Kitless Character Creation
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Kitless Character Creation

How to create characters for your novel that are unique, real and necessary
New
5.0 (1 rating)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
11 students enrolled
Created by Harry Dewulf
Last updated 9/2017
English
Current price: $12 Original price: $55 Discount: 78% off
3 days left at this price!
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Includes:
  • 1.5 hours on-demand video
  • 1 Supplemental Resource
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Assignments
  • Certificate of Completion

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What Will I Learn?
  • Create characters that are fully integrated with their stories.
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • You should be able to both write and read in English.
Description

If you're writing a novel you already know that a novel needs characters.

  • But where do characters come from?
  • How do you invent characters that are compelling, convincing and realistic?
  • What sort of characters does your story need?

Kitless Character Creation is a set of tools and techniques wrapped around one big idea: 

Characters are created at the same time as the story.

Once you've grasped the relationship between characters and story, and how they interact during the creative process, you will find it much easier to create and manage your characters, to recognize their purpose and role in the story, and you'll see much more easily how your characters affect your readers.

In this course, you will learn how to use this relationship, and how it relates to all the common features of creating and developing characters:

  • introducing new characters
  • describing what characters look like
  • describing what characters think and feel
  • how the reader should get to know your characters
  • the effect of narrative voice and point of view on characters
Who is the target audience?
  • Anyone who wants to become an author
  • Experienced authors of fiction
Compare to Other Novel Writing Courses
Curriculum For This Course
11 Lectures
01:32:31
+
Introduction
1 Lecture 08:14

An outline of the course, and a pep-talk about ambition, and why an artist needs it.

Preview 08:14
+
Lessons
10 Lectures 01:18:21

A short lecture giving the outline of a story that I'm going to use as a framework for examples later in the course. Essential.

Lesson zero: Outline
03:56

How to think of characters as a story creator, rather than as a story teller or as a reader.

This lesson defines three new "types" of character; once you've learned and understood them, all the other character creation tools will make sense. Essential.

Preview 07:32

This assignment is about conjuring characters from nowhere. You will find this is easiest with additives and arisers.
Someone From Nothing - (Lesson one)
1 question

Some practical methodologies for keeping your characters memorable for both you and the reader. If you're already adept at character management, and you know how to make balanced and subtle use of backstory, this lesson may still be useful to you, as it puts character management and backstory in the context of story creation.

Lesson two: Butchery
14:03

Get some practice creating your first character management list, character background and character history.
Butchery - (lesson two)
3 questions

Some key insights into how to describe a character's physical appearance - what they look like - and the effect it has on the reader. Although many authors get this dead wrong every time, this is one of the features of storytelling that many authors instinctively get right. Which are you?

Lesson three: Outer Life
11:51

This is not a character sketch or character profile or anything like that. Really. This is an exercise in character establishment - the first stage of delivering your creation to the reader.
Outer Life - (lesson three)
1 question

Inner life is all about thoughts and feelings, and how you convey them to the reader. Part one covers feelings. Part two thoughts. The assignment is included in part two.

Lesson four: Inner Life (part one)
08:55

Inner life is all about thoughts and feelings, and how you convey them to the reader. Part one covers feelings. Part two thoughts. The assignment is included in part two.

Lesson four: Inner Life (part two)
04:42

You always have to know what your characters are thinking. But how much should you tell the reader?
Inner Life - (lesson four)
2 questions

This lesson is about the wrong way and the right way for the reader to find out about, and get to know a character. This is one of those features of storytelling where there are right and wrong ways. But of course, it's not as clear cut as that might sound, and there are variations for each of the three character types defined in lesson one.

Lesson five: Knowing the Character
08:14

One of the best ways to develop an additive character is to give them a "story-within-a-story" where they deal with some hardship or obstacle.
Knowing the Character - (lesson five)
1 question

You're probably already familiar with Point of View (POV) or narrative "voice." In this lesson you'll learn how the reader's relationship with characters is affected by it. It might not be what you're expecting.

Lesson six: Point of View
09:58

Some practice in POV coupled with character types.
Points of View - (lesson six)
3 questions

You'll probably have started to wonder whether the distinction between the three character types defined in lesson one is absolute, and binding. The reality is that although there can be some overlap between coevolver and additive, and some overlap between ariser and additive, in general, how the creative process generates characters is pretty stable. But they can transform from one type into another, either during the writing of a first draft, or when the first draft (the creation) is turned into the second draft (the telling).

In this lesson, you'll also learn the fundamental difference between a first draft and all other drafts, and I hope, understand why I bang on about this being a creative, artistic process all the time.

Preview 05:23

How to get more help on your assignments, and on your next book.

Preview 03:47
About the Instructor
Harry Dewulf
4.5 Average rating
39 Reviews
247 Students
6 Courses
Literary Editor and Story Development Expert.

I've spent the last 10 years working with authors to get their books ready for publication, and then getting them published in the new e-book/e-reader/print-on-demand market. Some of my authors have gone on to get publishing contracts, and others are both traditionally and self published, including multi-award-winner Kary English.

My regular clients rely on me to understand and stimulate their creative process. We work together from development of the first story idea , through the drafting, redrafting and editing, right up to packaging and book launch; or they call me in at whatever stage they need me.