Project Management Office: Learn How the PMO Functions

PMOs generally become the source for guidance, documentation, and metrics related to Project Management
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  • Lectures 30
  • Length 1.5 hours
  • Skill Level Intermediate Level
  • Languages English
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About This Course

Published 9/2015 English

Course Description

Based on extensive related hands-on practical experience, this course provides you with the skills and knowledge to effectively and efficiently discover PMO operations needed to provide valuable solutions for business and IT.

Learn How the Project Management Office (PMO) Operate course authored by Chuck Morrison, MBA, PMP with over 25 years Program Management and Business Architecture experience in Silicon Valley California.

The primary goal of a PMO is achievement of benefits of standardizing and following project management policies, processes, and methods. PMOs generally become the source for guidance, documentation, and metrics related to managing practices in implementing projects within the organization. A PMO is often involved in project-related tasks and follow up on project activities from initiation through completion. PMOs report project activities, problems and requirements to executive management as a strategic tool for ensuring implementers and decision makers move toward consistent, business- or mission-aligned goals and objectives.

All affected stakeholders including sponsors, subject matter experts, and other resources must be involved in collaborative development viable solution based on PMO operations and processes for any executive decisions. This requires the leadership, skills, and knowledge or experienced analyst and architects capable of supporting an effective business solution needed to return business systems to proper operation.

Critical processes emphasized during this course are collaboration, listening, analysis, and modeling techniques needed for effective and efficient system operations solutions. This course helps you develop the skills and knowledge needed to support effective solutions and decisions regardless of your role.

If you find my course useful, please consider leaving a review and rating. Your review is much appreciated. You can go directly to the review page for this course then click and enter your review and rating.

Thank You and Best Regards,Chuck Morrison, MBA, PMP

What are the requirements?

  • Some technical experience desired
  • Ability to collaborate and listen for business wants and needs
  • Capability to capture and define business and technical requirements
  • Interest in the fields of business analysis and information architecture
  • Ability to collect and organize tasks, activities and resources into diagrams and graphical models

What am I going to get from this course?

  • Creation and maintenance of standards and methods
  • Centralization of lessons learned archive
  • Project administration support –facilitation of project web site, special meetings, war room, PM software support, and other related support Providing HR and staffing assistance such as identification
  • Project Management consulting and mentoring on methodology, and dealing with exceptions
  • Providing or arranging Project Manager training
  • Managing shared methodology and processes
  • Support for projects, acting as consultants on demand selection of projects contributing with recommendations only to project governance
  • Contributing with recommendations only to project quality assurance
  • Offering support to program and project owners –support those in charge of portfolio management.
  • Enable collaboration of sponsors, users, & stakeholders about system functionality in business language

What is the target audience?

  • Subject Matter Experts (SMEs)
  • Product Owners and Sponsors
  • Business Process Managers
  • Business Process Users
  • Product, Project, and Program Managers
  • Business Analysts & Architects
  • Quality Assurance
  • System & Software Developers

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee.

Forever yours.
Lifetime access.

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android.

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section 1: Learn How the Project Management Office (PMO) Operates …
00:41

Lecture 1 – Welcome to my course “Learn Agile SCRUM Development for Project Managers”

Discussion - Hello, I'm Chuck Morrison, an MBA and PMP certified Senior Program/Projects Manager and Business Architecture Professional.

My specialties are: Business Process Engineering, Software Systems Development, Cross-Functional Program and

Change Management.

My significant skills and accomplishments include:

Over 20 years of expansive and diverse experience as a Program, Project and Portfolio Manager, Consultant and Business Architect/Analyst working for companies such as VMware, HP Enterprise Services, Hawaiian Airlines and DIRECTV.

Proven success in leading multiple, complex projects, process improvements and system migrations throughout the entire project lifecycle that generate cost savings of over $50M.

Managed a total of 27 concurrent, highly visible CPUC Rule 20 projects according to schedule and timeline across multi-locations and sites with a total budget of $40M for Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E).

Extensive technology background with recognized business acumen to define and deliver small to large-scale, complex business process and systems infrastructure projects.

My significant accomplishments also include:

During my youth, I had the good fortune of calling home the awesome forests near Somersworth, New Hampshire, the exciting salmon runs of Adak, Alaska, and the beautiful mountains and beaches of California – from Eureka to Yosemite to San Francisco, Los Angeles, and San Diego. It was also to my good fortune in my learning experience to see and walk in every state in the United States at least once.

Later, it was my good fortune to experience the world on a global scale from the breathtaking beauty and church bells of Frankfurt and Wurzburg Germany. Next, I found myself in experience evening sky of Tokyo, Japan and Mount Fuji for atop Tokyo Tower, followed by the bright red skies of Taipei in Taiwan and Manila Bay in the Philippines, then the busy international harbor of Kowloon near Victoria City, Hong Kong, and the intricate vistas on the Tonkin Gulf near Hai Phong as well as the rugged coastline near Ho Chi Minh City (formerly Saigon) Vietnam, and the exuberant beauty of the Sidney, Australia harbor.

And. Please. If your have any questions about any part of this training or any related questions to this course or Udemy please ask. You have my promise to find you an answer.

02:44

Introduce self to class

Welcome and thank you for joining our course. Please take a moment to introduce yourself to me and the other students in our class using our Udemy Course Discussions to add then post your introduction.

Just include a little information about yourself including your name and location You don't have to be specific about location if you prefer … just include your state or city or country. Also, please let us know where you’re coming from.

Are you working full-time, is this your first time taking or creating and online course, are you working full or part? Is this your first time creating your own online business, or making money online. Do you have a website? If so, please include your website address so we can find out a little more information about you and start following you on your own channel. If you’re on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or other social media, please let us know your contact information if you want to share.

Please contact me with any questions or suggestions you may have about our course.

If during this or any other of my courses, or after you’ve completed any of my courses, you have any questions or related suggestions for improvement; please don’t hesitate to contact me using Udemy’s Instructor Messaging system.

Simply click the Blue “Add Discussion” button then add you information and comments to the dialog box. When finished click the Green “Post” button. That’s it … it’s that easy for communication with me and other student on Udemy.

Remember, you have my promise to work with you to find an answer for your questions and suggestions, which may include course enhancements and/or adjustments or reviews and ratings. I look forward to hearing your comments and suggestions.

And, please after completing any of my courses or if you find this course or any of my courses useful, please consider leaving a review and rating. Your review is much appreciated. You can go directly to the review page for any course then click and enter your review and rating.

I'm excited to meet you and just as I did in my “Welcome” video giving information about myself, I really am excited to get to know you better. Please take just 30 seconds to introduce yourself to the course; I will highly appreciate it. See you in the next video lecture.

Thank You and Best Regards, Chuck

03:27

Lecture 2 – What's a PMO?

•PMO is proven life cycle methodology for minimizing time, cost and risks of delivery of value to customers.

•PMO methodology coordinates enterprise vision, goals, objectives and strategies.

•PMO methodology supports consistent governance of Business- or Mission- implementation and decision-making.

•Centralized coordinated management of portfolios, programs and project within a PMO's domain

Discussion –

PMO's employ standardized, proven life cycle methodology, resources, time, and costs allocated when and where needed to minimize risk or failure to deliver value to customers as promised. The methodology illustrated below starts with the portfolio of projects needed for coordinated optimization modeling of business operations and workflows vital to the success of developing enterprise implementation/deployment of its mission and strategies.

PMO methodology coordinates business operations with enterprise vision through a series of drill-down project phases from visionary requirements and metrics through progressively more detailed models and templates and through due diligence and capture of client requirements and metrics at all levels of business and technical detail. Requirements discovery and capture using IBM RUP UML Use Case, Activity an related visual analysis and modeling ensure right sizing for both project scope and bounds of automation through use of an appropriate PMO methodology.

A Project Management Office (PMO) is organized within a business enterprise defining and maintaining standards for program and project management within an organization. PMO's support “Best Practice” standardization such as the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) guide or Agile Manifesto and introduce economies of project execution scale and repetition within executive and portfolio/program management guidelines. PMOs may also support Rational Unified Process (RUP) and Unified Modeling Language (UML) documentation. A PMO may also serve as the central hub for project documentation, guidance and success metrics within an organization.

The primary goal of a PMO is achievement of client value and benefits using standardization of project management policies, processes, and methods. PMOs generally become the source for guidance, documentation, and metrics related to managing practices in implementing projects within the organization. A PMO is often involved in portfolio/program project-related tasks and follow-up on project activities from initiation through completion and closure of projects. PMOs report project activities, problems and requirements to executive management as a strategic tool ensuring implementers and decision makers achieve consistent, business- or mission-aligned vision, goals, objectives, and strategies.

A PMO is an organizational body or entity assigned various responsibilities related to the centralized and coordinated management of those projects under its domain. The responsibilities of the PMO can range from providing project management support functions to actually being responsible for the direct management of a project.

01:22

Lecture 3 – Imagine …

Discussion -

You and your team are responsible for a major, business system deliveries and were just notified that one of your deliveries crashed and everyone is waiting for your next application delivery.

You're part of a team that must support the company's production control and logistics delivery operation for several critical customers with symptoms you and your team have never seen nor heard of before.

More precisely, customers are beating down your companies doors for must-have immediate delivery of products and services without a page written about processes or procedures and people you've never met who do not know what to do next and you haven't even a clue about what happened, when, or what's the impact on time or resources.

What do you do, where do you begin …

By completing this course, you will posses the set of tools and guidelines needed create your action plan and move forward to resolving business and technical problems and issues using PMO methodology to support project needed to ensure value of product and service delivery to customer with minimal time, costs and risks. So, are you ready to get started?

01:16

Lecture 4 – Please Allow Me to Share a Few Related Quotes …

Discussion –

Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning. – Albert Einstein

Continuous improvement is not about the things you do well — that's work. Continuous improvement is about removing the things that get in the way of your work. The headaches, the things that slow you down, that's what continuous improvement is all about. ~Bruce Hamilton

Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection we can catch excellence. -Vince Lombardi

The first rule of any technology used in a business is that automation applied to an efficient operation will magnify the efficiency. The second is that automation applied to an inefficient operation will magnify the inefficiency. ~Bill Gates

What gets measured, gets managed. ~Peter Drucker

01:23

Lecture 5 – Why Is a PMO Needed? …

Discussion –

Core PMO tasks are typically:

*Managing shared methodology and processes

*Training and competence development

*Offering support for projects, acting as consultants on demand

*Contributing with recommendations only to project governance – selection of projects

*Contributing with recommendations only to project quality assurance, offering support to project owner and support of those in charge of portfolio management.

*Creation and maintenance of standards and methods,

*Centralized archive of lessons learned,

*Project administration support –facilitation of project web site, special meetings, war room, Project Management software support, and other related support,

*Providing HR and staffing assistance such as identification of proper person for the project,

*Project Manager consulting and mentoring on methodology, and dealing with exceptions

*Providing or arranging Project Manager training.

02:37

Lecture 6 – What's This Course About?

Discussion –

Based on extensive related hands-on practical experience, this course provides you with the skills and knowledge to effectively and efficiently discover PMO operations needed to provide valuable solutions for business and IT.

Learn How the Project Management Office (PMO) functions course authored by Chuck Morrison, MBA, PMP with over 25 years Program Management and Business Architecture experience in Silicon Valley California.

The primary goal of a PMO is achievement of benefits of standardizing and following project management policies, processes, and methods. PMOs generally become the source for guidance, documentation, and metrics related to managing practices in implementing projects within the organization. A PMO is often involved in project-related tasks and follow up on project activities from initiation through completion. PMOs report project activities, problems and requirements to executive management as a strategic tool for ensuring implementers and decision makers move toward consistent, business- or mission-aligned goals and objectives.

All affected stakeholders including sponsors, subject matter experts, and other resources must be involved in collaborative development viable solution based on PMO operations and processes for any executive decisions. This requires the leadership, skills, and knowledge or experienced analyst and architects capable of supporting an effective business solution needed to return business systems to proper operation.

Critical processes emphasized during this course are collaboration, listening, analysis, and modeling techniques needed for effective and efficient system operations solutions. This course helps you develop the skills and knowledge needed to support effective solutions and decisions regardless of your role.

If you find my course useful, please consider leaving a review and rating. You review is much appreciated. Your can go directly to the review page for this course then click and enter your review and rating.

Thank You and Best Regards,

Chuck Morrison, MBA, PMP

01:33

Lecture 7 – What's Do You Get from This Course?

Discussion –

*Creation and maintenance of standards and methods

*Centralization of lessons learned archive

*Project administration support –facilitation of project web site, special meetings, war room, PM software support, and other related support Providing HR and staffing assistance such as identification

*Project Management consulting and mentoring on methodology, and dealing with exceptions

*Providing or arranging Project Manager training

*Managing shared methodology and processes

*Support for projects, acting as consultants on demand selection of projects contributing with recommendations only to project governance

*Contributing with recommendations only to project quality assurance

*Offering support to program and project owners –support those in charge of portfolio management.

*Enable collaboration of sponsors, users, & stakeholders about system functionality in business language

Enables identifying, assigning, tracking, controlling, and managing activities based on PMO methodology.

Aids capture & development of portfolio/program/project scope, effort, risk, budget and schedule.

00:35

Lecture 8 – What are the course requirements?

Discussion –

*Some technical experience desired.

*Ability to collaborate and listen for business wants and needs

*Capability to capture and define business and technical requirements

*Interest in the fields of business analysis, information architecture, and related technical professions

*Ability to collect and organize tasks, activities and resources into diagrams and graphical models

00:29

Lecture 9 – Target Audience:

Discussion-

Who should take this course?

  • Subject Matter Experts (SMEs)
  • Product Owners and Sponsors
  • Business Process Managers
  • Business Process Users
  • Product, Project, and Program Managers
  • Business Analysts & Architects
  • Quality Assurance
  • System & Software Developers
Why Is a PMO Needed?
1 question
Section 2: Organizing PMO Functions & Methods within a Domain
02:08

Lecture 10 – What are Supporting PMO Methodology Contexts

Discussion –

PMO Supporting Methodologies –

*Waterfall (SDLC) – Stages/Phase Gates … The waterfall model consists of these 6 phases:

*Requirements Analysis

*System Design

*Implementation

*Testing

*Deployment

*Maintenance

Use Waterfall (SDLC) if most appropriate for clear, fixed, well documented requirements.

*IBM Rational Unified Process (IBM RUP) – Is an Iterative/Incremental process framework created by IBM (since 2013)

Rational Software Corporation. RUP consists of 4 Phases:

*Inception

*Elaboration

*Construction

*Transition

… And these Iterative Development areas:

*Business Modeling

*Requirements

*Analysis & Design

*Implementation

*Test

*Deployment

*Agile SCRUM – See Also … Learn Agile SCRUM Development for Project Managers …

*Scrum is an iterative and incremental (see also IBM RUP) agile software development methodology for managing product development.

01:05

Lecture 11 – “The Swing” … Anonymous – Project Point of View

Discussion –

*How the customer explained it

*How the Project Leader understood it

*How the Analyst designed it

*How the Programmer wrote it

*How the Business Consultant described it

*How the project was documented

*What Operations installed

*How the Customer was billed

*How it was supported

*What the customer needed!

04:14

Lecture 12 – PMO Root – Tasks & Responsibilities

Discussion –

The Project Management discipline is considered to have it's formal origins resulting from Scientific Management theories of Henry Gantt and his famous activities (Gantt) chart being a popular reference. During the 1950s and following, the US military (Admiral Hyman Rickover) and large corporations (IBM, HP, Arthur Anderson, …) developed mathematical models such as PERT (Program Evaluation and Review Technique) and CPM (Critical Path Method). Over time these formal approaches, methods and techniques were adopted for use in Portfolio, Program, and Project Management.

*Managing shared methodology and processes,

*Training and competence development,

*Offering support for projects, acting as consultants on demand,

*Contributing with recommendations only to project governance – selection of projects,

*Contributing with recommendations only to project quality assurance, offering support to project owner and support of those in charge of portfolio management.

PMOs are generally based on project management principles, practices and processes of industry standard methodologies such as PMBOK (Project Management Body of Knowledge) or PRINCE2 (Project in Controlled Environments). These methodologies are consistent with ISO9000 and government regulatory requirements such as Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX).

PMOs are designed and staffed for maximum effectiveness depending on a variety of factors, including vision, goals and objectives, strengths, weaknesses, opportunities & threats (SWOT), and business, technical and cultural imperatives. These represent basic organizational styles for a PMO.

Project Repository: Occurs most often in organizations empowering distributed, business-centric project ownership, or enterprises with weak central governance. The project office serves as an information source for project methodology and standards. Project managers report to, and are funded by, respective business organizations.

Project Coach Model: Assumes sharing project management practices across business functions. Uses the project office to coordinate communication. Best practices are documented and shared; project performance is monitored actively. In this model, a PMO is a permanently staffed organization with some supervisory responsibility for all portfolios, programs, and projects.

Enterprise PMO: Establishes a governance process involving the project office for all projects, enabling assess to scope, resources allocation, scheduling, budget, risk, and impact qualitative and quantitative metrics before undertaking projects. Funding is a combination of direct, budgeted allocation for baseline services and fee-for-service charges.

Practical Considerations –

The PMO is NOT a standalone entity. Strong links exist between PMO goals and objectives and other non-PMO Management functions. Corporate and organizational structures of culture, roles, people skills and available tools are a complex mix to predict and management with certainty such as:

*Potential Resistance to change and New Tensions

*Cost, Value, Impact and Risk of Change.

01:15

Lecture 13 – Waterfall (SDLC) – Stages/Phase Gates

Discussion –

PMO Supporting Methodologies –

*Waterfall (System Development Life Cycle (SDLC)) – Stages/Phase Gates … The waterfall model consists of these 6 phases:

*Requirements Analysis

*System Design

*Implementation

*Testing

*Deployment

*Maintenance

Waterfall (SDLC) if most appropriate for clear, fixed, well documented requirements.

Project Management Templates for Waterfall methodology:

*Project Charter

*Business Requirements

*Technical Design

*Quality Plan

*Test Plan

*Project Schedule

*Risks and Issues Log

*Progress / Status Report

*Lessons Learned

01:31

Lecture 14 – PMO Flow/Stages (Engagement Activities)

Discussion –

Portfolio, Program, Project Activities Flow–

*Portfolio

*Product Requirement Document (PRD)

*High Level Design (HLD)

*Business Requirements Document (BRD)

*Marketing Requirements Document (MRD)

*Document System Requirements (NVB)

*TDSPEC & DDSPEC – Detailed Design Checklists

Project

Requirement(s)

*Workflow

*Business Rule(s)

*Use Case(s)

*Scenario(s) – Personas/Actors

*Test Case(s)

*Infrastructure Attribute(s)

*Test Case(s)

*Make vs Buy

*Function Attribute(s)

*Component Interface Design

*Detailed Solution Design

*Code

00:59

Lecture 15 – IBM Rational Unified Process (IBM RUP)

Discussion –

PMO Supporting Methodologies –

*IBM Rational Unified Process (IBM RUP) – Is an Iterative/Incremental process framework created by IBM (since 2013) Rational Software Corporation. RUP uses the Unified Modeling Language (UML) as it modeling language and consists of 4

Phases:

*Inception

*Elaboration

*Construction

*Transition

… and these Iterative Development areas:

*Business Modeling

*Requirements

*Analysis & Design

*Implementation

*Test

*Deployment

04:38

Lecture 16 - IBM RUP UML Modeling Language

Discussion –

The Core of RUP is the UML Modeling Language (UML) which Coordinates Business Requirements using (Please refer to the Sequence Model above) –

Business Process Workflows/Transformations:

*Patterns such as Model View Controller (MVC)

*Inputs (Information, Resources, Business Rules)

*Outputs (Value/Outcomes, Client Process Inputs) – Deliverables: Product, Service, Result, Exception

*UML Models Business Process Transformations & Sequences of Activities (Workflows)

*Client Roles (also Personas)

*Business Events (also Triggers)

*Business Rules (Flow Control Administration)

*Business Goals (CSF, KPI – Metrics) – Profit, Market share, Cash-flow, ROI, …

Principal UML Methods:

*Use Cases – Scope of Functionality/Policies/Procedures (Stories, Scenarios)

*Sequence, Activities, State

*Class/Data

*Prototype, Construction (Package), Deployment

Analysis and Design

In the RUP methodology, analysis models business functional and technical requirements using industry standard Unified Modeling Language (UML) notation. Use Case models aid examination of alternative scenarios needed to model solutions to specified problems during requirements discovery. Analysis models focus on understanding mission-critical functional concepts and collaborations within a unique business scope and context.

Functional context establishes both project scope and the bounds for automation of your business process and workflows. Resulting models, prototypes, tests and documents are version controlled using a common, secure repository. Models are thus available as the basis for ongoing problem-solving, decision-making, training and maintenance.

Design incorporates concepts and collaborations, from analysis, into visual models used to guide construction and deployment of components and infrastructure needed to meet business requirements. Resulting models, prototypes, tests and documents are version controlled using a common, secure repository. Models are thus available as the basis for ongoing problem-solving, decision-making, training, and maintenance.

Business Modeling

Business Models capture your business vision in form that can be shared, reviewed and monitored over time by you and your team. Business models provide a top-down view of the what, why, who, when, where, and how of your business environment. SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis is performed to help you discover business requirements in terms your customer, competition, supplier, political, and economic environment. Business models encapsulate your sales and marketing, product and service offerings, operations, organization, and financial business realities and requirements that constrain the design and measurement of your business workflows and information technology requirements.

01:35

Lecture 17 – Agile SCRUM – See Also … Learn Agile SCRUM Development for Project Managers …

Discussion –

Scrum is an iterative and incremental (see also IBM RUP) agile software development methodology for managing product development.

This diagram was drawn by me in 2010 to shows complete context of the Accelerated Delivery methods or the Agile Development methodology.

Agile SCRUM

The Agile Scrum focuses on:

*Individuals and interactions over processes and tools

*Working software over comprehensive documentation

*Customer collaboration over contract negotiation

*Responding to change over following a plan

Agile Manifesto based on twelve principles:

*Customer satisfaction by rapid delivery of useful software

*Welcome changing requirements, even late in development

*Working software is delivered frequently (weeks rather than months)

*Working software is the principal measure of progress

*Sustainable development, able to maintain a constant pace

*Close, daily cooperation between business people and developers

*Face-to-face conversation is the best form of communication (co-location)

*Projects are built around motivated individuals, who should be trusted

*Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design

*Simplicity—the art of maximizing the amount of work not done— is essential Self-organizing teams

*Regular adaptation to changing circumstances

AgileScrum.png ©1998-2015 Chuck Morrison, South SF Bay Area & North Central Coast, CA, All rights reserved

05:14

Lecture 18 – What Are Agile Scrum Sprints?

Discussion –

Scrum Sprint Process Elements:

Project Environment

Product Backlog – Prioritized “To Do” list of Project Stories

*Work on items providing most business value with each iteration

*Continue until Product Backlog is empty or time/funding run out

*Client – Customer, Product Owner, Sponsor & Stakeholders

*Analysis

*Project Review

*Iteration Planning

*Work Procedures Review

Fixed Duration Iterations – Typically 2 Weeks

Sprint Backlog - Prioritized “To Do” list of Project Stories

*Information Sharing within Team

*Analysis

*Develop

*Test

*Integrate

Working, Potentially Shippable Product & Deliverables – Completed “To Do”s

Public Presentation (Demo)

*Information Sharing Outside the Team

*Stakeholders – Informed of Progress

Project Management Templates for Agile methodology (Scrum):

*Team structure (Roles and Meetings logistics)

*Product Backlog

*Sprint Backlog

*Burn down chart

The Agile scrum method of software development focuses work on regular, repeatable work cycles or sprint iterations. A standard scrum sprint is 30 days. However, many teams prefer shorter sprints, e.g., one-week, two-weeks, or three-weeks. Sprint duration is a team decision. The team weighs advantages/disadvantages of longer or shorter sprints specific to their development environment. It's important that sprints are of consistent duration.

Teams create shippable product for each sprint, no matter how basic the product. Working within accelerated duration boundaries, teams are only able to build increments of essential functionality. Emphasis on working code motivates the Product Owner to prioritize only essential features for each release. This encourages focus on short-term goals by developers, and provides customers a tangible, empirical view of progress. Each iteration builds incrementally on previous ones. Each release requires many sprints for successful completion. Thus scrums are both “iterative” and “incremental.”

Each sprint starts with a sprint planning meeting. During this meeting the Product Owner meets with the team to plan stories to move from the Product Backlog to the Sprint Backlog. The Product Owner determines stories the team works on. The team decides how work is done. Once the team commits to the work, the Product Owner cannot add work to the Sprint Backlog, change work during a sprint, or micro-manage the team.

Business peer reviews are used to validate steps needed for long, complex stories referred to as epics. Velocity and productivity data point metrics are established to determine story points based on the Fibonacci sequence to ensure minimal procrastination.

*Velocity measures how much functionality a team delivers in a sprint.

*Velocity measures a team's ability to turns ideas into new functionality in a sprint.

During sprints, teams meet for the daily Scrum, also called Daily Stand-up. Sprints are time-boxed meetings providing teams time update project status, discuss solutions to challenges, and provide progress to the Product Owner (who may only observe or answer the team's questions).

As every sprint starts with a sprint planning meeting, sprints conclude with a sprint review meeting. During this meeting team presents work to the Product Owner and the Product Owner decides if the team's work meets acceptable criteria. When a criterion isn't met, work is rejected as incomplete. Work meeting established criteria, by the team is awarded the full number of story points.

Because many sprints are hugely successful and others are not, teams gather after each sprint to share what worked, what didn't, and how processes could be improved. This meeting is referred to as the Sprint Retrospective.

05:12

Lecture 21 – PMO Methodology & Maturity Phases

Discussion –

Six Steps …

*Development of common approach and tools for project management.

*Introduction of governance processes and quality assurance.

*Implementing true project portfolio management.

*Support Project Managers (Templates, Training, …)

*Support Project Owners, Sponsors (Governance)

*Strategic Support to Senior Management

03:29

Lecture 20 – PMO Related Principal Roles & Responsibilities (RACI/RAID/RASCI)

Discussion –

PMO Roles and Responsibilities can be organized, assigned and tracked using a Responsibility(R), Approve(A), Informed(I), Decide(D) (RAID) matrix. Also referred to as Responsible(R), Accountable(A), Support(S), Consulted(C), Informed(I) (RASCI) or Responsible(R), Accountable(A), (Consulted(C), Informed(I) (RACI).

Responsible

People who achieve assigned tasks. At least one participant is assigned to this role. Others are delegated to assist in the work required (see also RASCI below for separately identifying those who participate in a supporting role).

Accountable (also approving authority)

The one ultimately answerable for the correct and thorough completion of the deliverable or task, and the one who delegates the work to those responsible. In other words, an accountable must sign off (approve) work that responsible provides. There must be only one accountable specified for each task or deliverable.

Support

Resources allocated to those responsible in completion of task(s).

Consulted

Knowledgeable people whose opinions are sought out of context (such as influencers) or typically Subject Matter Experts (SMEs).

Informed

People kept up-to-date on program and project(s) progress, often at task or deliverable completion; usually only one-way communication such as in report, summary, or dashboard.

As seen in the Responsibilities Matrix, assignment monitoring and control will also include as needed representative from:

*Sales

*Marketing

*Product Management (PD)

*Enterprise/Business Architecture

*Information Technology (IT)

*User Experience (UE)

*Engineering

*Quality Assurance

*Customer Advocacy

*Finance & Accounting

*Portfolio, Program, Project Management

The Matrix provides monitoring and control tracking of roles assignment through each process group (phases and tasks) of the Portfolio, Program, and Project lifecycle such as provided in the PMI PMBOK Guidelines (discussed in next lecture) …

*ID & Assess (Initiation)

*Analyze & Design (Planning)

*Build/Test (Execution)

*Rollout/Close (Closing)

*Change Management (Post-Closing)

00:59

Lecture 21 – PMO Methodology & Maturity Phases

Discussion –

Six Steps …

*Development of common approach and tools for project management.

*Introduction of governance processes and quality assurance.

*Implementing true project portfolio management.

*Support Project Managers (Templates, Training, …)

*Support Project Owners, Sponsors (Governance)

*Strategic Support to Senior Management

01:31

Lecture 22 – PMO Value to Organization

Discussion –

PMO Value to Organization – APMO's value to an organization is realized through better project performance or through some other project, program or portfolio management objective set by management. Whatever those objectives are, we should link them to specific metrics will indicate how project management practice and project performance change overtime. These metrics may be:

*Project performance: delivering on time.

*Project performance: delivering in budget.

*Project performance: delivering all agreed products or services.

*Customer satisfaction: product or service meeting customer expectations.

*Combination of various metrics in a Balanced Scorecard

Other benefits more related to processes and strategic considerations –

*Standardization of operations; efficient and effective operations.

*Better resource allocation, capacity planning.

*Quicker access to higher quality project information (progress, risks)

*More realistic prioritization of work

*Company rather than silo decision-making

What are the 3 three supporting methodologies to PMO?
1 question
Section 3: CSF and Critical Roles for PMO in SCRUM
01:12

Lecture 23 – Critical PMO Success Factors

Discussion –

*Design the PMO (centralized, decentralized, virtual) based on the objectives.

*Cover the true needs of the organization, as identified from the PMO stakeholders.

*Ensure top management support.

*PMO services should be free of charge to the projects.

*Do not develop the PMO into a bureaucratic control unit.

*Resource the PMO with experienced senior Project Managers with broad skills.

*Focus on improved project management practices.

*Allow the PMO to progress at the right speed, starting at core needs (methods and tools) and only moving to Governance and Portfolio Management when the organization maturity is higher and Senior Management sees value in the PMO assisting in those other functions.

01:08

Lecture 24 – PMO SCRUM Role Challenge

Discussion –

A project management office (PMO) engaged in and supportive of transitioning to Scrum can be a tremendous boon. Members of the PMO often view themselves as protectors and supporters of best practices, so PMOs can help implement and spread agile project management across the organization. However, when the PMO's improperly involved, this can generate resistance while defending the current processes, rather than working toward continuous improvement.

Typical response from people in a PMO is resisting transition to Scrum. Change is both personally and professionally intimidating. Scrum spreads traditional project management responsibilities among the Scrum Master, product owner, and the team, leaving project managers questioning their role. The absence of a PMO in most Scrum and agile literature adds to natural concerns of PMO members.

02:39

Lecture 25 – SCRUM Transition – PMO and People

Discussion –

The Project Management Office and People

Referred to as project management office, PMOs has tremendous influence over people involved in Scrum transition. An agile PMO provides:

Develop a training program. There is much to adopting Scrum that will be new and unfamiliar to many team members. The PMO can be of tremendous assistance in putting together a training program, selecting outside trainers to deliver the training, or delivering the training themselves.

Provide coaching. Beyond training people, individual and small-group coaching is incredibly helpful. In a training class, the instructor says, “Here's how to do a sprint planning meeting,” for example, and perhaps runs the class through an exercise to practice it. With coaching, someone with deep experience sits with the team and helps team members through their own real sprint planning meeting (or whatever skill is being coached). Early on, members of the PMO might not have these skills themselves, but they should focus on acquiring them from outside coaches and then do the hands-on coaching themselves.

Select and train coaches. A successful Scrum initiative will eventually lead to more coaching needs than the PMO can manage on its own. Members of the PMO should identify and develop coaches by watching the scrum teams they help and then providing training or assistance to help selected individuals become skilled coaches. These coaches usually retain their current jobs but are given additional responsibilities, such as spending up to five hours per week helping a specific team.

Challenge existing behaviors. When the organization begins to adopt Scrum, the members of the PMO look for scrum teams who are falling back into old habits or whose old habits are preventing them from becoming agile. Later, members of the Project Management Office can remind teams that Scrum is about continuous improvement and can help prevent the onset of complacency.

06:06

Lecture 26 – PMO & Processes/Projects

Discussion –

The Project Management Office and Projects

Although some project-oriented responsibilities end with change to agile PMO, others remain, including:

Assist with reporting. PMOs usually conduct meetings or weekly status reports for each project including the department head. This meeting is attended by appropriate project personnel, such as the product owner or Scrum Master. If it is a weekly, The PMO can assist in preparing these reports.

Assist with compliance needs. Many projects must comply with standards such as ISO 9001 or Sarbanes-Oxley or with organization-specific rules, such as data security. An agile PMO often assist teams with awareness of these requirements, advising on compliance, and as a clearinghouse through shared knowledge on compliance.

Manage the inflow of new projects. One of the most important responsibilities of an agile PMO is to assist in managing the rate at which new projects flow into the development organization. As described in chapter 10 of Succeeding with Agile, it is important to limit work to capacity. Otherwise, work piles up, leading to a litany of problems. For each project completed, a new project of the same size can be started. The agile PMO can serve as gatekeeper and help the organization resist the temptation to start projects too quickly.

The Project Management Office and Process

As keepers of the process, members of the PMO will work closely with the organization's Scrum Masters to make sure Scrum is implemented as well as it can be. These process-related activities include the following:

Assist in establishing and collecting metrics. PMOs identify and collect metrics. Metrics programs concern Scrum teams as used traditional teams. PMOs should proceed cautiously. An agile PMO collects information about team performance in delivering value.

Reduce waste. PMO should aggressively support the team in methods for elimination of wasteful activities and artifacts from the process. Agile PMO avoid introducing documents, meetings, approvals unless absolutely necessary. PMOs also help find methods for adding value through continuous process improvement .

Help establish and support communities of practice. A community of practice is a group of liked-minded or like-skilled individuals. An important activity for agile PMO encouraging formation of communities then supporting them once initiated. Not only do communities of practice the spread of Scrum throughout and organization, good ideas are also spread from one team to another.

Create an appropriate amount of consistency across teams. Scrum teams, are offended by consistency enforced through dictate (structured Best Practice). Consistency across teams is enforced when team agree through collaboration and consensus a particular practice is an acceptable idea. Agile PMOs facilitate by ensuring good ideas spread rapidly among teams. Two practices used are communities of practice and shared coaches.

Provide and maintain tools. Generally, tool decisions left to teams whenever possible. On occasion, a community of practice may decide on sufficient benefits from choosing a single tool for all projects. Tool decisions are often made by PMOs, although extremely rarely. An agile PMO assists teams by acquiring appropriate tools and performing configurations or customizations as necessary.

Coordinate teams. PMO members are vital in coordinating work among separate teams. A PMO representative often is first to notice when work of two teams begins become a dependency and diverges or overlaps. PMO members provide value to teams by alerting teams about situations as these occur.

Model the use of Scrum. Through intensive exposure to Scrum, agile PMOs realize Scrum's general-purpose usefulness as a project management framework. Many PMOs choose to use Scrum methods to manage the PMO planning monthly sprints, conducting daily scrums, as other Scrum teams.

Work with other groups. PMOs assist to teams by working with other business groups, especially human resources and facilities. A PMO explains to facilities negative impact separating a team over multiple floors or buildings or having programmers and testers from the same team in separate locations. PMOs work with human resources to remove questions that discourage teamwork from the annual review process.

Section 4: Conclusion
02:08

Lecture 27 – Learn How the Project Management Office (PMO) Functions – Conclusion

Discussion –

You've made it! …. you've completed all Course Goals …

Course Goals

*Creation and maintenance of standards and methods

*Centralization of lessons learned archive

*Project administration support –facilitation of project web site, special meetings, war room, PM software support, and other related support Providing HR and staffing assistance such as identification

*Project Management consulting and mentoring on methodology, and dealing with exceptions

*Providing or arranging Project Manager training

*Managing shared methodology and processes

*Support for projects, acting as consultants on demand selection of projects contributing with recommendations only to project governance

*Contributing with recommendations only to project quality assurance

*Offering support to program and project owners –support those in charge of portfolio management.

*Enable collaboration of sponsors, users, & stakeholders about system functionality in business language

Thank you and congratulations for taking this opportunity for yourself to expand your skills and knowledge. Thank you for your decision to complete this course successfully.

And, please, if your have any questions about any part of this training or any related questions to this course or Udemy please ask. You have my promise to find you an answer.

If you found my course useful, please consider leaving a review and rating. Your review is much appreciated. You can go directly to the review page for this course then click and enter your review and rating.

Thank You and Best Regards, Chuck Morrison, MBA, PMP

http://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckmorrison

http://www.chuckmorrison.com

11 pages

Lecture 28 – Glossary …

For definitions of terms used in this course, please see downloadable Glossary.pdf

2 pages

Lecture 29 – For Further Reading …

OO UML developed by “The 3 Amigos” Grady Booch, Ivar Jacobson and James Rumbaugh at Rational Software during 1994–95 with further development led by them through 1996. … Rational Software transferred to IBM … OO UML accepted by OMG & ISO

References:

A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide) Fourth Edition, Project Management Institute, 2008

A Guide to the Business Analysis Body of Knowledge® (BABOK® Guide), 2ed, International Institute of Business Analysis, 2009

A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide) Fourth Edition, Project Management Institute, 2008

Advanced Use Case Modeling: Software Systems (v. 1), Frank Amour, Addison Wesley, 2001

Getting It Right: Business Requirement Analysis Tools and Techniques, Kathleen B. Hass, Management Concepts, 2007

Mastering the Requirements Process (2nd Edition), Suzanne Robertson, et al, Addison-Wesley, 2006

Object-Oriented Analysis and Design with Applications (3rd Edition), Grady Booch, Addison-Wesley, 2007

Patterns for Effective Use Cases (The Agile Software Development Series), Alistair Cockburn, et al, Addison-Wesley, 2002

Practice Standard for Work Breakdown Structures, 2ed, Project Management Institute, 2006

Professionalizing Business Analysis: Breaking the Cycle of Challenged Projects, Kathleen B. Hass, Management Concepts, 2007

Seven Steps to Mastering Business Analysis, Barbara A. Carkenord, J. Ross Publishing, 2008

The Art and Power of Facilitation: Running Powerful Meetings, Kathleen Hass, Management Concepts, 2007

The Business Analyst as Strategist: Translating Business Strategies into Valuable Solutions, Kathleen Hass, Management Concepts, 2007

The Elements of UML(TM) 2.0 Style, Scott Ambler, Cambridge University Press, 2005

The Unified Software Development Process, Ivar Jacobson, et al, Addison-Wesley, 1999

The Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual (2nd Edition) (The Addison-Wesley Object Technology Series), James Rumbaugh, et al, Addison-Wesley, 2004

Unified Modeling Language User Guide, The (2nd Edition), Grady Booch, et al, Addison-Wesley, 2005

UML Distilled: A Brief Guide to the Standard Object Modeling Language (3rd Edition), Martin Fowler, Addison-Wesley, 2003

UML 2 and the Unified Process: Practical Object-Oriented Analysis and Design (2nd Edition), Jim Arlow, et al, Addison-Wesley, 2005

Unearthing Business Requirements: Elicitation Tools and Techniques, Kathleen Hass, Management Concepts, 2007

What Not How: The Business Rules Approach to Application Development, C. J. Date, Addison-Wesley Professional, 2000

Writing Effective Use Cases, Alistair Cockburn, Addison-Wesley, 2000

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Instructor Biography

Chuck Morrison, Program/Project Manager & Business/IT Architect (MBA, PMP)

“A working model using mission-driven measures in a team approach enables focus on profitable customer-driven solutions."

With extensive Program Management and Business Architecture experience in Silicon Valley California it's been my good fortune and opportunity to experience working with many Fortune 500 companies. Workflow modeling is my expertise, joy and passion. As a seasoned professional my enjoyment is using and sharing the skills and knowledge with others through teaching and writing. Chuck has also authored and published other Udemy courses, Amazon eBooks, Linked SlideShare, and YouTube videos.

PMI PMP certified: Principal Strategist, Architect, and Leader with MBA and extensive experience in business and technology consulting, planning, designing, mentoring, negotiating, and delivering project, product, program, and process solutions. Successful track record planning, managing, and leading small to multi-site, concurrent, complex cross-functional projects and portfolios requiring business process engineering, Internet and information technology, quality management, instrumentation, and training.

Specialties: -Programs/Projects Management (PMI PMP): Program, Product, Project, and Process (SDLC, Agile, PMBOK, DMAIC, RUP, ITIL, InfoSec, NetSec, CISSP)-Business/Technical Process/Systems Modeling, Analysis, and Design (UML, OOA/D, BRD, MRD, FRD, HLD, ERD)-Web Portal Planning, Design, Documentation, and QA (Web 2.0, HTML, TCP/IP, HTTP, B2B, B2C)-Client/Team-Focused Consultant, Mentor, and Communicator-Inventory/Supply Chain Modeling/Management (APICS CPIM)

Thank You and Best Regards,
Chuck Morrison, MBA, PMP, CPIM, WWISA

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