Maintain the Attention of Any Audience
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Maintain the Attention of Any Audience

Engaging the Wandering Mind
New
0.0 (0 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
1 student enrolled
Created by Jason Teteak
Last updated 8/2017
English
Current price: $10 Original price: $50 Discount: 80% off
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Includes:
  • 1 hour on-demand video
  • 5 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Ask recall questions to help people remember what you have taught them
  • Ask leading questions to help the audience understand what you’re saying
  • Ask relevance questions so the audience can apply what you’re presenting
  • Ask expertise questions to tap the audience’s own knowledge
  • Define the learning styles
  • Use the agree and see if you’re right technique
  • Give targeted directionals
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • Make sure you download the workbook to help you follow along.
Description

You have to show your audience that in order to get the information they’ve come to hear, they have to listen to you. This advice seems deceptively obvious. I tell it to people who’ve come to me for presentation advice and they nod in agreement, as if to say, “Got it.” But they haven’t.

In his book Brain Rules, John Medina cites research that suggests after about ten minutes of listening to a particular topic, people’s minds wander. No presentation can be a success if you can’t get and keep your audience’s attention, but you may have searched in vain for a method.  

Who is the target audience?
  • Trainers
  • Teachers
  • Sales professionals
  • Project leads
  • Managers
  • Entrepreneurs
  • HR managers
Compare to Other Presentation Skills Courses
Curriculum For This Course
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Introduction
1 Lecture 06:53

You have to show your audience that in order to get the information they’ve come to hear, they have to listen to you. This advice seems deceptively obvious. I tell it to people who’ve come to me for presentation advice and they nod in agreement, as if to say, “Got it.” But they haven’t.

Preview 06:53
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Ask the Right Questions
2 Lectures 21:53

Ask recall questions to help people remember what you have taught them

“Do you remember the number one reason why audiences are hooked?” When I ask this question in a presentation, or on the page, I engage you. Whether you respond in your mind or aloud, you answer the question, and presto! I have your attention again. Why? Because when I asked you to remember, the left side of your brain was forced to work. That’s powerful. 

Ask leading questions to help the audience understand what you’re saying

In Bloom’s Taxonomy, a classification of learning objectives, synthesis is defined as “Compiling information in a different way by combining elements in a new pattern or proposing alternative solutions.”

A question that inspires synthesis accesses the right side of the brain. 

Ask relevance questions so the audience can apply what you’re presenting

When an audience isn’t hearing anything that seems useful, they become bored, stop paying attention, and think why bother?

People will stay attentive if they are getting something valuable from the presentation. One of the most powerful ways to keep your audience listening is to ask questions that help them see what you’re telling them is immediately relevant to their lives.

Preview 15:30

An expertise question is a question only certain members of the audience will have the knowledge to answer. Asking such questions acknowledges the depth of their knowledge and gives you credibility points for being aware of it.

Expertise questions also serve to get the attention not only of the experts (who will be thinking about the answers) but also the remainder of the audience (who for a change will be hearing from people other than you).

Ask the Right Questions Part 2 - Expert Questions
06:23
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Address Every Learning Style
1 Lecture 17:34

If your audience is learning, you have their attention. To present your content so you get the attention of everyone in the audience, you have to make sure you address each of the four learning styles: Step Learners, Talk Learners, Research Learners, and Create Learners.

This learning style model applies to all adults. Everyone can learn in all four styles, but not equally well. Each of the four learning styles is the predominant learning style of approximately one- fourth of the population, and everyone has a secondary learning style as well. 

Address Every Learning Style
17:34
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Give Targeted Directionals
1 Lecture 12:21

Yet another way to keep the attention of your audience is with a targeted directional. This is a short and sweet method that pays big dividends.

Whenever you want to get your audience’s attention, request that they do one of the following, depending, of course, on what items—handouts, monitors, slides, and so on—you are working with.

You want to sound confident, but not overbearing, so they’ll take action. You’ll have no trouble getting them to comply if you do it properly. 

Give Targeted Directionals
12:21
About the Instructor
Jason Teteak
4.7 Average rating
990 Reviews
10,554 Students
52 Courses
Author, Keynote & TEDx Speaker, CEO Rule the Room

Jason Teteak knows what it takes to Rule the Room. The master trainer and speaking presentation teacher has taught more than 50,000 people how to flawlessly command attention.

He’s won praise and a wide following for his original methods, his engaging style, and his knack for transferring communications skills via practical, simple, universal, and immediately actionable techniques.

Jason first made a reputation in the medical training industry, where he was known as “the presentation coach and trainer who trains the trainers.” Teteak’s attention to detail and precision in communicating definitive information was honed in serving this lifesaving industry.

In response to many requests, he began to offer personalized services and quickly developed a following as a private coach and a consultant whose clientele includes elite institutions, universities, and top corporate executives.

His new book, Rule the Room, was recently published in the summer of 2013. He has developed more than fifty presentation and communication training programs ranging in length from one hour to three days that serve as the basis for this unique, practical, and comprehensive course.