Learn Korean Grammar for TOPIK test 1-2
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Learn Korean Grammar for TOPIK test 1-2

A full course about basic Korean Grammar. More than 60 video lectures with additional PDF documents for each class.
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0.0 (0 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
4 students enrolled
Created by Anton Sokolin
Last updated 8/2017
English
Current price: $12 Original price: $55 Discount: 78% off
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Includes:
  • 6.5 hours on-demand video
  • 2 Articles
  • 61 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion

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What Will I Learn?
  • At the end of course students will be able to pass Korean language test TOPIK (Elementary, Beginner, Intermediate, Upper-intermediate levels).
  • We hope that this course will help you to learn Korean language by getting better understanding how you can use in different situations different grammatical structures.
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • All you need is to start the rest, we'll do it for you
  • We recommend you not only watch our video materials but also to check PDF files that we attached to each of our classes
Description

Dear student! 

AK Korean course was specifically designed for those students who want to get precise and detailed information about Korean language and Korean Grammar to pass the TOPIK test. Throughout the course, we will cover basic Korean grammar that is essential for the TOPIK test. Step-by-step we will walk you through this course by giving personal explanations of each grammar structure that you can see in your TOPIK papers (Korean language proficiency test for foreign students). 

Our goal is to help you to get a good grasp of Korean Grammar as quickly as possible. We have prepared a video lecture for each grammatical structure (more than 60 video lectures) with accurate descriptions of verb conjugations and examples of sentences that we carefully chose for you. Additionally, for your better understanding, we made PDF files for each video lectures where you can find all the explanations, additional materials related to the topic, and a list of new vocabulary that we covered in our videos. By the end of the course, you will be able to pass TOPIK test level 1 or 2 and will be able to participate in daily conversations, read and write in the Korean language.

In our first 20 videos, you will learn how to count with Korean numbers, use direction particles,  ask about time, use the Present, Past, and Future tenses. In our first 20 lectures, we used a whiteboard to make our explanations more visible by highlighting important parts and conjugation rules in the Korean language.

In the main part of our course, you will learn how to use Korean particles, make negations, show a contrast, express hope, reasons, and causes. Also, we will talk about how to make questions and suggestions in the Korean language.  By the end of the course, you will be able to use conditional statements, make plans and express intentions.


AK Korean Course Curriculum

Section 1

Our Promo Video

Section 2 Basic Korean Grammar

  1. N + 이다: Korean Verb "To Be".
  2. 있다: Korean Verb "To Be" - part 1.
  3. 있다: Korean Verb "To Be", "To have", "To Exist" part2.
  4. Sino-Korean Numbers.
  5. Native Korean Numbers.
  6. Telling the time in Korean.
  7. A/V + ㅂ니다/습니다: Present Tense Polite Style.
  8. A/V + 아요/어요: Present Tense Informal Polite Style - part 1.
  9. A/V + 아요/어요: Present Tense Informal Polite Style - part 2.
  10. A/V + 었어요/았어요: Past Tense.
  11. V + 고 있다: Present Continuous.
  12. V + ㄹ/을 거예요: Future Tense.
  13. A/V + 었었어요/았었어요: Past Perfect Tense.
  14. Word Negation.
  15. N + 은/는, N + 이/가: Particle for a subject or topic of a sentence.
  16. N + 을/를: Object particles.
  17. N + 와/과, N + (이)랑: "And" form to connect nouns.
  18. N + 의: Possession.
  19. Korean Dates_PPT

Quiz from section 2 (Basic Korean Grammar)

  

Section 3: Beginner Korean  Grammar - part 1

  1. N + 에/에게 (한테): "To" (direction).
  2. Time/Location + 에: "In", "On", "At".
  3. N + 에서: Location of a certain action.
  4. A/V + 고, N + (이)고: "And" connecting two sentences or several predicates.
  5. N + 마다: Every.
  6. N + 밖에: (Except for/Only).
  7. N + 도: "Also", "Too".
  8. N + 만: "Only", "Just".
  9. N + 동안, V + ㄴ/는 동안: "While", "During", "For".
  10. V + 아/어 있다: A state of action.
  11. N + 때, A/V + (으)ㄹ 때: "When", "During" - express a certain moment.
  12. V + 기 전에, N + 전에: "Before", "Ago" - V + (으)ㄴ 후에, N + 후에: "After", "In".
  13. -ㄴ/은 지… 되다: It’s Been… Since.
  14. N + 나/이나: Conjunction ‘Or’ and ‘Either’ for nouns.
  15. V + 거나: Conjunction ‘Or’ for verbs.
  16. V + 는데: Conjunction ‘But’ (a lighter version), plus background information.
  17. 아/어서: Expressing reasons.
  18. V + 기 때문에: Conjunction ‘Because’.
  19. V + (으)려고 하다: Intending to do something.
  20. V + 기 위해/위해서: 'In order to'/'For'.

Quiz from section 3 (Beginner Korean Grammar - part 1)

 

Section 4: Beginner Korean  Grammar - part 2

  1. V + (으)ㄴ 적이 있다: 'Have you ever'.
  2. V + 어/아 보다: 'To have an experience of'.
  3. A/V: 을 것 같다: 'It seems to be'/'Might be'.
  4. V + 았/었으면 좋겠다: 'I wish I...'.
  5. 아/어지다: 'To become, to get', 'To turn'.
  6. V/A+게 되다: 'Change of  state'.
  7. V + 기로 하다: 'To decide to do something'.
  8. ㅂ/읍시다: 'Let’s'/'Shall'.
  9. V + 아/어/야 되다/하다: 'Must'.
  10. V + ㄹ/을 수 있다/없다: 'Can' or 'Can not'.
  11. V + 아/어 + 도 되다: 'May I'.
  12. 지만: Conjunction ‘But’ for connecting sentences and clauses.
  13. A/V + 아/어도: 'No matter how', 'Even though'.
  14. V + 보다: Making Comparisons.
  15. V + (으)러 가다/오다: 'To go'/'Come to do something'.
  16. 에서-까지, 부터-까지: Particles ‘From -To’, ‘From - Until’.
  17. V/A+겠어요: Intention ‘Will’.
  18. V+을/ㄹ까요: ‘Shall we ... ?’/‘Why don’t we ... ?’/‘Do you want me to ... ?
  19. 자마자: 'As soon as'.
  20. V/A+(으)면: Conjunction ‘If’.
  21. A/V + 는 줄 알다/모르다: 'Know how to do'/'Do not know how to do'.
  22. N+(으)로 - 'By', 'To', 'With'; N+(으)로 'By'(a tool), 'To/Towards' (direction).
  23. N,A/V+(으)L/는지 Conjunctions ‘That, 'What', 'Where', 'When'.

Quiz from section 3 (Beginner Korean Grammar - part 2)

Our team consists of professionals that have passed TOPIK test with levels 4 and 5, studying and living in South Korea for more than 5 years. Our course is the ultimate solution for those who want to master their skill of Korean grammar. This course wouldn’t be possible without help of native speakers who proofread our material, and made sure the absence of mistakes and inaccuracies. Because our course consists of the detailed explanations with tons of examples we believe that your journey into Korean language will be successful and joyful.

Who is the target audience?

  • Students, young professionals, those people who want to study Korean language from zero, or those who studied it before and want to master their language skills.  
  • Anyone Seeking to boost their language skill, while gaining an in-depth knowledge of Korean grammar 
  • People who want to pass TOPIK (Korean language proficiency test) level 1-2. 

Taking this course is perhaps going to be the best decision you will ever make if you are going to understand Korean grammatical structures. It is not just about the content and context, it is more to do with the way the course is delivered and our ability to debunk complicated grammar points. Our philosophy is; if you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. We explain everything using simple English to make sure you make the most of this course. We believe that you will master in Korean language by studying in our class. Your success is our priority. 

Wish you good luck!
AK Korean Language team 
Skype: Kakimdanabaev, live:antonsokolin_1 
Korean phone number: 010 9648 5655 

Who is the target audience?
  • People who want to pass Korean language test TOPIK and those who want to get a full picture about Korean grammar
  • We believe that anyone can master in Korean language and as a result be able to pass TOPIK (Korean language proficiency language test)
Compare to Other Korean Language Courses
Curriculum For This Course
63 Lectures
06:32:49
+
Start Here
2 Lectures 06:11

AK Korean Course Curriculum
02:49
+
Basic Korean Grammar
18 Lectures 02:17:12

이다 in Korean plays a very similar role as the verb To Be in English. It is mostly used to express that the subject of a sentence equal to the predicate. For example, it is used in such sentences, as "I am a student", "It is a bag", "He is a teacher" and so on. Also, this verb is used to ask questions, such as "What is this/that?" and "Who is this/that?".

Preview 07:04

The verb 있다 can have different meanings according to the context or situation. First, it can indicate the location of a certain object, similarly to the English expression of 'There is/There are'. Second, it can indicate the possession of something by the speaker or by the listener, similarly to the verb 'To have' in English.

있다: Korean Verb "To Be" - part 1.
07:04

The verb 있다 can have different meanings according to the context or situation. First, it can indicate the location of a certain object, similarly to the English expression of 'There is/There are'. Second, it can indicate the possession of something by the speaker or by the listener, similarly to the verb 'To have' in English.

있다: Korean Verb "To Be", "To have", "To Exist" part2.
08:40

Generally, numbers in the Korean language are divided into two groups depending on their origin. One group is Sino-Korean numbers which originated from Chinese numbers. Another group is Native Korean numbers. These two groups are both widely used in everyday life, though the use of them differs according to the situation.

Sino-Korean Numbers.
10:48

The second group of Korean numbers is called Native Korean numbers because they originated in Korea and differ from their Sino-Korean counterparts by the pronunciation and use. These numbers are usually used to express age, hours, and to count certain objects or people.

Native Korean Numbers.
04:51

In this lesson, we will introduce you how to use time expressions in Korean Language. In previous classes we learned pure Korean and Sino-Korean numbers. So today it’s time to understand how to say “What time is it now”. 

Telling the time in Korean.
06:45

In this lesson, we will introduce you the first type of present tense that exist in Korean Language. -(스)ㅂ니다 is a formal verb/adjective ending and in Korean language it refers a formal/polite verb ending.

A/V + ㅂ니다/습니다: Present Tense Polite Style.
08:12

In this lesson, we will introduce you another type of present tense that exist in Korean Language. - 아/어요. This is another type of a Present Tense in Korean language. It’s commonly used in a everyday life.

A/V + 아요/어요: Present Tense Informal Polite Style - part 1.
09:57

In this lesson, we will introduce you another type of present tense that exist in Korean Language. - 아/어요. This is another type of a Present Tense in Korean language. It’s commonly used in a everyday life.

A/V + 아요/어요: Present Tense Informal Polite Style - part 2.
08:48

In this lesson, we will introduce you the Past Tense of Korean language 았/었어요. As you know from our previous lesson this grammar pattern is commonly used in a everyday life. You will hear this grammar everywhere in the street, restaurants, theatre, cinema, in the market… So if you want to say about something in the past add 았/었어요 to the infinitive form of verbs and adjectives.

A/V + 었어요/았어요: Past Tense.
10:43

In this lesson, we will introduce you progressive tense that exists in Korean Language. In English 고 있다 has a meaning  “I am ____ ing (I am doing something right now).

V + 고 있다: Present Continuous.
04:41

In this lesson, we will introduce you future tense that exist in Korean Language 을 거예요. When a verb is changed into this form, it takes the meaning of “to be going to” do something or “will” do something. 

V + ㄹ/을 거예요: Future Tense.
08:01

In this lesson, we will introduce you the Korean Past Perfect Tense. The Past Perfect Tense expresses an action that had started and finished in the past. This may also be implied with the regular Past tense, however, the Past Perfect Tense is misunderstood for an already completed action. It is the equivalent of saying “had” or “did” in English.

A/V + 었었어요/았었어요: Past Perfect Tense.
05:59

In our first lesson we learned about the Korean verb To Be (이다) and how it conjugates. Now the time to make negative sentences with this verb has come.

The negative form of 이다 is 아니다.

When using the Formal Polite Style of Korean language it has a form of 아닙니다.

In the case of the Neutral or Informal Polite Style it takes a form of 아니에요.

Word Negation.
11:41

이/가 is a particle that is attached to the noun in a sentence to indicate that noun as the subject of the sentence.

And 은/는 is a particle that is attached to the noun in a sentence to indicate the topic of a sentence or of a whole paragraph.

N + 은/는, N + 이/가: Particle for a subject or topic of a sentence.
11:28

In this lecture we will study the object particle 을/를 in Korean language. As we can get it from the name, 을/를 are added to a certain noun to determine it as an object of the sentence.

N + 을/를: Object particles.
04:59

These three conjunctions play the same role in Korean, as the conjunction ‘and’ in English does. However, ‘and’ in English can connect both words within a sentence, and different clauses of a sentences. In Korean, on the other hand, N와/과, N(이)랑, N하고 can only connect nouns within a sentence, and for connecting different verbs and clauses Koreans use another set of conjunctions that we will talk about later.

N + 와/과, N + (이)랑: "And" form to connect nouns.
07:23

•The most formal manner of expressing the full date and/or time is to suffix each of the year, month, day, hour, minute and second with the corresponding unit and separating each with a space.

Korean Dates_PPT
00:08

In this section you can check how well you learn and understand the basic Korean Grammar from Section 2. 

Quiz from section 2 (Basic Korean Grammar)
14 questions
+
Beginner Korean Grammar
20 Lectures 02:03:13

n this lesson, you will learn how to use Korean participles “from” “to”. N에서/N부터 N까지 are used after places/times just like "from" and "to" in English. The difference of those two is that ‘-부터’ is often used for time, -에서 is often used for place. And -까지 means ‘to-‘ or ‘until-‘, you can use it for both time and place. Those grammatical structures you have to add to the Nouns that indicates places or time.

Preview 05:28


In this lesson, you will learn how to use locative particle in Korean language. 에서 indicates the location where a certain action happens.

N + 에서: Location of a certain action.
05:19

In this lesson, you will learn how to use V/A고, N(이)고 particle in Korean language. 고 is used to connect two nouns, verbs or adjectives and can be translated as ‘and’. Note that the tense is indicated in the final clause, so +고 is simply added to the word’s stem. Sometimes you can just use 그리고 to connect two sentences and this also means ‘and’. However, we will talk about it later. For now, just remember that the most basic usage of (이)고 is to indicate that one action occurs, and then something happens after that. You will hear many times this grammar so please try to memorize it.

A/V + 고, N + (이)고: "And" connecting two sentences or several predicates.
06:24

In this lesson, you will learn how to use 마다 participle in Korean language. 마다 is used after nouns and means ‘every’, ‘every’. It attaches to nouns and time expressions such as 달/월 (month) and 주 (week). Here’s some examples of using this grammar pattern.

Preview 03:09

In this lesson, you will learn how to use 밖에 particle in Korean language. –밖에 is used after numbers, and it means, “only this amount of something”, “only” or “nothing but”.’ This particle is usually used with negative verbs. In other words, when you want to show that the quantity is less than one’s expectations please use this grammatical structure.

N + 밖에: (Except for/Only).
04:36

In this lesson, you will learn how to use 도 participle in Korean language. 도 is used after nouns and means 'too' or 'also'. Please keep in mind one important note that 도 always refers to the subject. In English we would say “I also have been in Italy last year”, so this “also” will be 도 in Korean.

N + 도: "Also", "Too".
02:48

In this lesson, you will learn how to use 만 particle in Korean language. 만 literally means 'only'. You can use this grammar only after nouns. You can also translate it as ‘just’.  

N + 만: "Only", "Just".
03:25

In this lesson, you will learn how to use 는 동안 in Korean language. 는 동안 is a conjunction that express length of time or duration. In English you can translate it as ‘during/while’. You can use this grammatical pattern with Nouns and Verbs. Remember when you use it with Nouns you just add 동안 to the word. For example 방학 동안 – during the break. When you use it with Verbs use 는 동안. For example 먹는 동안. For better understanding please take a look to our examples.

N + 동안, V + ㄴ/는 동안: "While", "During", "For".
07:33

V + 아/어 있다: A state of action.
07:36

In this lesson, you will learn how to use N + 때, A/V + (으)ㄹ 때 particle in Korean language. N + 때, A/V + (으)ㄹ 때 is used when you want to express a certain moment or a period of time, when some action happens. Literally it means ‘when’, ‘during’. You can conjugate it in for Past Tense by using 었/았/였을 때. Usually Koreans use this grammar in the form ㄹ/을 때마다 which mean ‘every time when I do something’.

N + 때, A/V + (으)ㄹ 때: "When", "During" - express a certain moment.
08:25

In this lesson, you will learn how to use before and after. V + 기 전에 is attached to a verb’s stem to convey the meaning of 'before'. N + 후에 V + (으)ㄴ 후에 this pattern is used to describe what happens after a particular action. 후 means ‘after’ or ‘after doing something’.

V + 기 전에, N + 전에: "Before", "Ago" - V + (으)ㄴ 후에, N + 후에: "After", "In".
09:24

In this lesson, you will learn how to use V + (으)ㄴ 지 ~ 되다 grammatical structure in Korean language. V + (으)ㄴ 지 ~ 되다 is used to show time since when you start doing a certain action. You can use this grammar to show duration of some action’s period. For example you want to say ‘I have been living in Korea for 5 years’. To express this thought you should better use V + (으)ㄴ 지 ~ 되다. So your sentence will be ‘한국에서 산 지 5 년이 됬어요.

-ㄴ/은 지… 되다: It’s Been… Since.
07:03

In this lesson, you will learn how to use (이)나 particle in Korean language. The typical English translation for (이)나 is ‘or.’. Please keep in mind that after nouns ending in a consonant you should use 이나, but after nouns ending in a vowel just 나. Remember that you use this grammar only with nouns. In the case you want to use it with verbs you should use another grammatical pattern 거나. You will learn about it from our classes.

N + 나/이나: Conjunction ‘Or’ and ‘Either’ for nouns.
05:28

In this lesson, you will learn how to use V/A + 거나 particle in Korean language. V/A + 거나 is used when a speaker has a choice of several options.. It indicates two or more events or actions. This grammar is similar to the (이)나 that attaches to nouns whereas 거나 to verbs and adjectives. You can translate it into an English as 'or'.  It can be used to show that the result will/would be the same regardless of the preceding statements. 

V + 거나: Conjunction ‘Or’ for verbs.
05:16

In this lesson, you will learn how to use A/V-(으)ㄴ/는데, N +(이)ㄴ데 partiсle in Korean language. A/V-(으)ㄴ/는데, N +(이)ㄴ데 is used in the casual spoken Korean. 는데/데 means ‘but’. Koreans also use this grammar to give some background information about a certain fact. So you can use (으)ㄴ/는데 if you want to give additional supportive information. Finally, it also can indicate a change of condition.

V + 는데: Conjunction ‘But’ (a lighter version), plus background information.
07:33

In this lesson, you will learn how to use V/A + 아/어서 participle in Korean language. V/A + 아/어서 is used when you want to show the reason or to connect two sentences. -아서 with verbs that have a either the vowel ㅗ (o) or ㅏ (a) in the verb stem’s final syllable. 어서 with verbs that have any vowel other than the vowels ㅗ (o) or ㅏ (a) in the verb stem’s final syllable. The verb stem of 하다 conjugates to 해요 (하’  + 여서 => 하여 => 해).

아/어서: Expressing reasons.
06:11

In this lesson, you will learn how to use N + 때문에 / A.V+기 때문에 in Korean language. This grammatical structure is used to show reason why one action takes places. Simple you can translate it as ‘Because’. 때문에 can be used to show a positive reason as well as negative. Please keep in mind that when you attach it to nouns use the 때문에 form and when you are adding it to adjectives and verbs 기 때문에.

V + 기 때문에: Conjunction ‘Because’.
04:42

In this lesson, you will learn how to use V+(으)려고 하다 participle in Korean language. This grammatical structure expresses intention or determines about some certain actions. In English you can translate it as ‘I am going to’. Remember that you must use it only with verbs.

V + (으)려고 하다: Intending to do something.
07:00

V + 기 위해/위해서: 'In order to'/'For'.
08:27

In this section you can check how well you learn and understand the basic Korean Grammar from Section 3 

Quiz from section 3 (Beginner Korean Grammar - part 1)
20 questions
+
Beginner Korean Grammar - part 2
23 Lectures 02:07:10

In this lesson, you will learn how to use V+아/어 보다 & V+ㄴ/은 적이 있다/없다 in Korean language. First you have to know that both of 보다 and 적이 있다/없다 expresses people experience about something. -아/어/여 보다 (attempt / try …) and -(으)ㄴ 적이 있어요(have an experience) together. One more detail Korean use -아/어/여 보다 In essence, telling somebody to “try” something. For example: 이 것을 먹어 봐!  - try to it this! It’s a really common Korean grammatical structure that you will meet in your everyday life so be prepared and learn it by heart.

V + (으)ㄴ 적이 있다: 'Have you ever'.
05:17

In this lesson, you will learn how to use V+아/어 보다 & V+ㄴ/은 적이 있다/없다 in Korean language. First you have to know that both of 보다 and 적이 있다/없다 expresses people experience about something. -아/어/여 보다 (attempt / try …) and -(으)ㄴ 적이 있어요(have an experience) together. One more detail Korean use -아/어/여 보다 In essence, telling somebody to “try” something. For example: 이 것을 먹어 봐!  - try to it this! It’s a really common Korean grammatical structure that you will meet in your everyday life so be prepared and learn it by heart.

V + 어/아 보다: 'To have an experience of'.
04:45

In this lesson, you will learn how to use  것 같아요grammatical structure in Korean language. 것 같아요 is used after verbs /nouns/ adjectives and means your suggestions based on your experience. 

A/V: 을 것 같다: 'It seems to be'/'Might be'.
09:11

In this lesson, you will learn how to use V/A- 았/었으면 좋겠다 in Korean language. V/A- 았/었으면 좋겠다 is the grammatical structure that expresses a wish or a hope, and just like when the English verb 'to wish' . Even though the past tense -았/었/였- is used, this pattern does not refer to the past.

V + 았/었으면 좋겠다: 'I wish I...'.
04:31

In this lesson, you will learn how to use  아/어지다 grammatical structure in Korean language. 아/어지다is used after adjectives and means to become, to get, to turn. 

아/어지다: 'To become, to get', 'To turn'.
04:48

~게 되다 is used to express the change of one state to another or change of preferences. It usually translates into English as ‘to come to.. V-ing something’, ‘become V-ing something’, ‘reach the point of V-ing’.

V/A+게 되다: 'Change of state'.
07:55

V+기로 하다 is used to express the speaker’s promise or resolution to to take a certain action. It can be used to express promises to yourself or to the listener.

V + 기로 하다: 'To decide to do something'.
05:56

In this lesson, you will learn how to use ㅂ시다 particle in Korean language.ㅂ시다 is used after verbs and means “Let’s do something”.

ㅂ/읍시다: 'Let’s'/'Shall'.
04:25

In this lesson, you will learn how to use V/A - 아/어야 되다/하다 grammatical structure in Korean language. This grammar is equivalent to ‘Must’ in English. You can use with adjectives and verbs. One more detail ‘-아/어야 돼요’ is used more often in colloquial situations. However, 아/어야 하다 in writings or essays.

V + 아/어/야 되다/하다: 'Must'.
05:19

In this lesson, you will learn how to use V – 을 수 있어요/없어요 in Korean language. V – 을 수 있어요/없어요 is used to express ability/possibility or inability/impossibility. ~을(ㄹ) 수 있어요 indicates ability, capability, possibility or permission. ~을(ㄹ) 수 없어요 is the negative form. In English you can translate it as ‘Can’ ‘Can not’.

V + ㄹ/을 수 있다/없다: 'Can' or 'Can not'.
05:26

In this lesson, you will learn how to use V/A - 아/어도 되다 in Korean language. This grammatical structure has an equivalent version in English ‘May I’. You can use it with Verbs and Adjectives. Remember, If the last vowel of the stem is ‘아’ or ‘오’, ‘-아도 되다’ is added. If the last vowel of the stem is a vowel other than ‘아’ or ‘오’, ‘-어도 되다’ is added.

V + 아/어 + 도 되다: 'May I'.
04:21

In this lesson, you will learn how to use A/V-지만, N + (이)지만 particle in Korean language. A/V-지만, N + (이)지만 is used to express the conjunction ‘but’ and to mark a contrast between two clauses. It’s very common and widely used grammatical pattern so please try to memorize it properly.

지만: Conjunction ‘But’ for connecting sentences and clauses.
04:50

In this lesson, you will learn how to use 아/어도 grammatical structure in Korean language. 아/어도is used after verbs and means 'No matter how, even though’. 

A/V + 아/어도: 'No matter how', 'Even though'.
04:55

In this lesson, you will learn how to use 보다 particle in Korean language. 보다 is used after nouns and means a comparison. So whenever you want to compare two things, you can use this grammatical particle. When 보다 is used with verbs, it conveys a meaning that something is being done better by someone than by someone else. You can use 더 (more) if you want to emphasize your sentences or you can omit it. Literally, if we try to translate this grammar to English it means ‘than’. Let’s see some examples how you can use this grammar in real life situations.

N + 보다: Making Comparisons.
04:51

In this lesson, you will learn how to use V + (으)러 가다/오다 in Korean language. This grammatical structure is used when you want to express the purpose of going somewhere. It occurs after verbs. Literally it means ‘to go/come to do smth’ or you can also translate it as ‘purpose’ or ‘in order to~’.  To conjugate it just replace 다 with 러 가다/갔어/갔다/갔어요/갔습니다

V + (으)러 가다/오다: 'To go'/'Come to do something'.
04:31

In this lesson, you will learn how to use Korean participles “from” “to”. N에서/N부터 N까지 are used after places/times just like "from" and "to" in English. The difference of those two is that ‘-부터’ is often used for time, -에서 is often used for place. And -까지 means ‘to-‘ or ‘until-‘, you can use it for both time and place. Those grammatical structures you have to add to the Nouns that indicates places or time.

에서-까지, 부터-까지: Particles ‘From -To’, ‘From - Until’.
06:27

A/V+겠어요 is used to express the speaker’s intention or plan to perform a certain action. Note that this grammar structure cannot be used with subjects in the 3rd person, as this grammar is usually used by the speaker. To conjugate verbs and adjectives, you need to drop the infinitive ending -다, and attach 겠어요 to its place.

V/A+겠어요: Intention ‘Will’.
05:15

V+(을)ㄹ까요? is used by the speaker to express a suggestion about doing a certain with the listener. This grammar is usually translated into English as ‘Shall we..V?’, ‘Why not to.. V?’.

V+을/ㄹ까요: ‘Shall we ... ?’/‘Why don’t we ... ?’/‘Do you want me to ... ?
03:47

In this lesson, you will learn how to use V + 자마자 participle in Korean language. V + 자마자 is used when you want to say ‘as son as’, ‘right after’. You can use it when you want to show that you finish one action and then straight forward start doing another one. It’s similar with ‘고나서’ form. However in ‘고나서’ case it shows that a short period of time passed between two actions whereas V + 자마자 indicates “right after’. You can also can use a shorted version of this grammatical patter ‘자’.

자마자: 'As soon as'.
05:24

A/V+(으)면 is used to express conditional statements, such as ‘if’ statements that we use in English. A/V+(으)면 can be translated as ‘if’ and ‘then’. Remember, if your verb or adjective in the stem finishes in a consonant, then you need to attach 으면. In the other hand, if your verbs or adjectives finish in a vowel, then you need to attach simply 면 to its stem.

V/A+(으)면: Conjunction ‘If’.
05:52

In this lesson, you will learn how to use 줄 알다/모르다 in Korean language. This grammatical pattern can be translated into English as ‘know how to do’ or ‘doesn’t know how to do’. So basically, 줄 알다 refers when the speaker know how to do something and 줄 모르다 not to know how to do something.

A/V + 는 줄 알다/모르다: 'Know how to do'/'Do not know how to do'.
04:32

In this lesson, you will learn how to use (으)로 particle in Korean language. (으)로 is a noun particle that means a ‘way’ or ‘method’, it can be also translated as ‘by’ or ‘with’ in English. You can use this participle for expressing a tool or a way that you use something. It can also be translated as ‘to’ or ‘toward’. Remember that 으로 is used after  consonants and 로 is used after vowels. For more details let’s take a look at how it conjugates!

N+(으)로 - 'By', 'To', 'With'; N+(으)로 'By'(a tool), 'To/Towards' (direction).
05:53

In this lesson, you will learn how to use A/V + (으)ㄴ/는지  grammatical structure in Korean language. V + (으)ㄴ/는지 is used to to connect clauses within a sentence, and works in a similar way as English conjunctures how, that, what, whether, and so on. You can use this grammar to ask questions, such as ‘Do you know..?, or express your indecision or hesitation about some fact, such as ‘I don’t know (I am not sure) if..’. Usually, this grammar works with words 알다/모르다, or 궁금하다 (to be curious about).

Note that it conjugates differently with verbs and adjectives: for example 는지 attaches to verbs, when using the Present Tense. However, ㄴ지 attaches to those adjectives ending in a vowel, and 은지 to those ending in a consonant. In the case of nouns, 인지 attaches to all nouns regardless of whether they end in a consonant or a vowel.

N,A/V+(으)L/는지 Conjunctions ‘That, 'What', 'Where', 'When'.
08:59

In this section you can check how well you learn and understand the basic Korean Grammar from Section 3 

Quiz from section 3 (Beginner Korean Grammar - part 2)
19 questions
About the Instructor
Anton Sokolin
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Hello, Everyone!

My name is Anton Sokolin and I am from Russia. Currently, I am studying in South Korea at Dongseo University, Busan. My major is International Studies and minor is International Logistics. I came to Korea 4 year ago and throughout all this time I have been actively learning Korean language. Recently, I obtained TOPIK Level 5 and now I am super excited to share my experience and knowledge of Korean language with everyone who is interested in learning!