Mastering Microsoft Office 2010 Training Tutorial
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Mastering Microsoft Office 2010 Training Tutorial

Learn Introductory through Advanced material in Access, Excel, OneNote, Outlook, PowerPoint, Publisher, Windows and Word
2.7 (3 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
89 students enrolled
Created by TeachUcomp, Inc.
Last updated 6/2013
English
Current price: $10 Original price: $30 Discount: 67% off
1 day left at this price!
30-Day Money-Back Guarantee
Includes:
  • 36.5 hours on-demand video
  • 16 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Video Lessons
  • Includes 16 Classroom Instruction Manuals
  • Access
  • Excel
  • OneNote
  • Outlook
  • PowerPoint
  • Publisher
  • Windows
  • Word
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • Microsoft Office software recommended for practice.
Description

Learn Microsoft Office 2010 and Windows 8 with this comprehensive course from TeachUcomp, Inc. Mastering Microsoft Office Made Easy features 688 video lessons with over 60 hours of introductory through advanced instruction. You get our EIGHT complete courses in Access, Excel, OneNote, Outlook, PowerPoint, Publisher, Windows and Word. Watch, listen and learn as your expert instructors guide you through each lesson step-by-step. During this media-rich learning experience, you will see each function performed just as if your instructor were there with you. Reinforce your learning with the text of our 16 printable classroom instruction manuals (Introductory, Intermediate and Advanced), additional images and practice exercises.  This complete Microsoft Office course covers the same curriculum as our classroom trainings and was designed to provide a solid foundation in Office.

Whether you are completely new to Microsoft Office or upgrading from an older version, this course will empower you with the knowledge and skills necessary to be a proficient user. We have incorporated years of classroom training experience and teaching techniques to develop an easy-to-use course that you can customize to meet your personal learning needs. Simply launch a video lesson or open one of the manuals and you’re on your way to mastering Office. Each individual application course is listed alphabetically.

  • The ACCESS curriculum begins at Section 1
  • The EXCEL curriculum begins at Section 22
  • The ONENOTE curriculum begins at Section 53
  • The OUTLOOK curriculum begins at Section 70
  • The POWERPOINT curriculum begins at Section 87
  • The PUBLISHER curriculum begins at Section 107
  • The WINDOWS curriculum begins at Section 121
  • The WORD curriculum begins at Section 133

Each curriculum includes 1, 2 or 3 classroom instruction manuals in PDF (Introductory, Intermediate, Advanced). You will find the manuals at the END of each application curriculum.

Who is the target audience?
  • Anyone wanting to learn Microsoft Office.
Students Who Viewed This Course Also Viewed
Curriculum For This Course
Expand All 712 Lectures Collapse All 712 Lectures 60:04:37
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Getting Acquainted with Access
5 Lectures 12:48
When Access opens, it displays a window which allows you to create a new, blank (empty) database or create a database from one of the templates shown. Once you create a database, you will then see the main Access user interface where you will design the database. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Preview 02:35

In Access, you are manipulating a contained collection of smaller objects. This is a database. Although the terms “database” and “table” are often used interchangeably, in Access you should refer to the entire collection of tables, queries, forms, reports, macros, and modules as the “database” and only refer to tables as “tables” for clarity’s sake. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Preview 01:50

Each type of database object is represented in the Navigation Pane, however the view that is displayed by default within the Navigation Pane may not allow you to view all of the objects easily. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Preview 01:55

To re-open a database you have already created and saved, first launch Access. In the listing at the side of the initial window you can simply click on the name of the recently opened database that you wish to reopen. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Opening and Closing Databases
01:33

A database is designed to store information and retrieve it at a later point in time. The many types of objects in a database work together to allow you to do this. However, in order to create an effective and useful database, you must learn how to design and create many different types of objects. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Database Objects
04:55
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Creating Relational Database Tables
7 Lectures 36:15
A new database is a container that will hold all of the tables, form, reports, queries, macros, and modules that you create. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Preview 01:27

A database should be simple, logical, and straightforward in its design. In general, you use forms to enter information into tables. The data is then stored into these tables, which are related to each other as necessary. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Preview 01:01

Access is a relational database application. So what does the term relational mean, and how is this important? The term relational describes the method used for storing data within the database tables. However, it may be easier to understand the relational model of data storage by contrasting it with another method of storage that you may be more familiar with: the ‘flat-file’ method. Learn this and more during this lecture.
The "Flat-File" Model of Data Storage
06:18

The relational model of data storage allows you to more easily and effectively model a complex entity or subject, like sales. The relational model of data storage eliminates redundant data entry and also creates less data to store, making the relational database model smaller and faster than the ‘flat-file.’ Learn this and more during this lecture.
The Relational Model of Data Storage
14:21

While there are no “hard and fast” rules about creating relational database tables, there are a few tips that you should try to follow when beginning database design. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Tips for Creating a Relational Database
04:07

Tables are so commonly thought of when one speaks of a database that the terms are practically interchangeable. A table is an organized structure that holds information. It consists of “fields” of information into which you enter your “records.” Learn this and more during this lecture.
Creating Relational Database Tables
06:52

In Access, you should assign a primary key to each table that you create. A primary key is simply a field or group of fields that acts as a unique identifier for each record in the table. So you should use a field or group of fields that will always contain a unique value as your primary key. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Assigning a Primary Key to a Table
02:09
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Using Tables
7 Lectures 10:15
While you can create a table in “datasheet view,” it is not recommended. It is a poor place to design tables due to its lack of control over the data types assigned to the fields, and its complete inability to change the properties of fields. If you do create a table in datasheet view, you should certainly view the table in “design view” at some point to ensure that it is correctly constructed. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Preview 01:14

When you are in datasheet view, you can move from left to right through the rows by pressing either the “Tab” or “Enter” keys on your keyboard. You can move from right to left by pressing “Shift”+“Tab” on your keyboard. You can also use the arrow keys on your keyboard to traverse the records, if you like. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Preview 01:51

In datasheet view, you will see a blank row that shows an asterisk (*) in the row selector box at its left end. That is the “New Record” row. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Adding Records in Database View
01:10

To edit a record in datasheet view, simply click into the desired field of the record that you want to edit to place the insertion point into the field. Once the insertion point is within the field, you can edit the field information just as you would in a text document. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Editing and Deleting Records in Datasheet View
01:34

Once you have created your tables, you may need to modify their structures at a later point in time. You should make the changes in the table’s design view. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Inserting New Fields
01:57

With Access, you do have the flexibility to rename fields that you have already created. You should be extremely careful when you do this, as any changes that you make to the name of the field are not necessarily updated in all of the related reports, forms, or queries that were previously created using the “old” field name. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Renaming Fields
01:19

You can also delete table fields that you do not use. Once again, make sure that there aren’t any queries, forms, reports or macros that make reference to the field or use data contained within the field before you delete it! Otherwise, those items will malfunction when you try to use them, and they will need to be modified before they will work again. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Deleting Fields
01:10
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Field Properties
9 Lectures 12:30
You can set the properties of the table fields that you create in the design view of the table. When you open tables in design view, you set up the fields using the top half of the screen, which is called the table design grid. Below that, in the “Field Properties” section, you set the properties of the field that is currently selected in the table design grid above on the two tabs labeled “General” and “Lookup.” Learn this and more during this lecture.
Preview 01:34

You can use the “Field Size” property of a text field to set the number that you type as the maximum allowable number of characters in the selected field. This can be useful in restricting the amount of data that can be entered into the field. Access allows up to 255 characters in a text field, and also assigns that as the default field size. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Preview 01:40

You can set the “Format” property for date/time fields to change the way that they will display dates and times in the table in datasheet view. The following settings are available for the “Format” property when you have a date/time field selected in Access. Learn this and more during this lecture.
The 'Format' Property for Date/Time Fields
01:11

You can set the “Format” property for logical fields to change the way that they will display in forms and reports. The following formats are available for logical fields in Access. Learn this and more during this lecture.
The 'Format' Property for Logical Fields
00:48

You can set the “Default Value” property to specify a value that the field should contain when it is created with new records. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Setting Default Values for Fields
01:31

You can set up input masks to dictate a pattern used for data entry in selected fields. Access provides an easy step-by-step routine called the “Input Mask Wizard” that helps you to apply input masks to selected “text” and “date/time” fields. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Setting Input Masks
01:55

You use the “Validation Rule” and “Validation Text” properties in tandem. Setting the “Validation Rule” property allows to use the “Expression Builder” dialog box to create a specific condition that will only allow data entry that meets the specified condition into the field. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Setting Up Validation Rules and Responses
02:48

You can also set the “Required” property for a selected field to either “Yes” or “No” to either require entry into the field, or not. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Requiring Field Input
00:28

You can set the “Allow Zero Length” property for a selected field to either “Yes” or “No” to either require the data entry in the field to be of a length greater than zero (basically, no “Spacebar” values), or not. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Allowing Zero Length Entries
00:35
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Joining Tables
3 Lectures 14:00
As you create tables in Access, you will want to be able to relate the tables so that you will be able to access information from them through their “shared” or “common” fields by which they are joined. In Access, you create relationships between tables in the “Relationships” window. Learn this and more during this lecture.
The Relationships Window
04:15

As you create the appropriate relationships between the tables in your database, you will need to set the properties of the table joins to ensure that they are set up as you would like. The main join property that you will need to set is the “Referential Integrity” of the join. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Enforcing Referential Integrity
05:18

Access can also create “lookup” fields within a table that can lookup the values in another table, query, or hand-typed list from which it will draw its values. If the field is looking up data from another table (versus a query or list), it will automatically create an additional join between the two tables which you will see in the Relationships window. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Creating Lookup Fields
04:27
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Indexing Tables
3 Lectures 06:33
When you create an index for a table, you define a way that the data in the table may be sorted, using the fields that are available. Indexing a table is simply a way of organizing the data in the table to allow Access to complete query searches and sorting more rapidly. Indexing can help speed up the time that it takes to complete queries in Access, given a few criteria are met first. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Indexes
03:02

When you are creating indexes, you want to try and use field values that will identify each record in your database as uniquely as possible. If you are a good database designer, there will already be a single field in your table that already does this: your primary key field. However, you can create additional indexes on other fields to use in queries for faster query processing. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Creating Indexes
02:34

If you have indexes in a table that you wish to delete, you can easily do so. Open up the table that contains the indexes that you would like to delete in table design view. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Deleting Indexes
00:57
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Queries
10 Lectures 26:46
You use a query to answer a question that you have about the information stored in the database tables. You can then further analyze the results that the queries pull to produce even more information than the query itself displays. Reports are often based on query results, upon which they then can perform additional mathematical and statistical calculations. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Using the Simple Query Wizard
04:15

To make a query in design view, click the “Query Design” button in the “Queries” group (“Other” group in 2007) on the “Create” tab in the Ribbon to create a new query in the query design view. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Designing Queries
08:15

When you add multiple tables to a query in the query design view, the joins that you have established between tables within the “Relationships” window appear in the query, allowing you to access information from any related tables. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Joining Tables in a Query
02:03

In Access, when you want to display records from a table based on the values within a selected query field, you need to enter a “criteria” for record selection. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Adding Criteria to the QBE Grid
01:00

When you are in query design view, you can run the query to view the result set by simply clicking the “Run” button in the “Results” group on the “Design” tab of the “Query Tools” contextual tab within the Ribbon. If the results aren’t what you expected, you may need to re-design the query structure. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Running A Query
01:02

In Access, when you are visually creating the query in the query design view, what you are really doing is visually constructing SQL code. SQL stands for “Structured Query Language,” and it is a multi-platform language used to access and retrieve data within many different database programs. Learn this and more during this lecture.
How is Using the QBE Grid Writing SQL Code?
00:59

You can sort the results of a query by any field displayed within the QBE grid when the query is viewed in design view. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Sorting Query Results
01:56

Sometimes when you are creating queries, you need to add a field to the QBE grid for criteria purposes only, and don’t particularly want the field itself to be displayed in the result set. Having additional fields to display in the result set can slow down query performance. Learn this and more during this lecture.

Hiding Fields in a Query
00:59

You can use comparison criteria in the QBE section of the query design view in order to search for criteria values that are not necessarily “equal to” a value. By using comparison operators, Access can expand its repertoire of query criteria to pull records that are “greater than” or “less than” a specified criteria value, for example. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Using Comparison Operators
02:31

Next you will look at filtering the result set of a query by using multiple field criteria. Most often when you have multiple criteria in a query, you will either want the query to show records that match both “value X” AND “value Y” in different fields, or show records that contain “value X” OR “value Y” within the same or different fields. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Using 'AND' and 'OR' Conditions
03:46
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Advanced Queries
6 Lectures 14:05
You can use the “BETWEEN…AND” condition to look for values within a field that are between and inclusive of “Value X” and “Value Y,” as specified. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Using the 'BETWEEN...AND' Condition
01:36

You can also use “wildcard characters” to add an additional level of flexibility to your queries. Wildcard characters represent unknown values. There are two main wildcard characters that you need to know: the asterisk “*” and the question mark “?.” Learn this and more during this lecture.
Using Wildcard Characters in Criteria
01:32

You can create calculated fields in queries. A calculated field is a field that is derived by performing some type of function upon values gathered from other table fields, or entered by hand. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Creating a Calculated Field
02:40

You can also create “Top Value” queries that will return the top or bottom results of a query, instead of all results. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Creating 'Top Value' Queries
02:05

You can create summary queries that can perform a mathematical function on another grouped field in a query. These are usually shorter queries often used for reporting. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Function Queries
02:24

You can also create parameters in your query criteria that will prompt you to enter in the value which will then be used as the query criteria value for the query before returning the result set. This is tremendously helpful, as it prevents many hours of editing and changing query criteria. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Parameter Queries
03:48
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Advanced Query Types
7 Lectures 26:55
Have you ever run a query and wished that you could save the result set of the query as a permanent table? In Access, that is exactly what the “Make Table” queries do. A “Make Table” query creates a new table as the output of a query, instead of simply displaying a query result set. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Make-Table Queries
03:18

If you want to make large-scale updates to the data in your Access tables based on a specified criteria, you can create “Update” queries to update selected field values based on whether or not the record matches a specified criteria. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Update Queries
05:02

You can use append queries as a way of “copying and pasting” records from one table to another table, based on whether or not the records match a specified criteria. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Append Queries
04:14

You can use a delete query to delete records in a table based on specified criteria. Deleting unnecessary records will speed up the performance of queries, reduce redundancies, and make for more smoothly operating databases. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Delete Queries
02:04

You can create crosstab queries to answer questions about how field data within a single table relates to each other. Crosstab queries display one table field down the left side of the result table, and another table field across the top of the table. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Crosstab Queries
03:30

You can use the “Find Duplicates” query to find duplicate records within a table. To create a find duplicates query, click the “Query Wizard” button in the “Queries” group (“Other” group in 2007) on the “Create” tab in the Ribbon. In the “New Query” dialog box, select the “Find Duplicates Query Wizard” and then click “OK.” Learn this and more during this lecture.
The 'Find Duplicates' Query
05:36

In a relational database, you aren’t supposed to have records in a “child,” or related, table which have no reference to a related record in a “parent” table. For example, in a “Sales” table that contains a “CustomerID” field, any reference placed into the “CustomerID” field should correspond to a valid “CustomerID” in the “Customers” table. Learn this and more during this lecture.
The 'Find Unmatched' Query
03:11
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Creating Forms
9 Lectures 16:46
Forms can have different functions within an Access database. You can use forms to create “switchboard forms” in Access, where users can click buttons that perform different actions- such as running a query and outputting the results to a report. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Forms Overview
01:08

A simple way to create basic data entry forms is to use the “Form Wizard” provided by Access. If using Access 2010, you can start the “Form Wizard” by clicking the “Form Wizard” button located on the “Create” tab in the “Forms” group within the Ribbon. Learn this and more during this lecture.
The Form Wizard
02:17

There are also several ways that you can create a basic data entry form using the buttons that are available in the “Forms” group on the “Create” tab in the Ribbon. Note that in Access 2010, some of these form choices have been moved to the “More Forms” drop-down button. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Creating Forms
02:30

Once you have created a data entry form, you can use it to edit, create, and navigate table records. Navigating within a data entry form is exactly like navigating through records in the datasheet of a table. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Using Forms
01:08

Once you have created a form, you can edit it. You can change the placement of the fields within the form, add or remove fields from the form, or add color to the form objects or background. In order to perform many of these tasks, you will need to switch to either the “Layout View” or the “Design View” of the form. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Form and Report Layout View
01:52

While Access may seem very complex with its multiple object types and the various views of each, it does actually use the same type of “Design View” and “Layout View” for both its forms and its reports. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Form and Report Design View
01:59

When you edit forms and reports, you are often editing the objects inside of the forms and reports known as controls. Notice that in form or report design view there is a gridline displayed that you can use to place and align the form and report controls. There is also a ruler which you can use for measurements. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Viewing the Ruler and Grid
01:20

When you place controls onto a form or report in design view, you can either enable or disable the “snap to grid” feature. Learn this and more during this lecture.
The "Snap to Grid" Feature
01:18

Most forms are connected to an underlying table or query from which they display and/or update the table data. In form design view, you can access the list of fields available to the form and simply drag and drop them onto your form to quickly add data controls to the form for data entry or display. Learn this and more during this lecture.
Creating a Form in Design View
03:14
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Founded in 2001, TeachUcomp, Inc. began as a licensed software training center in Holt, Michigan - providing instructor-led, classroom-style instruction in over 85 different classes, including Microsoft Office, QuickBooks, Peachtree and web design, teaching staff at organizations such as the American Red Cross, Public School Systems and the Small Business Association.

At TeachUcomp, Inc., we realize that small business software can be confusing, to say the least. However, finding quality training can be a challenge. TeachUcomp, Inc. has changed all that. As the industry leader in training small business software, TeachUcomp, Inc. has revolutionized computer training and will teach you the skills to become a powerful and proficient user.

In 2002, responding to the demand for high-quality training materials that provide more flexibility than classroom training, TeachUcomp, Inc. launched our first product - Mastering QuickBooks Made Easy. The enormous success of our first tutorial led to an ever-expanding product line. TeachUcomp, Inc. now proudly serves customers in over 80 different countries world-wide including individuals, small businesses, non-profits and many others. Clients include the Transportation Security Administration, NASA, Smithsonian Institution, University of Michigan, Merrill Lynch, Sprint, U.S. Army, Oracle Corporation, Hewlett-Packard and the U.S. Senate.

Our full-time staff of software training professionals have developed a product line that is the perfect solution for busy individuals. Our comprehensive tutorials cover all of the same material as our classroom trainings. Broken into individual lessons, you can target your training to meet your needs - choosing just the lessons you want (and having the option to watch them all if you like). Our tutorials are also incredibly easy to use.

You will listen and watch as our expert instructors walk you through each lesson step-by-step. Our tutorials also feature the same instruction manuals (in PDF) that our classroom students receive - and include practice exercises and keyboard shortcuts. You will see each function performed just as if the instructor were at your computer. After the lesson has finished, you then "toggle" into the application and practice what you've learned - making it the most effective interactive training solution to learn on your own.