Mastering Windows 8.1 Made Easy Training Tutorial

Learn Introductory through Advanced material in Microsoft's Windows 8.1.
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  • Lectures 80
  • Contents Video: 4.5 hours
    Other: 2.5 hours
  • Skill Level All Levels
  • Languages English
  • Includes Lifetime access
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    Available on iOS and Android
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About This Course

Published 12/2013 English

Course Description

Learn Microsoft Windows 8.1 with this comprehensive course from TeachUcomp, Inc. Mastering Windows Made Easy features 77 video lessons with over 4 hours of introductory through advanced instruction. Watch, listen and learn as your expert instructor guides you through each lesson step-by-step. During this media-rich learning experience, you will see each function performed just as if your instructor were there with you. Reinforce your learning with the text of our printable classroom instruction manual, additional images and practice exercises. You will learn the basics of Windows, including creating basic documents, file management, using the internet and much more.

Whether you are completely new to Windows or upgrading from an older version, this course will empower you with the knowledge and skills necessary to be a proficient user. We have incorporated years of classroom training experience and teaching techniques to develop an easy-to-use course that you can customize to meet your personal learning needs. Simply launch a video lesson or open the manual and you’re on your way to mastering Windows. This course also includes a bonus separate curriculum for versions prior to 8, making an upgrade from earlier versions a breeze.

What are the requirements?

  • Basic understanding of computers

What am I going to get from this course?

  • Video Lessons
  • Includes Printable Instruction Manual
  • Windows Explorer
  • Windows 8.1 Settings
  • Windows Management
  • Using Apps
  • Using the Internet
  • Much more!

What is the target audience?

  • Anyone wanting to learn Windows 8.1!

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee.

Forever yours.
Lifetime access.

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android.

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section 1: Course Introduction
00:59

This lecture provides a brief summary of the topics covered throughout the course and offers suggestions for further reading and learning materials.

Section 2: Introduction to Windows
02:49

Windows is a family of operating systems developed by Microsoft Corporation. Windows provides a graphical user interface (GUI), virtual memory management, multitasking, and support for many peripheral devices. Starting in Windows 8, you also have a new “Windows 8” style interface that provides a standard user interface across your computing devices to create a unified user environment. Learn this and more during this lecture.

06:02

The Start screen was a new addition to the operating system first introduced in Windows 8. The Start screen is available on desktops, laptops, and tablets that run Windows 8 or later. You can scroll across the tiles shown within the Start screen to view many of the programs installed on your computer. Each tile represents an application, often referred to an “app.” Apps, or applications, are software programs. Some app tiles shown within the Start screen are called “Live Tiles” and display information from that particular app, such as the number of unread emails in your “Mail” application tile or the latest headlines within the “News” app. You can acquire new apps for your computer within the Windows “Store” app in the Start screen. Learn this and more during this lecture.

07:09

You can customize the appearance of the Start screen in many ways. You can control the placement and grouping of the app tiles, as well as name the tile groupings you create. You can also control the appearance of many of the individual app tiles themselves within the Start screen. In this lecture, we will examine how to make these types of customizations to the Start screen. Learn this and more during this lecture.

06:28

You can use the Charm Bar that appears at the right side of Windows 8.1 to search for content, share content within apps, return to the Start screen, manage connected devices, and access your device settings. You can access the Charm Bar by rolling your mouse pointer over to the upper-right or lower-right corners of the screen. The charm bar will appear and you can roll your mouse pointer over it to access the buttons within the Charm Bar. You can also open it by swiping in from the right edge of a touch screen or by pressing the Windows + C keys on your keyboard. Learn this and more during this lecture.

02:39

In Windows 8.1, the Desktop is simply another app that you can access from the Start screen. You can open the Desktop in Windows 8.1 from the Start screen by clicking the “Desktop” app tile within the Start screen. Some other apps will also be opened within the Desktop app in Windows 8.1 to maintain compatibility with the environment for which the software was designed. For example, if you add an app tile for a Microsoft Word 2013 installation to the Start screen in Windows 8.1, then Windows will open that application within the Desktop environment when you launch the program from the Start screen. Learn this and more during this lecture.

01:20

The Start button in Windows 8.1 is a small button that displays the Windows logo and is shown in the lower-left corner of the screen when you hover over that corner in the Start screen. It is always displayed at the left end of the Taskbar at the bottom of the Desktop app. Learn this and more during this lecture.

01:17

Starting in Windows 8.1, you now have the option of booting directly to the Desktop when you sign-in to your computer. You can also display the Desktop instead of the Start screen after closing all apps on a screen. In order to do this, first open the “Desktop” app by clicking that tile within the Start screen. Learn this and more during this lecture.

03:13

One way to navigate through the Windows environment is by using your mouse. A mouse is a device that you control with your hand. You roll it around on a pad. This allows you to move the mouse pointer, usually an “arrow” icon, on your screen to select files and folders. There are many variations of the mouse, but they are all designed to perform the same basic functions. Learn this and more during this lecture.

03:18

In Windows 8.1, many of the actions for which you previously would use a mouse can now be performed by using gestures on a touch screen for computing devices that support this behavior. In this lecture, we will examine the various gestures that are available in Windows 8.1 for touch screen devices, and which gestures translate to the traditional mouse clicks and movements. Learn this and more during this lecture.

03:39

While the ability to “snap” an app window to the side of the screen was introduced in earlier versions of Windows, you will find that snapping apps to the side of the screen is even easier in Windows 8.1. This feature allows you to lock up to four app windows open at a time so that you can have multiple windows open without having to toggle between them or having them overlap one another. The number of apps that you can display at once is related to the screen resolution of your screen. In Windows 8.1 you can also set the size of the snapped app windows to any ratio that you would like. They no longer are restricted to a quarter of the window. Learn this and more during this lecture.

01:59

Windows 8.1 allows you to use a “Microsoft” user account versus a “Local” user account. If you already have an old Hotmail e-mail address, an XBOX Live e-mail, a Windows phone, or a Windows Live e-mail, you can use those e-mail addresses as your Microsoft Account e-mail address. If you want to create a new e-mail address, you can sign-up for a free e-mail account at the new “Outlook.com” website, which used to be “Hotmail.” The website address is http://www.outlook.com. You can sign-in to Windows 8.1 using an email address and password. This email address will then become your Microsoft account. Learn this and more during this lecture.

04:47

The window is the basic element of the Windows operating system. You perform all activities in different windows within the application. Windows that appear within the Desktop will most often share a similar structure and layout. In this lecture, we will examine the features and functions that are commonly found within a standard Desktop window. Learn this and more during this lecture.

00:48

In longer web pages or documents that you have opened, you will need to use the available scroll bars within the window to scroll through the information. Scroll bars will appear at the right and bottom sides of a window if all of the window’s contents cannot be displayed at once. Learn this and more during this lecture.

01:55

When you need to turn off your computer, it is very important to do so properly. Do not simply unplug the computer or interrupt its power source! Doing so could possibly corrupt the information in your computer! Learn this and more during this lecture.

Section 3: File Explorer
04:54

File Explorer has been available in Windows for many, many years. However, in Windows 8.1, its appearance and functionality have been enhanced. It is also called “File Explorer” in Windows 8.1 while in most previous releases it was referred to as “Windows Explorer.” It doesn’t really matter what you call it, as long as you realize that Windows Explorer and the “File Explorer” app are the same thing. In this lecture, we will examine using File Explorer in Windows 8.1. File Explorer is a window that allows you to explore and manage the files and folders contained within your computer. When you open a library folder within Windows 8.1, for example, its content will be displayed within a File Explorer window. Learn this and more during this lecture.

04:12

You use File Explorer to navigate through the files and folders on your computer. Within the large pane at the right side of File Explorer, you will see the contents of the currently selected drive or folder. Within this pane at the right, you can double-click a drive or folder icon to open it. Windows will then display its contents in the pane at the right side, showing you any folders and files within that selected location. You can then repeat this process, moving through the folders within the computer to explore the files and folders within your computer. Learn this and more during this lecture.

01:05

Windows allows you to change the display of the files and folders shown in the right pane within the File Explorer window. This is just a matter of personal preference. Your options are to display folder items as “Extra large icons,” “Large icons,” “Medium icons,” “Small icons,” “List,” “Details,” “Tiles,” or “Content” in Windows 8.1. Learn this and more during this lecture.

02:48

Windows allows you to sort items within a folder. In Windows, you can sort the items that appear in the right pane by any file or folder attributes that are available, regardless of the view style selected. To do this in Windows 8.1, display the contents of the folder to sort within the right pane within the File Explorer. Then click the “View” tab within the Ribbon. Then click the “Sort by” drop-down button within the “Current view” button group on this tab. You can then select the attribute by which you want to sort the items shown from the drop-down menu that appears. Learn this and more during this lecture.

03:54

In order to perform many file management activities within File Explorer, you must first learn how to select files. You can select a single file in File Explorer by clicking it once. It will then be highlighted. The highlight indicates that the file is selected. When a file is selected, it has the focus of the Windows application and any commands that you subsequently perform will be applied to the selected file only. Learn this and more during this lecture.

00:55

To open a file that is shown within the right pane of the File Explorer window, double-click the file. Alternately, you can right-click the file to display a pop-up command menu. You can then click the “Open” command within the pop-up menu to open the selected file. Learn this and more during this lecture.

00:33

Windows records the history of folders that you have recently opened. To reopen a recently opened folder, you can use File Explorer in Windows 8.1. Learn this and more during this lecture.

01:15

After you begin to create and save files, you may want to create additional folders and subfolders to help you organize your saved materials. You can create a folder within almost any other folder on your computer’s hard drive. Sometimes you may also do this on shared network drives, assuming that you have the required network permission to do so. Learn this and more during this lecture.

01:31

You can rename files and folders you have created to reflect changes made to their contents or to correct typos made when originally naming the files or folders. However, you should only rename files that you have created. Many of the files and folders in your computer are used by Windows applications and renaming these could cause those programs to stop working. You could possibly even accidentally disable Windows itself! However, if you are the creator of the file or folder, you can rest assured that you are free to rename any files or folders you have created. Learn this and more during this lecture.

06:53

Once you’ve decided to start organizing your files and folders, you will want to move or copy files and folders to a new location. There is a difference between moving and copying files and folders. When you move a file or folder, you cut the original item and then paste it into a different location on your computer. When you copy a file or folder, you make an exact copy of the selected file or folder and then paste the copy into a new location in your computer. When you move a file, it is often referred to as “cutting and pasting.” When you copy a file, it is referred to as “copying and pasting.” Learn this and more during this lecture.

03:08

Many computers have a CD or DVD drive that can create recordable CDs or DVDs so you can save content from your computer onto removable media for transfer. To burn a CD or DVD, you must first insert a blank, recordable CD or DVD into the corresponding drive in your computer. Learn this and more during this lecture.

02:08

Routinely deleting files you no longer need can help keep your files and folders better organized as well as save space on your computer. However, before you delete a file you should be absolutely sure you will no longer need it in the future. Learn this and more during this lecture.

05:57

Libraries are collections of folders that contain files of a selected type. The libraries you receive by default in Windows 8.1 are “Documents,” “Music,” “Pictures,” and “Videos.” To view your libraries in Windows 8.1, expand the “Favorites” section within the left pane of the File Explorer window, if needed. Then click the “Desktop” within the left pane of the File Explorer window. Then double-click the “Libraries” folder that appears in the right pane of the File Explorer window to view the libraries in your computer in the right pane of the File Explorer window. These libraries contain different folders you commonly use to save files of that type within your computer. Learn this and more during this lecture.

04:59

You can also use File Explorer in Windows 8.1 to manage your computer and its hard drive. To do this, click the “This PC” icon at the left side of File Explorer. To manage a selected hard drive in your computer, then click the name of the hard drive to manage shown in the pane at the right side of the File Explorer window. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Section 4: Windows 8.1 Settings
03:45

You can access the settings in Windows 8.1 by clicking the “Settings” button within the Charm Bar. To show the settings for the currently displayed app on your computer, roll your pointer to the upper-right or lower-right corners of the Windows 8.1 screen until the Charm Bar appears. Then roll your pointer over the Charm Bar until it appears solid. You can also open it by swiping in from the right edge of a touch screen, or by simply pressing the Windows + C keys on your keyboard. Then click the “Settings” button within the Charm Bar to display the settings for the currently displayed app in a pane atthe right side of the window. Learn this and more during this lecture.

14:01

Within the “PC settings” app window in Windows 8.1, you can click the “PC and devices” command at the left side of the screen to display personalization and management options for your PC and its attached devices within this app window. Within this window, the categories of settings are listed in the pane at the left side of the screen. You click the setting categories shown in this listing to change their individual settings in the right side of this window. Note that you can click the “Back” arrow that appears next to the “PC and settings” title at the left side of the window to return to the main “PC settings” window. This lecture will examine the settings you can change within the “PC and devices” settings category. Learn this and more during this lecture.

04:19

Within the “PC settings” app window in Windows 8.1, you can click the “Accounts” category at the left side of the screen to display user management settings in this window. Within this window, the categories of settings are listed in the pane at the left side of the screen. You click the setting categories shown in this listing to change their individual settings in the right side of this window. Note that you can click the “Back” arrow that appears next to the “Accounts” title at the left side of the window to return to the main “PC settings” window. This lecture will examine the settings you can change within the “Accounts” settings category. Learn this and more during this lecture.

05:04

Within the “PC settings” app window in Windows 8.1, you can click the “SkyDrive” category at the left side of the screen to display remote storage settings in SkyDrive within this window. The categories of settings are listed in the pane at the left side of the screen. You click the setting categories shown in this listing to change their individual settings in the right side of this window. Note that you can click the “Back” arrow that appears next to the “SkyDrive” title at the left side of the window to return to the main “PC settings” window. This lecture will examine the settings you can change within the “SkyDrive” settings category. Learn this and more during this lecture.

07:27

Within the “PC settings” app window in Windows 8.1, you can click the “Search and apps” category at the left side of the screen to display search and other app settings within this window. The categories of settings are listed in the pane at the left side of the screen. You click the setting categories shown in this listing to change their individual settings in the right side of this window. Note that you can click the “Back” arrow that appears next to the “Search and apps” title at the left side of the window to return to the main “PC settings” window. This lecture will examine the settings you can change within the “Search and apps” settings category. Learn this and more during this lecture.

04:01

Within the “PC settings” app window in Windows 8.1, you can click the “Privacy” category at the left side of the screen to display privacy settings within this window. The categories of settings are listed in the pane at the left side of the screen. You click the setting categories shown in this listing to change their individual settings in the right side of this window. Note that you can click the “Back” arrow that appears next to the “Privacy” title at the left side of the window to return to the main “PC settings” window. This lecture will examine the settings you can change within the “Privacy” settings category. Learn this and more during this lecture.

06:37

Within the “PC settings” app window in Windows 8.1, you can click the “Network” category at the left side of the screen to display network settings within this window. The categories of settings are listed in the pane at the left side of the screen. You click the setting categories shown in this listing to change their individual settings in the right side of this window. Note that you can click the “Back” arrow that appears next to the “Network” title at the left side of the window to return to the main “PC settings” window. This lecture will examine the settings you can change within the “Network” settings category. Learn this and more during this lecture.

03:40

Within the “PC settings” app window in Windows 8.1, you can click the “Time and language” category at the left side of the screen to display time and language settings within this window. The categories of settings are listed in the pane at the left side of the screen. You click the setting categories shown in this listing to change their individual settings in the right side of this window. Note that you can click the “Back” arrow that appears next to the “Time and language” title at the left side of the window to return to the main “PC settings” window. This lecture will examine the settings you can change within the “Time and language” settings category. Learn this and more during this lecture.

07:17

Within the “PC settings” app window in Windows 8.1, you can click the “Ease of Access” category at the left side of the screen to display accessibility settings within this window. The categories of settings are listed in the pane at the left side of the screen. You click the setting categories shown in this listing to change their individual settings in the right side of this window. Note that you can click the “Back” arrow that appears next to the “Ease of Access” title at the left side of the window to return to the main “PC settings” window. This lecture will examine the settings you can change within the “Ease of Access” settings category. Learn this and more during this lecture.

05:28

Within the “PC settings” app window in Windows 8.1, you can click the “Update and recovery” category at the left side of the screen to display Windows Update and recovery settings within this window. The categories of settings are listed in the pane at the left side of the screen. You click the setting categories shown in this listing to change their individual settings in the right side of this window. Note that you can click the “Back” arrow that appears next to the “Update and recovery” title at the left side of the window to return to the main “PC settings” window. This lecture will examine the settings you can change within the “Update and recovery” settings category. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Section 5: Control Panel Settings
03:46

The Control Panel is used to change settings in the Windows operating system and the computer. In this screen you can change settings for the computer’s audio, monitor display, security settings, and many other aspects of your computer. Warning: Making changes to some of the items in the control panel can seriously alter your computer and how it functions. It may even cause the computer to not function properly. Do not make changes to any of the settings if you do not fully understand the implications of changing the settings. Learn this and more during this lecture.

07:26

You can personalize your Desktop to change its appearance. You can change the background image shown on the Desktop, the screen saver used, the sound scheme and more. To personalize the Desktop, right-click anywhere within the empty space on the Desktop and then click the “Personalize” command in the pop-up menu that appears. Alternately, you can click the “Appearance and Personalization” link within the Control Panel window when using the “Category” view and then click the “Personalization” link to display the same “Personalization” screen where you can change these Desktop settings. Learn this and more during this lecture.

03:10

You can change the screen resolution used by your monitor to change the available number of pixels shown onscreen. Note that the settings available will depend on the monitor used as well as the display driver installed. Changing the screen resolution changes the quality of the images displayed by increasing resolution as well as allowing for more display area onscreen. Many applications and features have a minimum or optimal screen resolution setting to use. Learn this and more during this lecture.

03:34

To ensure the preservation of your computer’s data, you should backup your data by copying your files to removable media, such as an external hard drive, network location, or USB flash drive at least once a week. Windows 8.1 provides you with the “File History” tool that backs up your computer’s library files, desktop, contacts, and favorites to an external hard drive or network location that you specify. In the event of catastrophic data loss, you can then restore those files from the external hard drive or network location back to your computer. Learn this and more during this lecture.

03:22

“System Restore” is a component of Windows 8.1 that you can use to restore your computer to a previous state if a serious problem occurs. During a system restore, you will not lose personal data files. System Restore monitors changes to the system and automatically creates easily identifiable restore points during procedures such as software installation. These restore points allow you to revert the system to a previous time, as if you had never performed the procedure. Restore points are often created at the time of significant system events, such as when an application or driver is installed. You can also manually create and name your own restore points at any time. Learn this and more during this lecture.

04:09

There are many ways to adjust the volume of the computer. You saw how you can click the “Audio” icon within the “Settings” panel of the Charm Bar to adjust the audio output of your computer. You also already saw how to set the sound scheme used by your computer within the “Personalization” section of the Control Panel when personalizing your Desktop. In this lecture, you will learn how to set additional advanced audio settings for your computer speakers and other connected audio devices through the Control Panel. Learn this and more during this lecture.

01:28

Most printers and other types of external, peripheral devices such as external hard drives or USB drives will be recognized and installed automatically by Windows when you plug them into a computer. This is the “Plug and Play” feature of Windows that allows the operating system to recognize new hardware and immediately install the drivers for the new hardware if connected to the Internet. However, if you need to manually install a printer or other peripheral device, that is also easy to do in Windows. Learn this and more during this lecture.

02:00

While you can download many apps from the Windows Store for your computer, you can also install software from CDs or DVDs. When you insert a disk into your computer to install new software, there is often an executable file on the disk that will start the software installation process for you. You simply follow the installation instructions shown within the installer that launches to install the software to your computer. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Section 6: Desktop Management
01:55

You can change the icons displayed on your Desktop in Windows 8.1. By default, you will only see the “Recycle Bin” icon shown on the Desktop, however, you can also add icons for other items that you frequently use to the Desktop so that you can simply double-click the Desktop icons to view them. Learn this and more during this lecture.

02:18

If you mistakenly delete a file from your computer’s “C:” drive, you can retrieve the file by using the Recycle Bin. Windows has a file deletion safeguard, called the Recycle Bin, which holds files and folders deleted from your computer’s hard drive until you decide to empty it. When you empty the Recycle Bin, Windows permanently deletes the items contained within it. Learn this and more during this lecture.

01:40

Instead of using File Explorer to navigate through the computer’s folders to find files in your computer, you can create a desktop shortcut that allows you to quickly open or access files, folders or programs. A desktop shortcut is an icon on your Desktop that opens an associated program, file, or folder when you double-click the icon. Learn this and more during this lecture.

01:34

The Taskbar is the thin toolbar that appears at the bottom of the Desktop within Windows 8.1. In Windows 8.1, the “Start” button appears at the far left end of the Taskbar. After that is the area where program shortcuts that you have been pinned to your Taskbar will appear. Learn this and more during this lecture.

03:04

You can move the Taskbar to any side of the Desktop that you want. It is placed at the bottom of the screen by default, but you can easily move it or resize it, if needed. To do this, right-click anywhere within the Taskbar and look for the “Lock the taskbar” command within the pop-up menu that appears. If there is a check in front of “Lock the taskbar” command, the Taskbar is locked in place and cannot be moved until the check is removed. Click the “Lock the taskbar” command to remove the check. Learn this and more during this lecture.

02:00

You can see the time and date displayed in the lower right corner of the Taskbar within the Desktop app window. You can click the date/time display in the Taskbar to view the date and time settings for your computer in a small pop-up window. In this window, you can click the “Change date and time settings…” hyperlink to open the “Date and Time” dialog box where you can set the date and time. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Section 7: Using Apps in Windows 8.1
04:08

With Windows 8.1, you can download apps for your computing devices from the Windows Store. Note that you must be signed into your computer using a Microsoft Account to download apps from the Windows Store. Learn this and more during this lecture.

02:47

You may see a new type of “Files” screen appear within apps when you perform functions such as saving an app file, opening an app file, or selecting a file within an app. The “Files” screen that appears within many apps allows you to quickly find, save, or open the selected type of file within your computer. However, there isn’t as much standardization with how file selection is implemented within individual apps as there is within a standard Windows component, such as the File Explorer window. Learn this and more during this lecture.

08:10

You can use the SkyDrive app to save files that you want to share in the “cloud” computing network if you are signed-in to your computer using a Microsoft Account. The SkyDrive gives you 7 GB of free storage space to which you can upload documents, pictures, videos, Microsoft Office files, and many other types of files. You can access SkyDrive by clicking the “SkyDrive” app tile within the Start screen when you are signed-in using the associated Microsoft Account. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Section 8: Creating Documents
03:11

In this lecture, we will explore the skill set you must acquire to create basic documents with the WordPad program in Windows 8.1. While you will certainly have more flexibility in creating documents when using a more sophisticated program like Microsoft Word, WordPad is included with Windows 8.1 to give all users basic document creation ability. This will also introduce you to some of the basic skills in word processing on a computer. You will learn how to create new documents, open documents you have created, edit text, save changes and close documents. Learn this and more during this lecture.

01:58

You may find it useful to copy text that you have already typed into a new document or move the text to another place within the current document. You can either move the text, or simply copy it and then paste the copy to a new location, leaving the original text intact. Learn this and more during this lecture.

03:29

You can change many characteristics of the appearance of all or any part of the text within your document. You can change the font face and size of the text. You can also bold, italicize or underline text as well as change its alignment within your document. Before you can apply any of these changes, however, you must first select the text that you want to change. Click and drag over the text to select it. The text that is selected will then receive the changes that you make to its appearance. Non-selected text will not be changed. Once the text is selected, you can click any of the formatting buttons to apply changes to the text. Learn this and more during this lecture.

01:39

After you have entered or edited text, or made any change to a document that you want to keep, you should save the document. When you save a document for the first time, you must use the “Save As” dialog box. Doing this gives WordPad a location to which the document will be saved and a file name. Give it a name that you will remember and be sure to remember where you saved it. Learn this and more during this lecture.

00:47

To open a document in WordPad, you first must know where the file is located and the name of the file. In Windows 8.1, click the “File” tab in the Ribbon, and then click the “Open” button to launch the “Open” dialog box. Use the “Open” dialog box to navigate to the folder that contains the file that you want to open. Learn this and more during this lecture.

01:05

You can print a document that you have opened in WordPad. In Windows 8.1, click the “File” tab within the Ribbon and then click the “Print” command button to launch the “Print” dialog box. In this dialog box, select the printer to use, if you have more than one, from the “Select Printer” area. Learn this and more during this lecture.

00:11

After you have saved your document, you can close it by simply clicking the “X” in the upper-right corner of the “WordPad” application window to close it. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Section 9: Drawing Pictures
01:25

In this lecture, we will explore the skill set you must acquire to create and edit basic image files with the Paint program in Windows. This will also introduce you to some of the basic skills in working with graphics on a computer. We will explore creating new images, editing images, and saving changes to the image files. Learn this and more during this lecture.

02:35

When opened, Paint shows a blank image document, by default. Here you can draw new shapes by first clicking the desired “Shapes” button to draw within the “Shapes” button group on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon. You must then select the fill style of the shape you are about to draw by clicking the “Fill” drop-down button in the “Shapes” button group in the “Home” tab of the Ribbon and then making a selection from the drop-down menu of choices that appears. You must then select the outline style of the shape you are about to draw by clicking the “Outline” drop-down button in the “Shapes” button group in the “Home” tab of the Ribbon and then making a selection from the drop-down menu of choices that appears. Learn this and more during this lecture.

01:55

To add text to an image, click the “Text” button in the “Tools” button group on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon. Then click into the image at the point where you want the text to appear. This will make a small text box for the text and place an insertion mark into the text box. Type the text that you want the text box to contain. Learn this and more during this lecture.

01:08

To use the “Eraser” tool, click the “Eraser” button in “Tools” button group on the “Home” tab within the Ribbon and then select an eraser size from “Size” drop-down to the left of the “Colors” button group on the “Home” tab in the Ribbon. You should then choose the background color of the document, which is usually white, as the “Color 2,” or fill color choice, for this tool. Learn this and more during this lecture.

00:34

To save a picture file for the first time, click the “Save” button in the Quick Access toolbar at the top of the Paint application window to launch the “Save As” dialog box. Navigate to the folder where you want to save the file within this dialog box. Learn this and more during this lecture.

00:36

To open a picture you have saved in Windows 8.1, open the Paint program and then click the “File” tab in the Ribbon. Then click the “Open” button in the drop-down menu to launch the “Open” dialog box. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Section 10: Using the Internet
03:22

The Internet is a collection of connected networks around the globe that share a common address scheme. The Internet began in 1962 as a computer network for the U.S. military, and over time has grown into a global communication tool. By design the Internet is decentralized. Each computer on the Internet is independent of each other. The operators of these computers can choose which Internet services to use and which local services to make available to the Internet community as a whole. There are a variety of ways to access the Internet. Most gain access through a commercial Internet Service Provider (ISP). Learn this and more during this lecture.

05:30

A “web browser” is a software application used to make navigating the Internet easy for the user by providing a graphical user interface, so the user can click menus, icons, or buttons rather than learning difficult computer commands. It is also called a “web client” because the browser application resides on the client computer, or the computer of the individual using it, rather than residing on a web server. Learn this and more during this lecture.

12:07

Internet Explorer 11 behaves differently as an app that you can access from the Start screen than its Desktop counterpart does. The app cannot install “add-ons” that enable the display of some web content, such as Adobe Flash. Therefore, if you cannot view a web page correctly using the Internet Explorer 11 app, then you can open the web page using the Desktop version which will allow you to install the “add-ons” necessary to correctly view the web page content. Learn this and more during this lecture.

02:07

In order to use many features within Windows, you must establish a connection to the Internet. Many offices and business computers will already have a connection to the Internet. At work, you can check with your Network Administrator to find out how you would connect. At home, you will have to set up your own connection to your ISP, which is an acronym for the term “internet service provider.” Learn this and more during this lecture.

02:30

While the Internet provides instant communication and information, there is a risk for your computer. Computers can transmit and receive computer viruses and other harmful types of malware (bad software) that can damage your computer or pose information security risks when connected to the Internet. For this reason, it is absolutely essential that your computer be up-to-date with its Windows Updates and also protected by some type of anti-virus program. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Section 11: Printing Information
01:32

If you have more than one printer or are on a network, you may have the option of printing to more than one printer. When you are using a program like Microsoft Word, you may want to print a hard copy of your document. In most Windows-based programs, you can print the current document by clicking the “Print” button within the “File” tab of the Ribbon. This will often display a “Print” dialog box or “Print” page, where you can select your printer choice. Learn this and more during this lecture.

00:47

Depending on which program you are printing from, the options that you may have for printing can vary slightly, but in general there are some things that you can almost always change about the printing options. Learn this and more during this lecture.

01:01

Sometimes you need to check the status of a print job that you have sent to a printer. To do this, double-click the “Printer” icon that often appears in the lower right corner notification area of the Taskbar within the Desktop after the print job has been sent. In the “Printer” window that appears, select the print job that you sent from the list shown to see its status. Learn this and more during this lecture.

04:52

You can print web pages that are displayed within Internet Explorer 11. However, the process differs between the app and desktop versions of Internet Explorer 11. You may also have some options when printing web page content that you do not normally have when printing from other apps or program as web pages have content that is arranged in a manner that is different from other types of printable materials, such as a standard word processing document. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Section 12: Conclusion
00:29

This lecture provides a brief summary of the topics covered throughout the course and offers suggestions for further reading and learning materials.

Section 13: Instruction Manual
139 pages

Windows Training Manual. Plus practice exercises and keyboard shortcuts.

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Instructor Biography

TeachUcomp, Inc., Quality Software Training

Founded in 2001, TeachUcomp, Inc. began as a licensed software training center in Holt, Michigan - providing instructor-led, classroom-style instruction in over 85 different classes, including Microsoft Office, QuickBooks, Peachtree and web design, teaching staff at organizations such as the American Red Cross, Public School Systems and the Small Business Association.

At TeachUcomp, Inc., we realize that small business software can be confusing, to say the least. However, finding quality training can be a challenge. TeachUcomp, Inc. has changed all that. As the industry leader in training small business software, TeachUcomp, Inc. has revolutionized computer training and will teach you the skills to become a powerful and proficient user.

In 2002, responding to the demand for high-quality training materials that provide more flexibility than classroom training, TeachUcomp, Inc. launched our first product - Mastering QuickBooks Made Easy. The enormous success of our first tutorial led to an ever-expanding product line. TeachUcomp, Inc. now proudly serves customers in over 80 different countries world-wide including individuals, small businesses, non-profits and many others. Clients include the Transportation Security Administration, NASA, Smithsonian Institution, University of Michigan, Merrill Lynch, Sprint, U.S. Army, Oracle Corporation, Hewlett-Packard and the U.S. Senate.

Our full-time staff of software training professionals have developed a product line that is the perfect solution for busy individuals. Our comprehensive tutorials cover all of the same material as our classroom trainings. Broken into individual lessons, you can target your training to meet your needs - choosing just the lessons you want (and having the option to watch them all if you like). Our tutorials are also incredibly easy to use.

You will listen and watch as our expert instructors walk you through each lesson step-by-step. Our tutorials also feature the same instruction manuals (in PDF) that our classroom students receive - and include practice exercises and keyboard shortcuts. You will see each function performed just as if the instructor were at your computer. After the lesson has finished, you then "toggle" into the application and practice what you've learned - making it the most effective interactive training solution to learn on your own.

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