Microsoft Outlook 2013 Training Tutorial

Learn Microsoft's powerful email and scheduling program with this complete course.
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  • Lectures 94
  • Length 6 hours
  • Skill Level All Levels
  • Languages English
  • Includes Lifetime access
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    Available on iOS and Android
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About This Course

Published 4/2013 English

Course Description

Learn Microsoft Outlook 2013 & 2010 with this comprehensive course from TeachUcomp, Inc. Mastering Outlook Made Easy features 91 video lessons with over 4 hours of introductory through advanced instruction. Watch, listen and learn as your expert instructor guides you through each lesson step-by-step. During this media-rich learning experience, you will see each function performed just as if your instructor were there with you. Reinforce your learning with the text of our two printable classroom instruction manuals (Introductory and Advanced), additional images and practice exercises.  You will learn all about email, tasks, effective use of the journal and calendar, advanced mailbox options and much more.

Whether you are completely new to Outlook or upgrading from an older version, this course will empower you with the knowledge and skills necessary to be a proficient user. We have incorporated years of classroom training experience and teaching techniques to develop an easy-to-use course that you can customize to meet your personal learning needs. Simply launch a video lesson or open one of the manuals and you’re on your way to mastering Outlook. This course also includes bonus lessons for versions prior to 2010, making an upgrade from earlier versions a breeze.

What are the requirements?

  • Microsoft Outlook software helpful for practice.

What am I going to get from this course?

  • Video Lessons
  • Includes Two Classroom Instruction Manuals
  • Contacts
  • E-Mail
  • Using the Calendar
  • Tasks
  • Advanced Mailbox Options
  • Delegates
  • Much More!

What is the target audience?

  • Anyone wanting to learn Microsoft Outlook.

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee.

Forever yours.
Lifetime access.

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android.

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section 1: Getting Acquainted with Outlook
01:58
Welcome to the Outlook 2013 environment. The layout of the elements within the Outlook 2013 program has been streamlined and simplified so that the program will be intuitive and easy to use whether you are new to Outlook or simply upgrading from a previous version. Outlook incorporates an easy-to-use Ribbon at the top of the application environment that allows you to perform the tasks within the various sections of the program. The first step in learning how to use Outlook is to familiarize yourself with the names, locations, and functions of the elements that appear within the Outlook screen. The lectures within this section will describe these elements so that you can acquaint yourself with the Outlook environment. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:20
Welcome to the Outlook 2010 environment. You’ll find the layout of the Outlook program to be both intuitive and easy to use whether you are new to Outlook, or simply upgrading from a previous version. Like the rest of the Microsoft Office products, Outlook incorporates an easy-to-use Ribbon that allows you to perform many of the tasks within the application environment. Let’s begin learning how to use Outlook by first familiarizing ourselves with the placement of the objects in the Outlook screen, what they are called, and their purpose in the program. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:02
Welcome to the Outlook 2007 environment. You’ll find the layout of the Outlook program to be both intuitive and easy to use whether you are new to Outlook, or simply upgrading from a previous version. Many traditional Microsoft items are still available to use in Outlook 2007, like the Menu Bar, but there are also new items that we can use to navigate the application, like the new Ribbon that appears in message windows. Let’s begin learning how to use Outlook by first familiarizing ourselves with the placement of the objects in the Outlook screen, what they are called, and their purpose in the program. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:38
The Title Bar is the bar that runs across the very top of the screen. The Outlook icon appears at the left end. If you click this icon it will display a drop-down list of menu commands. These menu commands control the sizing of the application window. Your options are: “Restore,” “Move,” “Size,” “Minimize,” “Maximize,” and “Close.” Some of the options may appear to be a faded gray color. That means that those commands are not currently available to execute while the application is in its current state. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:15
Below the Title Bar in Outlook 2007 is the Menu Bar. You can control all of the functions of Outlook by selecting the different drop-down menu commands listed on the Menu Bar. In Outlook, these commands are: “File,” “Edit,” “View,” “Go,” “Tools,” “Actions,” and “Help.” Clicking on any one of these commands will display a sub-menu of available commands. Commands that appear in gray are not currently available. Commands that are followed by a right-pointing arrow will display another side menu of choices from which you will need to make a selection. Commands that are followed by ellipsis marks (…) will invoke a dialog box. In the dialog box, you will need to supply Outlook with some additional information or make some additional choices before it can carry out your command. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:34
The application toolbars in Outlook are located by selecting “View| Toolbars” from the Menu Bar. If you select these two commands in sequence, you’ll see a side menu of application toolbars that you can show or hide. Toolbars that have a check mark next to their name in this menu listing are currently being shown in the application. You can click on any toolbar in this list to toggle its display on or off. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:05
The Standard toolbar contains many standard command options. Clicking any of these buttons will perform their respective function. Also, notice that some buttons have small drop-down arrows to their right. If you click this little arrow, it will show a menu of choices that you can then click to select. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:19
Starting in Outlook 2010, you use the Ribbon to perform tasks on the items and folders within all areas of the Outlook program. The only time that you will see the Ribbon if you are using Outlook 2007 is when you open or create a new Outlook 2007 item, such as a mail message, task, or appointment. When you do that in Outlook 2007, then the item will appear in a separate window that contains a Ribbon at the top for item command access. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:33
The Microsoft Office button, which appears in the upper-left corner of any Outlook item window, gives you access to your basic item management commands within the item windows in Outlook 2007. For upgrading users, you will find that this button replaces the functionality previously found under the “File” command in the old item window’s Menu Bar. When you click this button, you will see a panel of commands appear. At the left side of the panel is a listing the most basic and fundamental item management commands. You can find commands that let you create a new item, send the item, save, delete, and move the item, view it properties, and close the item. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:48
You will see the Quick Access toolbar above the Ribbon, by default. While not shown in the main Outlook window in Outlook 2007, this toolbar is available for use in all item windows in Outlook 2007. You can easily add buttons to this toolbar for the functions that you use most. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:44
Because of the increased use of tablets, Outlook 2013 has been redesigned with a new mode to allow for easier access to the buttons and other commands within the Ribbon and Quick Access toolbar. This mode is called touch mode. When you enter touch mode within the Outlook 2013 interface, the Ribbon and Quick Access toolbar are enlarged and extra space is added around the buttons and commands within the Ribbon and Quick Access toolbar so that you can more easily access them on your touch-based tablet. Learn this and more during this lecture.
04:58
In Outlook, you can navigate to the folders in your account and display their contents using the Navigation Bar. The Navigation Bar in Outlook 2013 was previously called the Navigation Pane in older versions of Outlook. In Outlook 2013, the Navigation Bar appears at the bottom of the Outlook window and displays the categories of Outlook items, such as “Mail,” “Calendar” and “People, for example. When you click on a category button, the items within that category will then display in a Folder Pane at the far left side of the Outlook window. In Outlook  2013, you cannot change the display of the Navigation Bar, but you can set the display of the Folder Pane. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 2: Making Contacts
02:30
A contact is someone important to your business or personal life that you want to keep in contact with using Outlook. The “Contacts” folder in Outlook is basically the same as an electronic Rolodex, or address book. You use it to keep information about your business and personal contacts. It helps store and organize information about people that are important to you. Once you have entered the information details of a contact, such as their address, company, phone number, and e-mail address, Outlook will then be able to assist you in sending these people e-mail, making phone calls, and generating letters to the contact. Learn this and more during this lecture.
13:16
You can change the way that the information in the Contacts folder is viewed. If using Outlook 2013, you can click the “Change View” drop-down button within the “Current View” button group on the “View” tab of the Ribbon when viewing the “Contacts” folder, and then select the name of the view that you want to use from the drop-down menu that appears. In Outlook 2010, you can click the “Home” tab in the Ribbon when viewing the “Contacts” folder and then select a view from the “Current View” group. In Outlook 2007, you select “View| Current View” from the Menu Bar to display a listing of the many views of the Contacts folder. You can then select whichever listed view you feel is most beneficial to you. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:36
To add a new contact to the Contacts folder, you must first open the Contacts folder. Then click the “New Contact” button in the “New” group on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon in Outlook 2013:2010 or within the Standard toolbar in Outlook 2007. In all versions, you can also simply double-click in the blank space inside the Contacts folder pane. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:55
You can select a single contact when viewing the Contacts folder by simply giving a single click to the contact’s entry. That will select the contact in the view. You’ll notice the entry become highlighted to indicate that it is selected. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:31
You can print your contact information in Outlook. You can print only selected contacts or the entire Contacts folder. If you want to print only specific contacts, you’ll need to select the contacts to print by selecting them within the “Contacts” folder first. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:50
You can create a contact group within your Contacts folder that you can select in order to email several contacts at once. In Outlook 2007, this item is called a “distribution list.” They are handy for sending emails to a selected group of people in your Contacts folder. Therefore, before you can create the contact group, you’ll need to have the individuals listed in the Contacts folder with valid email addresses. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:36
You can associate contacts with a specific category to help you in sorting and searching for your contacts when your contact folder becomes cluttered with several contacts. To do this, you will need to select the contact or contacts that you would like to categorize by color within the “Contacts” folder. Then click the “Categorize” button in the “Tags” button group (“Options” group in 2007) on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon. You can then select a color category from the listing shown in the drop-down menu that appears. Note that you can click the “All Categories…” button in this drop-down menu to access the “Color Categories” dialog box. Here you can create, edit, and delete the categories themselves. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:55
After you have multiple entries in your contacts folder you may find that it is becoming increasingly difficult to locate your contacts. In this case, you can use the “Search” feature of Outlook to speed up finding your contacts. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:25
In order to benefit from this feature, you should have the ability to make phone calls through your computer. This may require a modem and additional assistance from your IT department to configure the phone calls. However, assuming you have the ability to place phone calls from your PC, Outlook gives you the ability to call your contacts using any of the phone numbers that you entered when you created the contact’s record in the “Contact” window. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:01
If you want to use the internet to look up the address of a contact, you must first make sure that you have entered a mailing address for the contact and that your computer is connected to the internet. If this is true, then you can first open the “Contacts” folder and then open the “Contact” window of the contact whose address you want to map. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 3: E-mail
05:33
E-mail allows you to communicate with people within your organization and around the world if you are connected to the Internet. E-mail also provides a convenient way of sending information to people in different time zones, as there is no need to worry about the time difference. The person will receive your message when they log into their e-mail account. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:20
You can switch the view of your Inbox to better organize your e-mail. If you wish to change the view, first open the Inbox folder. If using Outlook 2013:2010, click the “View” tab in the Ribbon and then click the “Change View” button in the “Current View” group. If using Outlook 2007, select “View| Current View” from the Menu Bar. In both versions, you can then select the name of any of the views listed in the menu that appears to apply them to your inbox. Learn this and more during this lecture.
04:18
Flagging a message for yourself will create a “To-Do” item that reminds you to follow up the message. Once it has been completed, you can then mark the task as completed and clear the flag. When you flag a message, Outlook will place a little flag next to the messages that require some type of follow-up, and will specify any action required to complete the follow-up. These can be a handy way to indicate messages that will need to be “followed up” with some type of other task. You can flag both messages that you send to others and you can also flag messages that you receive. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:52
After you have multiple messages in your “Inbox” folder, you may find that it is becoming increasingly difficult to locate specific messages. In this case, you can use the “Instant Search” feature of Outlook to speed up finding your messages. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:19
When you want to send an e-mail message to someone, you can do it from your Inbox folder. To do this, first open the “Inbox” folder. If using Outlook 2013:2010, click the “New Email” button in the “New” group on the “Home” tab of the Ribbon. If using Outlook 2007, click the “New Mail Message” button in the Standard toolbar. In either version, you can also press “Ctrl”+“N” on your keyboard. Doing any one of these actions will create a new blank message and display it in a new “Message” window. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:29
You should check for spelling errors in your e-mail before you send it. To spell check a message prior to sending it, click into the message text area that you want to spell check. If using Outlook 2013:2010, click the “Spelling & Grammar” button in the “Proofing” group on the “Review” tab in the Ribbon. If using Outlook 2007, click the “Spelling” button in the “Proofing” group on the “Message” tab in the Ribbon. This will begin the spell checker for the body of the message. The spell checker will work from the top of your message to the bottom, stopping at words that it thinks are misspelled. When this occurs, the “Spelling” dialog box will appear, giving you options to fix or ignore the words that it thinks are misspelled. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:45
In the “Message” window, you can click the “Options” tab in the Ribbon and then click the dialog box launcher button in the lower right corner of the “More Options” group to open the “Properties” dialog box (“Message Options” dialog box in 2007). You can change the settings of the individual e-mail that you will send here prior to sending the e-mail. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:50
You can click the “Format Text” tab in the Ribbon of any message windows when you are creating an e-mail to apply formatting to the text within the e-mail message. You can then select the text that you want to change and then apply the formatting, or you can set up font formatting prior to typing the letter. This will allow the text that you create to already have the selected font formatting selected. It is important to note that if the recipient of the e-mail doesn’t use HTML formatting, the formatting you’ve applied may not appear when they read the e-mail. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:44
You can create signatures and insert them into your e-mail. To do this, click the “Insert” tab in the Ribbon of the “Message” window when you are creating a new e-mail. If you have already created a signature, you can insert it by clicking the “Signature” button in the “Include” group. Then select the name of the signature file to insert from the drop-down menu. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:38
When you want to reply to a message that you have received, you will need to select the message that you want to reply to from the Inbox folder. If using Outlook 2013:2010, click the “Reply” button in the “Respond” group on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon. If using Outlook 2007, click the “Reply” button on the Standard toolbar. In Outlook 2013, you can then edit the reply in the Reading Pane at the right side of the Inbox. In Outlook 2010:2007, a “Message” dialog box will open, with the sender’s name in the “To:” field, the word “RE:” and the original subject you are replying to in the “Subject:” line, and then the text from the original message in the text box. Type your reply above the text of the original message and then click the “Send” button to send the reply back to the sender. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:19
When you forward a message, you are actually sending a copy of the message that you received to another recipient. First, you will need to select the message that you want to forward from the Inbox folder. If using Outlook 2013:2010, click the “Forward” button in the “Respond” group on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon. If using Outlook 2007, click the “Forward” button on the Standard toolbar. In Outlook 2013, the forwarded message will appear in the Reading Pane at the right side of the Inbox folder. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:34
Sometimes you will need to send a person a file that isn’t a message. Any time that you want to send a person an electronic copy of a file, you must send it as an attachment. For example, if you had to send a copy of your budget to your manager, you could simply insert a copy of the workbook into the message as an attachment. Assuming that the manager also had the software necessary to read your spreadsheet file, they would then receive the file and open it to view the information that you sent. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:44
You should never open attachments you have received from e-mail addresses that you do not know. Attachments can contain computer viruses. Outlook helps to prevent viruses from destroying your computer by removing any possibly suspicious attachments from the e-mail. However, having an e-mail antivirus scanning software scan all e-mail and attachments is also recommended. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 4: The Sent Items Folder
00:46
You can view the contents of your Sent Items folder by clicking the “Mail” button in the Navigation Bar, and then selecting the “Sent Items” folder in the Folder Pane. The Sent Items folder contains copies of the messages that you have sent. You can view, sort and print messages in the Sent Items folder the same way that you would in your Inbox. It is also useful for resending lost messages. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:59
In order to resend a message, you will need to display the Sent Items folder. In this folder, just double-click on the message that you want to resend to open it in its own “Message” window. If using Outlook 2013:2010, you then click the “Actions” button in the “Move” group on the “Message” tab in the Ribbon. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:54
Once in a while you send a message to someone, and then for whatever reason you wish to delete it or delete it and replace it with another message. Outlook provides this capability through the Sent Items folder. This function will only work, however, if the recipient of the e-mail hasn’t opened the message yet. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 5: The Outbox Folder
01:01
The Outbox is the temporary storage place of e-mails that are waiting to be sent to recipients. You can view, sort, and print messages in exactly the same way as you would for the Inbox. If you have a computer that is not connected to the Internet, then when you click the “Send” button to send e-mail, it will instead go to the “Outbox” until you are connected to the Internet. Later, Outlook will send the saved message when you click the “Send and Receive” button in Outlook. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 6: Using the Calendar
00:54
The Calendar folder stores all of the information that you would expect to find in a conventional paper-based calendar. The calendar allows for three basic types of entries: “Appointments,” which are events that you have allocated time for, but do not involve other people- for example, going to the doctor’s office; “Events,” which are activities that run for at least one day- for example, a birthday; and “Meetings,” which are appointments that require the presence of other people. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:01
When viewing the Calendar, you can easily switch the view displayed. In Outlook 2013:2010, you can click the buttons that appear within the “Arrange” group on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon to switch between the available views of your Calendar folder. They are “Day,” “Work Week,” “Week,” “Month,” and “Schedule View.” Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:04
To open the calendar and display a specific date using the Date Navigator, open the Calendar folder. Then use the “Previous Month” and “Next Month” arrows in the “Date Navigator” to move through the months until the date that you want to select appears. You could also click on the month heading itself that appears in the Date Navigator to select from either the three previous months or three next months which appear in a pop-up menu. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:10
You can set three types of items in your calendar. The items you can create are: “Appointments,” “Events,” and “Meetings.” The only difference between an “appointment” and an “event” is that an event lasts for a full day, while an appointment usually does not. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:41
In your calendar you will need to be able to select the different calendar items, such as appointments and meetings, to delete and edit them. In Outlook, you can select an object by simply clicking on it in the Calendar folder. You can then simply press the “Delete” or “Del” key on your keyboard to delete the selected object. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:58
To schedule an appointment in Outlook, open the Calendar folder and click either the “New Appointment” button in the “New” group on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon if using Outlook 2013:2010, or click the “New” button in the Standard toolbar if using Outlook 2007. The “Appointment” window will then open. Start by typing a description of the appointment into the “Subject:” text box. Then enter the location of the appointment into the “Location:” text box. Learn this and more during this lecture.
04:37
Outlook can also assist you in planning a meeting by sending out invitations to attendees. These are called “Meeting Requests.” The recipients of your meeting request will receive an e-mail message in which they must click a button that indicates if they will be attending. The response that they send is then recorded and stored by Outlook. In the future you can open the meeting request in your Calendar to view their responses. Learn this and more during this lecture.
04:10
Outlook can also assist you in planning a meeting by sending out invitations to attendees. These are called “Meeting Requests.” The recipients of your meeting request will receive an e-mail message in which they must click a button that indicates if they will be attending. The response that they send is then recorded and stored by Outlook. In the future you can open the meeting request in your Calendar to view their responses. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:48
If you are the person who created the meeting, you can check to see the attendance status of the invited attendees of that meeting. Since you are the meeting organizer, you will have the meeting automatically placed in your Calendar. You can go here to check the status of the attendees by double-clicking on the meeting in your calendar to display the Meeting window. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:46
Inevitably, your presence will be requested in a meeting. When you receive a “Meeting Request,” it is important to know how to respond to it. When you receive meeting requests, they will actually appear in your “Inbox” folder as a meeting request. Here you will double-click on the meeting request to open it, and then decide to click one of the buttons that appears in the toolbar at the top of the “Meeting Request” window: “Accept,” “Tentative,” “Decline,” or if allowed by the meeting organizer, “Propose New Time.” Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:42
If you want to schedule an event, open the Calendar folder. If using Outlook 2013:2010, click the “New Items” button in the “New” group on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon. Then select the “All Day Event” command from the button’s drop-down menu. If using Outlook 2007, select “Actions| New All Day Event” from the Menu Bar. The “Event” window will appear. Here you can enter the details of the event. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:26
Anytime that you are scheduling an appointment, event, or meeting, you have the option of setting a pattern of recurrence for the selected item. You can also set recurrence for your tasks that you create for yourself and others, as well. To set recurrence, simply click the “Recurrence” button in the “Options” group on the tab that shows the item’s type within the Ribbon of the item window. That will launch the “Recurrence” dialog box. Here you can set the time for the item and its recurrence pattern. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:51
To print a copy of your calendar, open the Calendar folder. If using Outlook 2013:2010, click the “File” tab in the Ribbon and then click the “Print” command at the left side of the backstage view shown. You can then click the “Print Options…” button that appears to the right. If using Outlook 2007, click the “Print” button in the Standard toolbar. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 7: Tasks
02:14
The Tasks folder helps you to organize and manage your workload. It keeps track of any tasks you have to complete and reminds you when they are due. You can also use Tasks to assign work to colleagues. In this lecture we will explore how we can use this feature to assign tasks to ourselves and others to manage our workload. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:36
To print a copy of your task list, open the Tasks folder. If using Outlook 2013:2010, click the “File” tab in the Ribbon and then click the “Print” command at the left side of the backstage view shown. You can then click the “Print Options” button that appears to the right. If using Outlook 2007, click the “Print” button in the Standard toolbar. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:59
To add a new task to your task list in the “Tasks” folder, click the “New Task” button in the “New” button group on the “Home” tab of the Ribbon in Outlook 2013:2010, or in the Standard toolbar in Outlook 2007. In either version, you could also double-click in any empty row in the task list to open the Task window. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:31
If the task you are creating is one that you repeat at regular intervals, you can set the recurrence as you create the task. That way when you have completed the task, it will automatically regenerate itself for the next date so that you do not have to worry about re-scheduling the task again every time you need to do it. Once it is marked as completed in your “Tasks” folder, the next occurrence of the task that you will need to accomplish will insert itself into your task list. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:20
Outlook allows you to assign tasks to other people to complete. This is the feature that you will probably need to master if you are in charge of overseeing a project or a department. You create a task request in much the same way that you create a task for yourself. If using Outlook 2013:2010, click the “New Items” drop-down button in the “New” group on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon and then select the “Task Request” command from the drop-down menu that appears. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:27
When you receive a task request, it will appear in your “Inbox” folder. You can double-click it to view the task, and then you must click one of the buttons in the top of the “Task request” window to let the person who is assigning the task know whether you have accepted or declined the task. You do have a few options. You can either: accept the task; accept the task with commentary; decline the task; decline the task with commentary; or reassign the task to someone else. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:59
If you are the “owner” of the task and it is your responsibility to complete the task, you can send an update report to others. Whenever you complete the task and change the “Status” of the task to “Completed” or enter in a “100 % complete” figure, the people on the update list will be automatically notified. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:14
You can simply click on a task that you want to delete in the “Task” folder, and then press the “Delete” or “Del” key on your keyboard to delete the selected task. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 8: Deleted Items
00:26
The “Deleted Items” folder stores all deleted items from other Outlook folders. Items that are in this folder have to be either permanently removed or restored to their original locations. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:41
To permanently remove items from the “Deleted Items” folder, open the “Deleted Items” folder and make sure that there aren’t any items in this folder that you want to keep. If there aren’t, then click the “Empty Folder” button in the “Clean Up” group on the “Folder” tab in the Ribbon if using Outlook 2013:2010, or select “Tools| Empty “Deleted Items” Folder” from the Menu Bar if using Outlook 2007. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:46
If you want to recover anything that was accidentally deleted from your other Outlook folders, you will need to select the appropriate objects to restore from the “Deleted Items” folder by clicking to select them. You can make multiple selections by holding down the “Ctrl” key and clicking on all of the items that you want to restore to the same folder. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 9: The Journal Folder
02:26
The Journal feature of Outlook can be used to record multiple types of interactions. You can record interactions with important contacts, when documents or items are created and accessed, or many other types of activities. In Outlook 2010:2007, you can configure the Journal to record these items and activities manually or automatically. Starting in Outlook 2013, you may only record activities manually, as automatic journaling is now always disabled. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:58
The Journal can be viewed in many different ways. To switch the Journal view in Outlook 2013:2010, you can click one of the view icons shown in the “Current View” group on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon when viewing the Journal folder. To switch the view of the Journal in Outlook 2007, you can select “View| Current View” from the Menu Bar, and then select the name of a view that you wish to see from the side menu of view choices that appears. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:04
If you click “Yes” to enable the Journal when you first switch to the Journal view, you can then instantly configure what items to track automatically in the “Journal Options” dialog box. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:17
You can also manually create a Journal entry. To do this in Outlook 2013:2010, click the “Journal Entry” button in the “New” group on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon when viewing the Journal folder. To do this in Outlook 2007, select “File| New| Journal Entry…” from the Menu Bar. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:52
You can open journal entries that you have recorded in the Journal. If the entry is associated with an attached Outlook item or Office document, then you can also open the associated file as well. Once the journal entry is open, you can edit or modify the journal entry information. In journal entries that are associated with an Office document, editing the Journal entries will not impact the associated document in any way. In the Journal folder, you can also delete journal entries without having to worry about deleting the associated Office document. It is also true that you can edit or delete an Office document and it will not affect the associated Journal entry. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:05
To delete journal entries, select the journal entry that you want to delete within the Journal folder and then press the “Delete” or “Del” key on your keyboard. You can also select multiple journal entries by simply clicking on each one while holding down the “Shift” or “Ctrl” keys on your keyboard to make adjacent or non-adjacent selections, as needed. You can then press the “Delete” or “Del” key on your keyboard to delete the selected entries. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 10: Public Folders
02:39
With Outlook, you can create public folders to which you can post public conversation topics or any type of item that Outlook can store in its normal folders like e-mail, calendars, and tasks. This is a terrific feature to use for setting up meetings, scheduling your employees’ tasks, and posting general information topics into a folder that you want to be accessible to the people on your network. To benefit from this feature, however, you do need to use Outlook with a Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 or later on your network. Learn this and more during this lecture.
07:34
After creating the folder, you are the folder’s “owner.” It is up to you to decide which users on your network can access the folder, and also what types of activities they can do if they do have access to the folder. If you are the folder’s owner, or have been given the owner permission by the folder’s owner, you can set the folder’s permissions by right-clicking on the public folder for which you want to set the permissions and selecting the “Properties” command from the pop-up menu that appears. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:19
Within the “Properties” dialog box of a selected public folder, you can click the “Folder Assistant…” button on the “General” tab in Outlook 2013:2010 or on the “Administration” tab in Outlook 2007 to create, edit, delete, or turn on and off the rules you have created. Setting up rules for a folder is a fairly straightforward concept. A folder rule simply states that when items arrive to the folder that meet a specified criteria they will then be processed by whatever the rule dictates should happen when an item of that type is received. You can have multiple rules applied to a single folder. The rules will be acted upon in sequence from top to bottom through the list of rules. They can also be modified at a later date or deleted entirely if they no longer apply. You can also turn them on and off without having to delete and recreate them. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:34
You can copy public folders in your network. This allows you to also copy all of the permissions, administrative settings, and rules from the copied folder to the new folder so that you won’t have to reset them all over again as would be the case if you started with another new folder. If the folders will have similar settings, this can be a time-saving task. Even editing a public folder’s properties is often easier than having to recreate them all from scratch. Once you have copied the folder from one place to another, you should edit its properties accordingly and rename it. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 11: Personal & Private Folders
05:47
You can create a Personal Folder in your own computer to which you can store items from Outlook. You have to do this if you do not have a Microsoft Exchange Server and are using Outlook on a “stand-alone” computer. Even if you do have an Exchange Server, you can also create Personal Folders to which you can manually store Outlook items. A Personal Folder is a file type that ends with a “.pst” file extension. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:40
With all Outlook folders you can set AutoArchiving options. AutoArchiving allows you to automatically move messages from the specified folder to an archive folder or delete them from your specified folders, after a set period of time has elapsed. AutoArchiving reduces the number of items that Outlook will have to process when it opens a folder. It also reduces the amount of needed storage space in the Exchange Server for item storage. AutoArchiving will also perform this automatically, reducing the amount of time that you must spend manually archiving items. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:03
Private Folders are simply additional folders that you can create within your storage folder (exchange mailbox or .pst file) for organizational purposes. To create a Private Folder in Outlook 2013:2010, click the “Folder” tab in the Ribbon, and then click the “New Folder” button in the “New” group. To create a Private Folder in Outlook 2007, select “File| New| Folder…” from the Menu Bar. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:59
Search Folders are a great way to quickly find messages within your Outlook mail folders that match a criteria that you set. When you create a search folder, the criteria for which you are searching for is saved with the folder itself. Therefore, every time you open the folder, it searches for all of the Outlook messages that match the associated folder search criteria and then automatically displays these messages. Note that you can only create search folders for the “Mail” folders within Outlook. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 12: Notes
06:20
You use notes to create little “post-it” reminders for activities or tasks that are too small to block into your calendar schedule, but that you must remember to do. These notes will go into your “Notes” folder in your Outlook mailbox. Like the Journal, the Notes feature of Outlook 2013 is being deprecated. You can only access the Notes folder in Outlook 2013 by clicking the “Folders” button within the Navigation Bar and then selecting the “Notes” folder within the Folder Pane. Also, the “Notes and Journal” options within the “Outlook Options” dialog box has been removed for Outlook 2013. You also cannot change the attributes of notes within Outlook 2013 as you could in previous versions of Outlook. In Outlook 2010:2007, you can change the color, size and font of the note. In all versions of Outlook, Notes will appear with the time/date stamp of when they were created or last modified. Notes can be deleted, copied, forwarded and moved. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 13: Advanced Mailbox Options
04:41
A mailbox rule simply states that whenever items arrive into a mailbox that meet a specified criteria they should then be processed by whatever the rule dictates should happen when an item of that type is received. You can have multiple rules applied to a single mailbox. The rules will be acted upon in sequence from top to bottom through the list of rules created for that mailbox. They can also be modified at a later date, or deleted if they no longer apply. You can also turn them on and off without having to delete and recreate them. Learn this and more during this lecture.
11:01
You can create your own custom view of folders in your Outlook mailbox. If using Outlook 2013:2010, you create custom mailbox views by clicking the “View” tab in the Ribbon and then clicking the “Change View” button in the “Current View” group. From the drop-down menu that appears, you can then select the “Manage Views…” command. In Outlook 2007, you can do this by selecting “View| Current View| Define Views…” from the Menu Bar. Learn this and more during this lecture.
03:44
To block junk e-mail, you must first open the folder to filter for junk e-mail. If using Outlook 2013:2010, then click the “Junk” drop-down button in the “Delete” group on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon and select the “Junk E-mail Options…” command from the button’s drop-down menu. If using Outlook 2007, select “Actions| Junk E-mail| Junk E-mail Options…” from the Menu Bar. Learn this and more during this lecture.
00:49
You can assign any items in your Outlook folders to one of the available color categories. To do this, you simply open the Outlook folder that contains the item or items that you want to assign to one or more color categories. Then select the item or items in that folder which you would like to categorize. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:44
With Outlook, you can do an advanced find in order to find all Outlook items that belong to a particular category. You could also use the advanced find feature to find items in Outlook using many other types of filters as well. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Section 14: Outlook Options
01:20
You can add shortcuts to the folders in Outlook to the “Shortcuts” group on the Navigation Bar. To do this, first click the “Shortcuts” button in the Navigation Bar. Learn this and more during this lecture.
01:47
You can add additional user profiles to Outlook in order to let multiple people access the same computer but have access to different Outlook accounts. You will need to set up each profile using the “Control Panel” feature of Windows. Within the Windows “Control Panel,” you can click the “Mail” icon to access the mail settings. This will launch the “Mail Setup” dialog box. Here you can click the “Show Profiles…” button to access the “Mail” dialog box. Learn this and more during this lecture.
02:11
You can configure Outlook to access several different types of e-mail accounts. These may be POP3 or SMTP mail accounts or accounts on your Exchange Server. If connecting to a internet e-mail account, you will need to know the specific POP3 and SMTP server address information and your account name and password. You should contact your Network Administrator or ISP to acquire this information before attempting to configure Outlook e-mail accounts. Learn this and more during this lecture.

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TeachUcomp, Inc., Quality Software Training

Founded in 2001, TeachUcomp, Inc. began as a licensed software training center in Holt, Michigan - providing instructor-led, classroom-style instruction in over 85 different classes, including Microsoft Office, QuickBooks, Peachtree and web design, teaching staff at organizations such as the American Red Cross, Public School Systems and the Small Business Association.

At TeachUcomp, Inc., we realize that small business software can be confusing, to say the least. However, finding quality training can be a challenge. TeachUcomp, Inc. has changed all that. As the industry leader in training small business software, TeachUcomp, Inc. has revolutionized computer training and will teach you the skills to become a powerful and proficient user.

In 2002, responding to the demand for high-quality training materials that provide more flexibility than classroom training, TeachUcomp, Inc. launched our first product - Mastering QuickBooks Made Easy. The enormous success of our first tutorial led to an ever-expanding product line. TeachUcomp, Inc. now proudly serves customers in over 80 different countries world-wide including individuals, small businesses, non-profits and many others. Clients include the Transportation Security Administration, NASA, Smithsonian Institution, University of Michigan, Merrill Lynch, Sprint, U.S. Army, Oracle Corporation, Hewlett-Packard and the U.S. Senate.

Our full-time staff of software training professionals have developed a product line that is the perfect solution for busy individuals. Our comprehensive tutorials cover all of the same material as our classroom trainings. Broken into individual lessons, you can target your training to meet your needs - choosing just the lessons you want (and having the option to watch them all if you like). Our tutorials are also incredibly easy to use.

You will listen and watch as our expert instructors walk you through each lesson step-by-step. Our tutorials also feature the same instruction manuals (in PDF) that our classroom students receive - and include practice exercises and keyboard shortcuts. You will see each function performed just as if the instructor were at your computer. After the lesson has finished, you then "toggle" into the application and practice what you've learned - making it the most effective interactive training solution to learn on your own.

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