Made Easy. The enormous success of our first tutorial led to an ever-expanding product line. TeachUcomp, Inc. now proudly serves customers in over 80 different countries world-wide including individuals, small businesses, non-profits and many others. Clients include the Transportation Security Administration, NASA, Smithsonian Institution, University of Michigan, Merrill Lynch, Sprint, U.S. Army, Oracle Corporation, Hewlett-Packard and the U.S. Senate.

Our full-time staff of software training professionals have developed a product line that is the perfect solution for busy individuals. Our comprehensive tutorials cover all of the same material as our classroom trainings. Broken into individual lessons, you can target your training to meet your needs - choosing just the lessons you want (and having the option to watch them all if you like). Our tutorials are also incredibly easy to use.

You will listen and watch as our expert instructors walk you through each lesson step-by-step. Our tutorials also feature the same instruction manuals (in PDF) that our classroom students receive - and include practice exercises and keyboard shortcuts. You will see each function performed just as if the instructor were at your computer. After the lesson has finished, you then "toggle" into the application and practice what you've learned - making it the most effective interactive training solution to learn on your own.

Ready to start learning?
Take This Course