Agile SCRUM: Learn Agile Development for Project Managers

The Agile approach maintains focus on the rapid business value delivery.
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  • Lectures 26
  • Length 1 hour
  • Skill Level Intermediate Level
  • Languages English
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About This Course

Published 8/2015 English

Course Description

Based on extensive related hands-on practical experience, this course provides you with the skills and knowledge to effectively and efficiently discover skills and knowledge needed to provide valuable solutions for business and IT.

Learn Agile SCRUM Development for Project Managers course authored by Chuck Morrison, MBA, PMP with over 25 years Program Management and Business Architecture experience in Silicon Valley California.

Agile development offers a lightweight framework for supporting teams given constantly evolving functional and technical landscape.

The Agile approach maintains focus on the rapid business value delivery. The result is organization teams with significant overall risk reduction associated with traditional software development. Agile development accelerates delivery of required business value. Through a process of continuous planning and feedback value is continuously maximized throughout the development process.

All affected stakeholders including sponsors, subject matter experts, and other resources must be involved in collaborative development viable solution based on Agile Methodology and Methods for any executive decisions. This requires the leadership, skills, and knowledge or experienced analyst and architects capable of supporting an effective business solution needed to return business systems to proper operation.

Critical processes emphasized during this course are collaboration, listening, analysis, and modeling techniques needed for effective and efficient system operations solutions. This course helps you develop the skills and knowledge needed to support effective solutions and decisions regardless of your role.

If you find my course useful, please consider leaving a review and rating. Your review is much appreciated. You can go directly to the review page for this course then click and enter your review and rating.

Thank You and Best Regards,

Chuck Morrison, MBA, PMP

What are the requirements?

  • Some technical experience desired.
  • Ability to collaborate and listen for business wants and needs
  • Capability to capture and define business and technical requirements
  • Interest in the fields of business analysis and information architecture
  • Ability to collect and organize tasks, activities and resources into diagrams and graphical models

What am I going to get from this course?

  • Learn the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats among various methodologies including RUP, SDLC, Agile Scrum
  • Learn to discover and develop the scope and value of accelerated project deliverables
  • Learn the critical focus points of the Agile Manifesto and key roles of Agile Scrum
  • Document and manage Business system, Stakeholder, Functional, Non-Functional, and data requirements
  • Capture and clarify Business Rules and External Constraints that mandate limits to the delivered solution
  • Develop measurable Solution Requirements and velocity for facilitation of End-User Acceptance Testing and working software delivery
  • Enable collaboration of sponsors, users, & stakeholders about system functionality in business language.
  • Learn to determine work items providing most business value for each product backlog grooming to sprint story iterations

What is the target audience?

  • Subject Matter Experts (SMEs)
  • Product Owners and Sponsors
  • Business Process Managers
  • Business Process Users
  • Product, Project, and Program Managers
  • Business Analysts & Architects
  • Quality Assurance
  • System & Software Developers

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee.

Forever yours.
Lifetime access.

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android.

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section 1: Why Is Agile Scrum Needed?
00:41

Hello, I'm Chuck Morrison, an MBA and PMP certified Senior Program/Projects Manager and Business Architecture Professional.

My specialties are: Business Process Engineering, Software Systems Development, Cross-Functional Program and Change Management.

My significant skills and accomplishments include:

  • Over 20 years of expansive and diverse experience as a Program, Project and Portfolio Manager, Consultant and Business Architect/Analyst working for companies such as VMware, HP Enterprise Services, Hawaiian Airlines and DIRECTV.
  • Proven success in leading multiple, complex projects, process improvements and system migrations throughout the entire project lifecycle that generate cost savings of over $50M.
  • Managed a total of 27 concurrent, highly visible CPUC Rule 20 projects according to schedule and timeline across multi-locations and sites with a total budget of $40M for Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E).
  • Extensive technology background with recognized business acumen to define and deliver small to large-scale, complex business process and systems infrastructure projects.


My significant accomplishments also include:

During my youth, I had the good fortune of calling home the awesome forests near Somersworth, New Hampshire, the exciting salmon runs of Adak, Alaska, and the beautiful mountains and beaches of California – from Eureka to Yosemite to San Francisco, Los Angeles, and San Diego. It was also to my good fortune in my learning experience to see and walk in every state in the United States at least once.

Later, it was my good fortune to experience the world on a global scale from the breathtaking beauty and church bells of Frankfurt and Wurzburg Germany. Next, I found myself experiencing evening sky of Tokyo, Japan and Mount Fuji from atop Tokyo Tower, followed by the bright red sunset skies of Taipei in Taiwan and Manila Bay in the Philippines, then the busy international harbor of Kowloon near Victoria City, Hong Kong, and the intricate vistas on the Tonkin Gulf near Hai Phong as well as the rugged coastline near Ho Chi Minh City (formerly Saigon) Vietnam, and the exuberant beauty of the Sidney, Australia harbor.

And. Please. If your have any questions about any part of this training or any related questions to this course or Udemy please ask. You have my promise to find you an answer.

© 2015 Chuck Morrison, All Rights Reserved

02:44

Introduce self to class

Welcome and thank you for joining our course. Please take a moment to introduce yourself to me and the other students in our class using our Udemy Course Discussions to add then post your introduction.

Just include a little information about yourself including your name and location You don't have to be specific about location if you prefer … just include your state or city or country. Also, please let us know where you’re coming from.

Are you working full-time, is this your first time taking or creating and online course, are you working full or part? Is this your first time creating your own online business, or making money online. Do you have a website? If so, please include your website address so we can find out a little more information about you and start following you on your own channel. If you’re on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or other social media, please let us know your contact information if you want to share.

Please contact me with any questions or suggestions you may have about our course.

If during this or any other of my courses, or after you’ve completed any of my courses, you have any questions or related suggestions for improvement; please don’t hesitate to contact me using Udemy’s Instructor Messaging system.

Simply click the Blue “Add Discussion” button then add you information and comments to the dialog box. When finished click the Green “Post” button. That’s it … it’s that easy for communication with me and other student on Udemy.

Remember, you have my promise to work with you to find an answer for your questions and suggestions, which may include course enhancements and/or adjustments or reviews and ratings. I look forward to hearing your comments and suggestions.

And, please after completing any of my courses or if you find this course or any of my courses useful, please consider leaving a review and rating. Your review is much appreciated. You can go directly to the review page for any course then click and enter your review and rating.

I'm excited to meet you and just as I did in my “Welcome” video giving information about myself, I really am excited to get to know you better. Please take just 30 seconds to introduce yourself to the course; I will highly appreciate it. See you in the next video lecture.

Thank You and Best Regards, Chuck

02:01

Agile methods and methodology are based on real-life project experience of software professionals. Their experiences from the challenges and limitations using traditional waterfall development project after project led to the Agile manifesto and development adaptability. The Agile approach is a direct response to the issues associated with traditional software development and is a general philosophy supporting specific project processes and methods.

Agile development offers a lightweight framework for supporting teams given constantly evolving functional and technical landscape. The Agile approach maintains focus on the rapid business value delivery. The result is organization teams with significant overall risk reduction associated with traditional software development.

Agile development accelerates delivery of required business value. Through a process of continuous planning and feedback value is continuously maximized throughout the development process. A result of an iterative planning and feedback loop is teams continuously align delivered software with required business needs. Teams easily adapt to changing requirements throughout the process. By measuring and evaluating status based on the critical performance metrics and requirements traceable testing, accurate visibility into actual progress of projects is now available. Finally, a key result of the agile process is completion of projects ensuring software systems addressing required business value and customer needs.

01:24

Lecture 3 – Imagine …

Discussion -

•You and your team are responsible for a major, business system deliveries and were just notified that one of your deliveries crashed and everyone is waiting for your next application delivery.

•You're part of a team that must support the company's production control and logistics delivery operation for several critical customers with symptoms you and your team have never seen nor heard of before.

•More precisely, customers are beating down your companies doors for must-have immediate delivery of products and services without a page written about processes or procedures and people you've never met who do not know what to do next and you haven't even a clue about what happened, when, or what's the impact on time or resources.

•What do you do, where do you begin …

By completing this course, you will posses the set of tools and guidelines needed create your action plan and move forward to resolving business and technical problems and issues using Agile Scrum methodology and methods for accelerated delivery of business applications and products. So, are you ready to get started?

01:17

Lecture 4 – Please Allow Me to Share a Few Related Quotes …

Discussion –

•Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning. – Albert Einstein

•Continuous improvement is not about the things you do well — that's work. Continuous improvement is about removing the things that get in the way of your work. The headaches, the things that slow you down, that's what continuous improvement is all about. ~Bruce Hamilton

•Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection we can catch excellence. -Vince Lombardi

•The first rule of any technology used in a business is that automation applied to an efficient operation will magnify the efficiency. The second is that automation applied to an inefficient operation will magnify the inefficiency. ~Bill Gates

•What gets measured, gets managed. ~Peter Drucker

00:46

Lecture 5 – Why Is Agile Scrum Needed? …

Discussion –

•Agile means being able to quickly change direction.

•Time and money are not wasted building products & services no one wants or won't pay for.

•Creation of product and services with minimum set of features providing required value to clients, allowing concept test and feedback before continuing development.

•Scrum processes are clear about producing visible value as working software on a regular basis.

•Iterative incremental product and service delivery (sprints) maximizes opportunity for frequent client feedback and ROI.

02:09

Lecture 6 – What's This Course About?

Discussion –

Based on over 45 years of related hands-on practical experience, this course provides you with the skills and knowledge to effectively and efficiently discover Agile opportunities needed to provide valuable solutions for business and IT.

Learn Agile SCRUM Development for Project Managers course authored by Chuck Morrison, MBA, PMP with over 25 years Program Management and Business Architecture experience in Silicon Valley California.

Agile development offers a lightweight framework for supporting teams given constantly evolving functional and technical landscape.

The Agile approach maintains focus on the rapid business value delivery. The result is organization teams with significant overall risk reduction associated with traditional software development. Agile development accelerates delivery of required business value. Through a process of continuous planning and feedback value is continuously maximized throughout the development process.

All affected stakeholders including sponsors, subject matter experts, and other resources must be involved in collaborative development viable solution based on Agile Methodology and Methods for any executive decisions. This requires the leadership, skills, and knowledge or experienced analyst and architects capable of supporting an effective business solution needed to return business systems to proper operation.

Critical processes emphasized during this course are collaboration, listening, analysis, and modeling techniques needed for effective and efficient system operations solutions. This course helps you develop the skills and knowledge needed to support effective solutions and decisions regardless of your role.

If you find my course useful, please consider leaving a review and rating. You review is much appreciated. You can go directly to the review page for this course then click and enter your review and rating.

Thank You and Best Regards,

Chuck Morrison, MBA, PMP

01:47

Lecture 7 – What's Do You Get from This Course?

Discussion –

•Learn to discover and develop the scope and value of accelerated project deliverables

•Learn the critical focus points of the Agile Manifesto and key roles of Agile Scrum

•Learn the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats among various methodologies including RUP, SDLC, Agile Scrum

•Learn to determine determine work items providing most business value for each product backlog grooming to sprint story iterations

•Learn the focus of Daily Standups, Backlog Grooming, Scrum of Scrums, Planning Meeting, Review Meeting, and Retrospective

•Document and manage Business system, Stakeholder, Functional, Non-Functional, and data requirements

•Capture and clarify Business Rules and External Constraints that mandate limits to the delivered solution

•Develop measurable Solution Requirements and velocity for facilitation of End-User Acceptance Testing and working software delivery

•Enable collaboration of sponsors, users, & stakeholders about system functionality in business language.

Enables identifying, assigning, tracking, controlling, and managing Logical Troubleshooting and Root Cause Analysis (RCA) activities.

Aids capture & development of program/project scope, effort, budget and schedule.

00:33

Lecture 8 – What are the course requirements?

Discussion –

•Some technical experience desired.

•Ability to collaborate and listen for business wants and needs

•Capability to capture and define business and technical requirements

•Interest in the fields of business analysis and information architecture

•Ability to collect and organize tasks, activities and resources into diagrams and graphical models

00:19

Lecture 9 – Who's the Target Audience?

Discussion –

•Subject Matter Experts (SMEs)

•Product Owners

•Business Process Managers

•Business Process Users

•Product, Project, and Program Managers

•Business Analysts & Architects

•Quality Assurance

•System & Software Developers

Why Is Agile Scrum Needed?
1 question
Section 2: Reducing Chaos Using Agile Scrum Methodology
03:16

Agile methods and methodology are based on real-life project experience of software professionals. Their experiences from the challenges and limitations using traditional waterfall development project after project led to the Agile manifesto and an development adaptability. The Agile approach is a direct response to the issues associated with traditional software development and is a general philosophy supporting specific project processes and methods.

Agile development offers a lightweight framework for supporting teams given constantly evolving functional and technical landscape. The Agile approach maintains focus on the rapid business value delivery. The result is organization teams with significant overall risk reduction associated with traditional software development.

Agile development accelerates delivery of required business value. Through a process of continuous planning and feedback value is continuously maximized throughout the development process. A result of an iterative planning and feedback loop is teams continuously align delivered software with required business needs. Teams easily adapt to changing requirements throughout the process. By measuring and evaluating status based on the critical performance metrics and requirements traceable testing, accurate visibility into actual progress of projects is now available. Finally, a key result of the agile process is completion of projects ensuring software systems addressing required business value and customer needs.

The following diagram displays key elements of the Agile Development methodology resulting in Accelerated Delivery. By delivering working, tested, deployable software on an incremental basis, agile development delivers increased value, visibility, and adaptability much earlier in the life cycle, significantly reducing project risk.

01:36

Lecture 11 – What's Accelerated Delivery

This diagram was drawn by me in 2010 to show complete context of the Accelerated Delivery methods or the Agile Development methodology.

Agile Manefesto

The Agile Manifesto focuses on:

•Individuals and interactions over processes and tools

•Working software over comprehensive documentation

•Customer collaboration over contract negotiation

•Responding to change over following a plan


Agile Manifesto based on twelve principles:

•Customer satisfaction by rapid delivery of useful software

•Welcome changing requirements, even late in development

•Working software is delivered frequently (weeks rather than months) Working software is the principal measure of progress

•Sustainable development, able to maintain a constant pace

•Close, daily cooperation between business people and developers

•Face-to-face conversation is the best form of communication (co-location)

•Projects are built around motivated individuals, who should be trusted

•Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design

•Simplicity—the art of maximizing the amount of work not done—is essential Self-organizing teams

•Regular adaptation to changing circumstances

AgileScrum.png ©1998-2015 Chuck Morrison, South SF Bay Area & North Central Coast, CA, All rights reserved

02:54

Lecture 12 – Agile Iterative/Incremental Development

Agile means being able to quickly change direction. In software development, it requires strong discipline to code for agility. It includes writing tests for functionality before coding. It calls for naming of functionality to exactly match the intent and the terminology of the problem domain. It demands cessation of coding when the tests pass.


The sum total of all the disciplines delivers an ability to change direction quickly. New and unexpected functionality required to cope with a sudden change in the business landscape can be inserted in existing code using test-driven development and all the previous tests will pass or fail to instantly indicate where code needs to be refactored to stay functional.


If functionality is added before it is required then it becomes “dead weight” when refactoring is called for. Iterative and Incremental development is a cyclic software development process developed in response to the weaknesses of the waterfall model. It is an essential part of the Rational Unified Process, the Dynamic Systems Development Method, Extreme Programming and generally the agile software development frameworks. RUP: Inception, Elaboration, Construction, Transition


Business Process Modeling Planning Framework

•Proposal

•Problem Definition

•Solution – Complexity, Risk, Effort, Priority

•Project – Requirements: Objectives, Current Status, Type, Strategic Management, Size, Risk, Complexity

•Process – Waterfall (SDLC), RUP, Agile: Deliverables, Methodology, Standards, Techniques

•Project Assignment (Role): Problem Definition, Project

•People – Responsibility, Stakeholder Analysis, Communication Strategies

•Work Plan (Type) – Requirement, Task List (WBS), Estimates

05:27

Lecture 13 – What Are Scrum Sprints?

Scrum Sprint Process Elements:

•Project Environment

•Product Backlog – Prioritized “To Do” list of Project Stories

•Work on items providing most business value with each iteration

•Continue until Product Backlog is empty or time/funding run out

•Client – Customer, Product Owner, Sponsor & Stakeholders

•Analysis

•Project Review

•Iteration Planning

•Work Procedures Review

•Fixed Duration Iterations – Typically 2 Weeks

•Sprint Backlog - Prioritized “To Do” list of Project Stories

•Information Sharing within Team

•Analysis

•Develop

•Test

•Integrate

•Working, Potentially Shippable Product & Deliverables – Completed “To Do”s

•Public Presentation (Demo)

•Information Sharing Outside the Team

•Stakeholders – Informed of Progress

The Agile scrum method of software development focuses work on regular, repeatable work cycles or sprint iterations. A standard scrum sprint is 30 days. However, many teams prefer shorter sprints, e.g., one-week, two-weeks, or three-weeks. Sprint duration is a team decision. The team weighs advantages/disadvantages of longer or shorter sprints specific to their development environment. It's important that sprints are of consistent duration.

Teams create shippable product for each sprint, no matter how basic the product. Working within accelerated duration boundaries, teams are only able to build increments of essential functionality. Emphasis on working code motivates the Product Owner to prioritize only essential features for each release. This encourages focus on short-term goals by developers, and provides customers a tangible, empirical view of progress. Each iteration builds incrementally on previous ones. Each release requires many sprints for successful completion. Thus scrums are both “iterative” and “incremental.”

Each sprint starts with a sprint planning meeting. During this meeting the Product Owner meets with the team to plan stories to move from the Product Backlog to the Sprint Backlog. The Product Owner determines stories the team works on. The team decides how work is done. Once the team commits to the work, the Product Owner cannot add work to the Sprint Backlog, change work during a sprint, or micro-manage the team.

Business peer reviews are used to validate steps needed for long, complex stories referred to as epics. Velocity and productivity data point metrics are established to determine story points based on the Fibonacci sequence to ensure minimal procrastination.

•Velocity measures how much functionality a team delivers in a sprint.

•Velocity measures a team's ability to turns ideas into new functionality in a sprint.

During sprints, teams meet for the daily Scrum, also called Daily Stand-up. Sprints are time-boxed meetings providing teams time update project status, discuss solutions to challenges, and provide progress to the Product Owner (who may only observe or answer the team's questions).

As every sprint starts with a sprint planning meeting, sprints conclude with a sprint review meeting. During this meeting team presents work to the Product Owner and the Product Owner decides if the team's work meets acceptable criteria. When a criterion isn't met, work is rejected as incomplete. Work meeting established criteria, by the team is awarded the full number of story points.

Because many sprints are hugely successful and others are not, teams gather after each sprint to share what worked, what didn't, and how processes could be improved. This meeting is referred to as the Sprint Retrospective.

03:08

Lecture 14 – What Are the Core Roles for Agile Scrum?


Core roles are project commitments in the Scrum process—these roles are used to produce products based on the project scope and objectives; these roles represent scrum team member responsibilities.

Product Owner - The Product Owner Captures the 'who', 'what' and 'why' of each project requirement based on project stories. The Product Owner represents stakeholders and voice of the customer. This project role is accountable for ensuring the team delivers expected value to the business. Product Owners write a customer-centric item referred to as user stories, prioritizes these items, and adds these items to the product backlog. There is normally only one Product Owner per scrum team. Whereas a Product Owner may also be a development team member, it's recommended the role of Scrum Master not be combined with the role of Product Owner.

Development Team - Delivery of potentially shippable product increments for each Sprint is the responsibility of a Development Team. Development Teams normally consist of 3–9 members with cross-functional skills and responsibility for successful work (e.g., analyze, design, develop, test, technical communication, documentation, training). Development Team Scrums are self-organizing, even when interfacing with project management organizations including Waterfall, RUP, PMBOK, and PMOs.

Scrum Master - Scrums are facilitated by Scrum Masters (ScrumMaster). Scrum Masters are accountable for removing roadblocks (impediments) of the Development Team's delivery of sprint objectives or deliverables. Scrum Masters are not team leaders. Scrum Masters act as buffers among the team, dependencies, and distracting affects. Scrum Masters ensure the Scrum process is used properly and effectively. Scrum Masters enforce project rules. The Scrum Master's roles ensure protection of the Development Team and ensure its focus on sprint objectives, tasks, and deliverables. The Scrum Master role is often referred to as servant-leader as reinforcement of the roles dual perspectives. The Scrum Master's role differs from the Project Manager's in that the latter may also have people management responsibilities. The Scrum Master role excludes people management responsibilities.

00:45

Lecture 15 – What are Agile Scrum Ancillary Roles?

Scrum teams Ancillary roles have no formal role with infrequent Scrum process involvement; nonetheless, ancillary roles must be account for.

Stakeholders - Stakeholders are sponsors, subject matter experts (SMEs), users, clients/customers, and vendors. Stakeholders enable the projects and are people for whom projects produce agreed-upon benefits justifying a projects objectives, deliverables, and budget. Stakeholders are directly involved in the project's process only during Sprint Reviews.

Managers - Managers such as sponsors, stakeholders, and customers control a project's scope and environment.

02:33

Lecture 16 – The Scrum Task Board

Story: (Product Backlog) The story description (“As a user we want to…”) shown on that row.

(Tasks) To Do: Place for all cards that are not in the “Done” or “In Process” columns for the current sprint.

Work In Process (Burn-down Chart): Any card being worked on goes here. The programmer who chooses to work on it moves it over when she's ready to start the task. Often this happens during the Daily Scrum when someone says, “I'm going to work on the story today.”

To Verify (Testing): A lot of tasks have corresponding test task cards. So, if there's a “Code the story class” card, there is likely one or more task cards related to testing: “Test the project”, “Write case tests for the story,” “Write case fixture for the story,” etc. Some task cards don't often get corresponding test cards (“Fix Bug #321 in Bugzilla” or JIRA) so those are placed in the “To Verify” column.

Done (Sprint End): Cards pile up over here when they're done. They're removed at the end of the sprint. Sometimes we remove some or all during a sprint if there are a lot of cards.

Optionally, depending on the team, culture, project, and other consideration, these columns can be used on a scrum task board:

  • Notes: Just a place to jot a note or two.
  • Tests Specified: We like to do “Story Test-Driven Development,” of “Acceptance Test-Driven Development,” which
means the tests are written before the story is coded. Many teams find that it helps to have acceptance tests identified before coding begins on a particular story. This column just contains a checkmark to indicate the tests are specified.
01:20

Lecture 17 – Using Flowchart & Schematics for Troubleshooting

Each day of a Sprint, the Development Team meets to communicate project status. This meeting is referred to a Daily Scrum or Daily Standup. The meeting specific guidelines for this meeting are:

•All Development Team members are prepared with updates for the meeting

•Meetings starts precisely on time even when any Development Team members are missing

•Meetings must occur at the same location and time each day

•Meeting duration is time-boxed at 15 minutes

•Anyone is welcome, however only core role member normally speak

During each meeting, each team member must answer these three questions:

•What did you achieve yesterday?

•What do you plan to do today?

•Will you encounter any impediments or roadblocks?

Any impediment, questions, or issues identified in this meeting are documented by the Scrum Master.

Documented issues and action items are assigned for investigation or work as appropriate. Issue and action resolution is performed outside of the Daily Scrum meeting; detailed discussions must not occur in this meeting.

00:51

Lecture 18 – Backlog Grooming (Story-Time)

Development teams spend time during a sprint performing Product Backlog grooming

•Process for estimating existing backlog using effort or story points

•Refining acceptance criteria for each story

•Breaking larger stories into smaller stories.

A commonly used method for estimation is Planning Poker.

•Meetings durations are no longer than an hour

•Meetings don't include breaking stories into tasks

•The team decides the number of meetings needed each week.

1 question

What are the core roles of Agile Scrum?

Section 3: Agile Planning, Demo, and Closure Meetings
00:55

Lecture 19 – Scrum of Scrums (Dependencies)

Normally each day following the Daily Scrum,

•Meetings enable clusters of teams to discuss work while focusing especially on overlapping areas and integration.

•Each team designates a member to attend.

•Agendas are the same as for Daily Scrums, but also include these four questions:

•What's your team achieved since the last meeting?

•What will your team achieve before the next meeting?

•What obstacles slow your team's progress or otherwise present obstacles to your team's progress?

•Are you aware of dependencies your team may place in another team's path as obstacles?

00:58

Lecture 20 – Sprint Planning Meeting

At the beginning of each 7-30 day sprint cycle, a “Sprint planning meeting” is facilitated during which:

•Work to be performed is selected

•The Sprint Backlog detailing time to perform work is prepared by the entire team

•Volume and velocity of work to be performed during the current sprint is Identified and communicated

•An 8 hour time limit is set allocated as:

•During the 1st 4 hours, the entire team discusses prioritizing the Product Backlog

•During the 2nd 4hours, the Development Team develops a the Sprint plan resulting in the Sprint Backlog

After each sprint cycle, two meetings are held: the “Sprint Review Meeting” and the “Sprint Retrospective”

00:22

Lecture 21 – Sprint Review Meeting (Demo)

•There's a 4 hour time limit

•Work completed and not completed is reviewed

•Completed work's presented to the stakeholders referred to as the “demo”)

•Work not completed can't be demonstrated

Section 4: Conclusion …
03:41

Lecture 23 – Agile KPIs

Agile KPIs

•Actual Stories Completed vs. Committed Stories – the team's ability to understand and predict its capabilities. To measure, compare the number of stories committed to in sprint planning with the stories identified as completed in the sprint review.

•Technical Debt Management – the known problems and issues delivered at the end of the sprint. It is usually measured by the number of bugs, but may also include deliverables such as training material, user documentation and delivery media.

•Team Velocity – the consistency of the team's estimates from sprint to sprint. Calculate by comparing story points completed in the current sprint with points completed in the previous sprint; aim for +/- 10 percent.

•Quality Delivered to Customers – Are we building the product the customer needs? Does every sprint provide value to customers and become a potentially releasable piece of the product? It's not necessarily a product ready to release but rather a work in progress, designed to solicit customer comments, opinions and suggestions. This can best be measured by surveying the customers and stakeholders.

•Team Enthusiasm – a major component for a successful scrum team. If teammates aren't enthusiastic, no process or methodology will help. Measuring enthusiasm can be done by observing various sprint meetings or, the most straightforward approach, simply asking team members “Do you feel happy?” and “How motivated do you feel?”

•Retrospective Process Improvement – the scrum team's ability to revise its development process to make it more effective and enjoyable for the next sprint. This can be measured using the count of retrospective items identified, the retrospective items the team committed to addressing and the items resolved by the end of the sprint.

•Communication – how well the team, product owner, scrum master, customers and stakeholders are conducting open and honest communications. Through observing and listening you will get indications and clues about how well everyone is communicating.

•Team's Adherence to Scrum Rules and Engineering Practices – Although scrum doesn't prescribe engineering practices—unlike XP—most companies define several of their own for their projects. You want to ensure that the scrum team follows the rules your company defines. This can be measured by counting the infractions that occur during each sprint.

•Team's Understanding of Sprint Scope and Goal – a subjective measure of how well the customer, product team and development team understand and focus on the sprint stories and goal. The goal is usually aligned with the intended customer value to be delivered and is defined in the acceptance criteria of the stories. This is best determined through day-to-day contact and interaction with the team and customer feedback.

Which of the following are Agile KPIs
1 question
02:33

Lecture 23 – Learn Agile SCRUM Development for Project Managers – Conclusion


Course Goals

•Learn to discover and develop the scope and value of accelerated project deliverables

•Learn the critical focus points of the Agile Manifesto and key roles of Agile Scrum

•Learn the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats among various methodologies including RUP, SDLC, Agile Scrum

•Learn to determine determine work items providing most business value for each product backlog grooming to sprint story iterations

•Learn the focus of Daily Standups, Backlog Grooming, Scrum of Scrums, Planning Meeting, Review Meeting, and Retrospective

•Document and manage Business system, Stakeholder, Functional, Non-Functional, and data requirements

•Capture and clarify Business Rules and External Constraints that mandate limits to the delivered solution

•Develop measurable Solution Requirements and velocity for facilitation of End-User Acceptance Testing and working software delivery

•Enable collaboration of sponsors, users, & stakeholders about system functionality in business language.

Thank you and congratulations for taking this opportunity for yourself to expand your skills and knowledge. Thank you for your decision to complete this course successfully.

And, please, if your have any questions about any part of this training or any related questions to this course or Udemy please ask. You have my promise to find you an answer.

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Instructor Biography

Chuck Morrison, Program/Project Manager & Business/IT Architect (MBA, PMP)

“A working model using mission-driven measures in a team approach enables focus on profitable customer-driven solutions."

With extensive Program Management and Business Architecture experience in Silicon Valley California it's been my good fortune and opportunity to experience working with many Fortune 500 companies. Workflow modeling is my expertise, joy and passion. As a seasoned professional my enjoyment is using and sharing the skills and knowledge with others through teaching and writing. Chuck has also authored and published other Udemy courses, Amazon eBooks, Linked SlideShare, and YouTube videos.

PMI PMP certified: Principal Strategist, Architect, and Leader with MBA and extensive experience in business and technology consulting, planning, designing, mentoring, negotiating, and delivering project, product, program, and process solutions. Successful track record planning, managing, and leading small to multi-site, concurrent, complex cross-functional projects and portfolios requiring business process engineering, Internet and information technology, quality management, instrumentation, and training.

Specialties: -Programs/Projects Management (PMI PMP): Program, Product, Project, and Process (SDLC, Agile, PMBOK, DMAIC, RUP, ITIL, InfoSec, NetSec, CISSP)-Business/Technical Process/Systems Modeling, Analysis, and Design (UML, OOA/D, BRD, MRD, FRD, HLD, ERD)-Web Portal Planning, Design, Documentation, and QA (Web 2.0, HTML, TCP/IP, HTTP, B2B, B2C)-Client/Team-Focused Consultant, Mentor, and Communicator-Inventory/Supply Chain Modeling/Management (APICS CPIM)

Thank You and Best Regards,
Chuck Morrison, MBA, PMP, CPIM, WWISA

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