How to Succeed in School or College

A web-based solution that can change your life, educationally!
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  • Lectures 27
  • Length 1.5 hours
  • Skill Level All Levels
  • Languages English
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About This Course

Published 8/2013 English

Course Description

getSMART - Make it mission-critical to be educationally Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Timely to reach your goal.

What is the course about?

  1. This tool takes a refreshing approach to the problem of student motivation.
  2. It doesn’t sugarcoat the need to work hard in school: with straight talk, it explains the reason why working hard is necessary.
  3. It offers a unique method for kids to research career possibilities that includes interviewing experts and visiting places of business.
  4. It addresses the illusion of “not being smart enough” that holds so many students back from realizing their full potential.

What are people saying?

  • "The Student’s Advantage’ is absolutely the best compilation of vital information for learning that I’ve ever seen! When I was reading this, I was constantly saying ‘yes, yes, yes, hallelujah!’ In my opinion the much needed basic information found in ‘The Student’s Advantage’ should be taught in mandatory classes in high school and to all students in their first year of college.”
    -Linda Dobson, Teacher
  • “Wyne Ince has stepped forward as a motivational speaker and writer for students of the high school level on how to approach education not only on a daily basis but also on a philosophical basis. This is perhaps one of the more devoted books focusing on teenagers as any on the market.”
    -Grady Harp
  • “Ince tells of success stories of students who began their education with numerous dysfunctions, but by applying the ‘7 Secrets’ emerged as future leaders in a myriad of fields. I have been teaching English for many years and I will recommend this book to my students as a worthwhile resource for those who wish to advance to higher education or even to make the most out of their high school years.”
    - Martin Asiner, Adjunct College Instructor

What kind of materials are included?

  • Video clips and practical assignments

What are the requirements?

  • A student's willingness to succeed in school
  • An appreciation for excellent, education-improving consultation

What am I going to get from this course?

  • By the end of this course, you will have a more mature perspective on the value of education.
  • In this course, you will learn effective study tips, how education can help you reach your dreams, types of degrees to pursue, various career choices, and much more.

What is the target audience?

  • Middle school (Ages: 11-14)
  • High school (Ages: 15-18)
  • Freshman Year (College)
  • Vocational or Trade school

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee.

Forever yours.
Lifetime access.

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android.

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section 1: The Journey Begins
01:38

Efficiency is doing things right; effectiveness is doing the right things. – Peter Drucker

I knew I could control one thing, and that is my time and my hours and my effort and my efficiency. – Ryan Seacrest

Our Three Rules for Educational Success:
• Maximize study time
• Maximize homework time
• Maximize review time

Notice that time is the main factor across all three rules. Think about this for a moment: Experience is a very valuable quality needed to perform a task efficiently and effectively, and it is often an essential factor in getting many jobs. What supports experience? It is time.

According to Dr. Donald E. Wetmore from the Productivity Institute, by taking one hour per day for independent study—that’s seven hours per week, 365 hours in a year—one can learn at the rate of a full-time student. In 3-5 years, the average person can become an expert in the topic of their choice, by spending only one hour per day. Wow!

Similar to how time influences the efficiency and effectiveness in the number of years of teaching, practicing medicine or law, and piloting, your proficiency in a subject will vary according to the time you allocate to it. Try increasing your study, homework, and review time in any course you find challenging. You already have the brain cells—put them to work! Give them some time.

More Information: Interesting facts and figures


The Value of Good Advice

“If you think education is expensive, try ignorance,” quips educator and attorney Derek Bok. And he’s right. There’s no limit to what ignorance can cost you. It can even cost you your life.

Education can be achieved through different means, and observing a task is one of them. But most people learn through words. Enter any classroom or library, and you’ll see in a flash that words – both written and spoken – knit together everything that is learned there.

When you interact with people – your friends, siblings, parents, and teachers – you use words to convey your thoughts and intentions. Words are an essential part of communicating and learning almost anything.

Words often come in the form of advice. Some of it is good, some not so good, and some advice is just plain bad. Good advice is an essential part of getting a good education. It can help you decide how far to go in school, how hard to study, what subjects to study, and what career is best for you.

The voice of experience is invaluable.

That’s the kind of advice you will find in this book. But what about the other advice you’re offered – the things your friends and parents and teachers tell you? Let’s talk about that for a moment.

Friends can give good advice, but sometimes they give bad advice because they know less than you do and they are shooting in the dark. They give you answers they think and hope are true. There will be other times, though, when people who you think are your friends will give you bad advice on purpose. This happens when they feel bad about themselves and want to see you fail. They think that if they see you miserable, they will feel less miserable themselves.

Main Point: “Could have”, “should have,” and “would have” are words you never want to end up saying about your education. To be able to say “I have” sounds better and it has worth.


How to Use This Book

Again, welcome to "Get the Most out of School!" Let’s begin by talking about how to use this guide. Each lecture is a standalone essay. This means they can be read in any sequence, but you will probably find them most useful if you read them in the order in which they appear.

When you get to the Student’s Success Roadmap, which is the main part of the guide, you’ll find exercises at the end of each step for you to complete. Becoming a successful student – or successful at anything – is a matter of doing, not just of reading or thinking. The exercises provide action steps that will help you integrate into your life what you’ve read, so that you own the skill and the knowledge you are reading about.

The Roadmap exercises will open doors to a world of opportunities, including the possibility of discovering your own ideal career. Some exercises take longer to complete than others. For the longer ones, you may wish to continue reading in the book at the same time as you work on an exercise. Just don’t let jumping forward in the text distract you from finishing the activity!

It is also important to get a blank notebook that you can use as a journal to record your research, insights, and experiences as you work through this guide. Over the next several years, you’ll find yourself returning to what you wrote in your journal to remind yourself of what you learned here. Reviewing the material will help you continue preparing for college and for your chosen career. Even in your adult years, the journal will have meaning: you will look back on it and savor the notes that led you on the road to your personal success.

03:36

What Is Success?

There are many kinds of success, but financial success is often a measure of other kinds of success.

While growing up, you always hear people talk about “success.” But what exactly is success?

Being successful means achieving the things you try to do, getting the things you try to get, and becoming what you try to become. Success means setting goals and reaching them. It means wanting something and attaining it.

When someone is described as successful, it means that most of the time they get what they go after. Successful people are generally rewarded with beautiful, comfortable homes; plenty of money; and the respect and admiration of the people who know them (which is usually lots of people).

Some successful people set and achieve goals that don’t promise great money or renown because they don’t care about those things. An example is Mother Teresa, trying to relieve the suffering of the sick and poor people of Calcutta. Her life was a success although she never accepted payment for what she did. For most of us, though, money is one of the rewards that comes with success.

When I was a teen, I really didn’t understand the importance of money. My parents worked very hard to attend to my various needs, including my education. However, as I grew older, I began to develop a keen interest in monitoring my spending and becoming responsible for my money. I was going to do what it took to save money so that I could help my family, others, and myself. Why? Money is an important part of being able to have fun, being able to easily meet everyday needs, and being able to give without sacrifice (though sacrificing is quite good sometimes because it teaches us how to be selfless).

In addition, I realized that I was going to become an adult at some point and that developing the discipline at an early point in my life to save my allowance, to work hard, and to control my wants and my needs would better prepare me for the days ahead when the role of money would become even more important as I began to take on adult responsibilities.

So what allows people to make a lot of money in their lives? Many people are highly paid for what they contribute to society. If you invent or create something that lots of people find useful, they reward you by paying you for your invention. If you choose a profession or vocation that’s in demand, such as a medical doctor or an electrician, you can command high wages for your services. If you invest money wisely (in real estate, for instance), that’s another opportunity for creating wealth.

And what do wealth-creating opportunities usually have in common? Education beyond high school! An inventor has studied a certain field enough to know how to make new inventions. People working in high-paying jobs have had education or training that qualifies them for the work. Successful investors are good at what they do because they have studied investment markets. Stumbling on luck and wealth by accident is very rare. Most affluent and successful people worked hard for those rewards, and the first part of their efforts was to get a good education.

You may want to become a plumber, architect, doctor, teacher, or fitness expert. The choice is yours, but you need an education to succeed. So learn as much as you can, starting now. And practice being successful by creating and achieving goals for yourself. (More about goal setting later!)

What does it take to be SMART?
Preview
02:55
05:42

Is College for Everyone?


Always choose “yes” for your education, but choose carefully what you wish to be educated about. Education is not optional—what you study is.

Is college for everyone? I’ll bet my answer is going to surprise you because the pressure is on all kids today to go to college. My answer is no. Not everyone should pursue a college degree. But everyone would be wise to get some kind of education beyond his or her high school diploma – either in college or in one of the vocations (skilled trades).

Not only college grads but also people with training in the trades earn a much higher income than people who stop their education with high school. In many cases, income in the trades compares with what you can earn with a college bachelor’s degree. For instance, in some parts of the country, plumbers charge $180 an hour – that’s more than many lawyers charge – and the plumbers have so much work they can hardly keep up with it!

Why is this happening? One reason is that there is a shortage of skilled trades people. In recent years, as it became trendy to send one’s kids to college, teens who had special talents with their hands, with machinery, or who were gifted in other unique ways were packed off to college without consideration of their talents or their other options.

It’s not surprising then, that people who need to hire an electrician or a plumber have to pay ridiculous amounts of money to get the job done because there aren’t enough people in the trades to do all the work. This means the plumbers and electricians can pretty much charge any price they like because when the pipe bursts or the wiring fails, folks have no choice but to get it fixed. They have to hire someone!

This is called “the law of supply and demand”: if you have too little of something, the price goes up; if you have too much of it, the price goes down. Too few skilled trades people means extra work for trades people and higher pay.

Nurses, for example, are now in very high demand. Travel nurses earn upwards of $100,000 a year (excellent pay!) while getting to travel all over the country. I’ve mentioned just a few of the many vocations that are aching for young people to enter them, to take the place of all the older people (baby boomers) who are now retiring.

Consider what would happen if all the teens in a nation decide they won’t learn the trades that keep a nation functioning, that they all will accept only desk jobs? A nation like that would fall apart because no one would know how to fix or build anything. There’d be no one to keep the country running.

Here’s another point to consider when choosing a career and how far you will go in your schooling: in times of a troubled economy, people with practical skills that everyone needs will never be out of work. Society will always require nurses, plumbers, carpenters, and electricians. Even in the Great Depression, people with those skills had work.

So think of college as just one of your options. If you are attracted to a certain trade or career, get as much exposure to it now as you can. Often teens and preteens are welcomed as volunteers in different shops and professions; hanging around in a volunteer capacity can show you what it’s like to actually work in that field. You may find it’s not as fun as it looks once you see it up close, or you may find that you love it!

I know a woman who was planning to major in psychology so that she could work as a counselor someday. The summer before her college junior year, she got a three-month job as an aide in a mental hospital, a job she thought she would love. To her surprise, she hated it. She discovered she was not cut out to be a counselor or to work with troubled people. Luckily she learned this before taking too many courses toward her degree. When she went back to school in the fall, she changed her major to English and avoided the misfortune of spending two years working toward a degree in psychology that she probably would never have used.

So don’t choose your career or your major based on your imaginings of what it would be like to work in that field. Get out there and find out for yourself what it really is like. Discover if you truly like it, and if you do, find out what education is needed to enter that field. These are the days to seriously investigate careers or vocations that interest you. Later in the book, we’ll talk about how you can do that.

07:18

The Seven Learning Secrets


Open up the power of your mind.

Benjamin Franklin, Albert Einstein, and all the great minds we read about in history knew about the Seven Learning Secrets: seven important ways to learn and remember things. This chapter will teach you the Seven Learning Secrets so that you can learn things in school more quickly and easily and remember the information for a longer period of time.

he Seven Learning Secrets To understand and remember something you want to learn, do one or more of these seven things:


1. Ask questions -- Asking questions triggers your brain to start learning. Questioning helps your mind process information by figuring out how the new facts fit with what you already know. Ask questions in class. (Aim to ask at least one good question in each class every day.) Also, write down questions you have while you are reading or doing your homework. When you can’t come up with the answers on your own, ask your teacher or another student to help.

2. Re-state it in your own words -- Often we think we understand something, but when we try to repeat it, we can’t because we didn’t understand it completely in the first place. The knowledge hadn’t yet gone deeply into our brains. When there’s something you need to remember or understand, say it out loud to yourself or write it down, using your own words. If you can’t do this on the first try, study the information once more, then try again. When you can re-state the information in simple words that make sense to you, you “own” the information. It will be much harder to forget because it has gone deeply into your memory.

3. Give examples of it -- Creating examples for yourself of things you learn in class makes the information real and meaningful to you. It also makes it easier to remember what you learned. If you can remember the example, you can remember the information it represents. The impact that examples can have is demonstrated daily on TV. An infomercial about a diet program talks not only about the science or process of producing the product, it also introduces before and after pictures of success stories. The obvious intention is to entice potential buyers to take out their credit cards as well as to etch images of the advertisement in the viewers’ minds for further consideration.

Likewise, if your teacher provides examples of how to solve quadratic equations, solving a few more problems on your own will prepare you to demonstrate the technique to someone else, and at the same time, cement the experience in your mind, building up your confidence level in that area.

4. Make connections between it and what you already know -- When you connect new information to something you already know, it makes the new information easy to grasp. It’s like adding a new piece to a puzzle: the whole picture becomes clearer. When you learn something and it reminds you of something else, pay attention to that. Remember that connection. That will help you to remember the new information.

5. Apply it to a real-life situation -- Applying something new that you learn to a real-life situation is another way to master information. Here is an example: instead of just reading about gravity in class, perform an experiment with your friends. Drop different objects – some heavy, some light – from a balcony. Which ones make it to the ground first? Or do they all arrive at the same time? You remember what you learn from real-life situations much longer than something you only read in a book.

6. Teach it -- One of the best ways to master knowledge is to teach what you’re learning to someone else. For this reason, one very good study method is to explain concepts from class to a friend and let the friend explain concepts to you. When you get stuck, just review the information again until you can explain it to each other without stumbling. Another thing you can do is try to teach something you learned in school to a younger brother or sister.

7. Talk about it -- Studies show that young people hold onto information longer and understand it better when they talk about it with their friends. Chatting with your friends and family about what you learn helps your brain process and retain the information.

03:06

Build a Knowledge Base (Full Transcript)


Every day, learn everything you can. A lot of learning is simply a matter of where you place your attention.

Every morning, you go to school and to class. All day long, you’re exposed to new material as your teachers work through their lesson plans for each subject. Why is it important for teachers to deliver so much information, and how can it really help you?

The best answer is one word: accumulation. That means the gradual collection of something. Through education, you accumulate knowledge. Education builds a knowledge base in your brain.

Your brain stores information and makes it available to you when you need it, much like a computer database provides you with information when you ask for it. The mind is actually a biological computer, the most sophisticated computer in the world.


So put your brain to work for you, just as you make your computer work for you. Accumulate knowledge. The more you accumulate, the more help you’ll have available – within yourself – for solving problems: both the kind your teacher gives you and the kind you run into in your life.

In an earlier section, we talked about what it means to be smart. Students who learn as much as they can in class naturally increase their smartness levels. They grow up to become smart adults, and smart adults have successful lives.

So work on building your knowledge base. Every day, learn everything you can. A lot of learning is just a matter of where you put your attention. Instead of daydreaming in class or while you’re reading that textbook, really focus on what you are hearing or reading. This will make the information go into your brain. Unless you pay attention to the information in front of you, it will float on past you like a cloud, leaving you no richer or wiser.


Students who’ve tried it both ways say school is more fun when you pay attention and keep up with what’s being taught. Even if it’s a subject you don’t like, time will pass more quickly if you focus on the teacher’s words rather than on the wall clock. You may even find that a subject you didn’t used to like will become more interesting. When you don’t like something, it’s often because you don’t understand it. When you apply your attention, your understanding grows.

The knowledge base you build in your brain is not just a collection of information. It’s a resource. The more you add to it, the better it will serve you. Answering questions on homework and exams gets easier when you’ve paid attention, memorized, and stored the information in your brain.

The more you know, the better able you are to make decisions, come up with good answers, and invent new solutions. Collecting knowledge is part of growing smart, and everyone who makes up his or her mind to do it can do it.

Whether you want to become an astronaut, an artist, or an airline attendant, your ability to reach your goal depends on how much knowledge you have. Develop an appetite for learning. The growing of your knowledge base is good for your mind and spirit, not to mention your fortune and your future.

02:55

Practice Makes You Proficient (Full Transcript)


For success in any field, practice is required.

I am sure you have heard the phrase, “Practice makes perfect.” Well, that’s not totally true because it’s not always possible to be perfect. I prefer to say, “Practice makes proficient.” In other words, practice makes us good or skilled at something.

Practice is a key component in remembering things. We usually need to expose our brain to information a number of times, over and over again, to get that information to stick and become a part of our knowledge base.

This is where IQ does make a slight difference. Some students are able to remember something with only a little repetition, while other students must expose their brain to the information a few more times to master it. But this doesn’t make one student bad and another one good: it only means most students have to work a little bit harder – practice a little bit more – than the few who seem to remember things almost automatically.


Practice or repetition can make you shine like a star. It makes you very proficient, very capable. Your brain stores memories in cells called neurons, using various patterns based on what you want to store. Each time you study your schoolwork, complete math problems, sing a song, or repeat an action, neurons connect in your brain to create a new circuit or to re-trace a path, representing what you have learned. It’s like a written inscription in the brain.

There’s a big difference between drawing a line in sand and etching a line in stone. When you draw a line in sand, it stays there a short while; then the wind and water wash it away. That is like exposing your brain to information only once: it doesn’t usually stick, or if it does, it doesn’t stick for long. Exposing your brain repeatedly to the same information is like carving a line in stone. This kind of line is hard to erase!

That’s why good students use repetition to strengthen the connection between their brain’s neurons and to improve their knowledge level. So maximize your learning potential using a proven technique: practice and practice again. Memorize and memorize again. Study it and study it again. Write it down and write it down again. Once you’ve done this enough, the information will be retrievable when you ask for it. Then it’s yours to keep.

And here’s another tip: when you think you have it memorized, hide the answer and ask yourself the question. Are you able to give the answer quickly and correctly? Or do you need to peek again to remember? Keep asking yourself for the answer when you are working on memorizing something. When you’re able to give the answer easily without peeking, that means your brain’s holding onto it. Ask yourself the question again later that day or the next day, to make sure you haven’t forgotten what you memorized. Continue doing that until the test, and the answers will be there for you when you need them!

Section 2: Preparing for a Career - You do have Options!
02:21

A Few Career Options


These are the years to begin investigating vocations or careers that you might enjoy.

Your personality is a combination of characteristics, including your likes and dislikes and those things that make you who you are. There are many personality tests that can help you understand yourself better. You can sample one of these tests by going to www.personalitydesk.com/personality-types or to www.personalitypathways.com.

Your personality – including your interests and talents – should be a major factor in selecting your career. You are never too young to begin thinking about a career path. All too soon you must be ready to brave the world of work, so prepare yourself now by investigating all the options.

In this section, we will look at a handful of career possibilities that you may or may not find interesting. There are hundreds of others, so don’t worry if nothing you see here appeals to you. This selection is just to demonstrate the wide variety of career opportunities that exist within any single field. If you do find a career listed here that sounds interesting, take the suggested Action Steps at the bottom of that section to learn more about that career.


Remember that one of the best ways to find out about a career is to talk to someone engaged in it. Most adults are very happy to help out teens who contact them asking for information about their line of work. Also ask what different but related jobs there are in their field because you may find those even more interesting.

And don’t just explore one career possibility – keep your horizons broad and explore several. Now let’s look at a few of the many career options you might want to consider!

02:39
Computers

(Full Transcript)

Overview: I like computers and make a living programming them. You can do the same. Even though you can pick up a book and learn how to repair and program, most companies require you to have a degree and oftentimes experience. So what are some of your options? A degree in computer science would teach you theory and present a system of ideas that explains the foundation of information and computation (calculation). It is a degree that prepares the holder for careers such as computer programmer, network administrator, and computer teacher.

Study computer engineering or computer systems engineering for a career that combines the use of computer science and electrical engineering to develop computer systems. While a computer science student mostly studies how to build software solutions, a computer engineer studies both the software and hardware aspects of computer solutions.

Training in Web development would offer skills in design, content development, and building websites. In simple terms, you would be able to create Web pages using an interesting and ever-increasing number of software tools and languages such as HTML, JavaScript, and CSS. Sites such as Facebook and YouTube use the skills of people trained in Web development.

You could become a computer-repair technician to maintain and repair computers, scanners, monitors, printers, and other computer equipment. If you do not wish to program or repair, you might consider a career in desktop publishing or getting training as a graphic designer (graphic artist), where you would use the computer to format and combine text, graphics, and photographs to create beautiful documents for printing.

Degree Required: Often (mainly for the science and engineering programs)

Action Step: Read the history and achievements sections of this Web page: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_science. Also visit http://www.seas.gwu.edu/~simhaweb/misc/cscareers.html

Computer Careers:

• Computer Animator

• Computer Artist

• Computer Engineer

• Computer Graphic Designer

• Computer Network Specialist

• Computer Programmer

• Electrical Engineer

• Game Designer

• Graphic Designer

• Information Security Specialist

• Information Systems Specialist

• Project Manager

• Software Engineer

• Technical Writer

• Video Game Designer

• Web Designer

• Web Developer

• Web Page Designer

Go to your library or browse the Internet for colleges and universities that offer degrees in computer science. In your journal, write the name of an institution you like and the qualifications required to gain admission.

02:31

Business

(Full Transcript)



Overview:
If you like selling things or services to other people, if you like being your own boss, if you like focusing on creative ways to make money, and if you want a lot of variety, you may be happy pursuing the career of a business owner, also called an entrepreneur. If you think this may be the niche for you, start thinking and behaving like an entrepreneur today, even while you are in school.

A successful and respected business owner is a good leader who understands how to manage projects, knows the art of setting goals and working toward their completion, understands that money should be managed and not lavished, thinks outside the box (creatively), and appreciates and values people. This means you should start developing a reputation for being a good listener, a student who completes homework and projects correctly, and who respects teachers and fellow students.

It’s a mistake to think of business as something that’s removed from having good relationships with people. Whatever you decide to build or produce, your customers are the people who end up buying what you offer. If they don’t like you, they probably won’t want to do business with you.

If this field interests you, check out the following books. Don’t become too occupied with starting a business now because your schoolwork could suffer as a successful business can require a lot of time. If you have a business club at your school, join up! Start thinking and acting like a creative entrepreneur.

Degree Required: Yes/Maybe (Preferred)

Action Step: Get information on going into business by visiting this site: http://www.sba.gov/category/navigation-structure/starting-managing-business/starting-business/establishing-business/bus

Also, read these books:

• Rich Dad Poor Dad (for Teens): The Secrets about Money – That You Don’t Learn in School! by Robert Kiyosaki and Sharon L. Lechter

• Not Your Parents’ Money Book: Making, Saving, and Spending Your Own Money, by Jean Chatzky and Erwin Haya

• The Young Investor: Projects and Activities for Making Your Money Grow (Educational Business Studies), by Katherine Roberta Bateman

After your reading, write down important points and ideas that struck you. Use these to help set goals for your future.

Business Careers

• Accountant

• Actuary

• Business Analyst

• Financial Adviser

• Financial Analyst

• Logistician

• Meeting Planner

• Public Relations Specialist

• Sales Manager

• Training Specialist

02:35

Building

(Full Transcript)

Overview: You may want to design buildings, build them, or maintain them. Many universities offer degrees in building and construction or building construction technology. Your interest in buildings could lead you to become any one of these:

• Architect

• Supervisor

• Contractor

• Construction Technician

• Construction Superintendent

A degree in construction could entail taking courses in concrete construction, framing principles, roof framing, architectural drafting, and construction material and site preparation.

Architects, for example, design houses, office buildings, skyscrapers, and even entire cities. So how does one become an architect? A university degree in architecture, proficiency in math, about two to three years of work experience, and a registration or license examination are required.

Here’s one thing to keep in mind: a study showed that in 2011, the unemployment rate of architects was the highest in the nation. That’s the kind of red flag you should take seriously. When selecting a career, it’s important to investigate whether the field is overcrowded, whether it is in need of more people, or if it is somewhere in between. Your interests and talents should be a major factor in your career choice, but so should the practicalities of the current and projected job market. What good is a degree in something you like if there are no jobs?

Degree Required: Yes (especially for architects and engineers)

Action Step:
Visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Construction and http://www.fireengineering.com/articles/2010/06/building-construction-understanding-loads-and-loading.html

Building Careers

• Architect

• Business Development Manager

• CAD Technician

• Construction Manager

• Construction Superintendent

• Construction Technician

• Contractor

• Contracts Manager

• Design Engineer

• Electrical Engineer

• Estimator

• Gas Engineer

• HVAC Engineer

• Maintenance Engineer

• Mechanical Engineer

• Planner

• Project Engineer

• Project Manager

• Refrigeration Engineer

• Site Manager

If you have an interest in this field, go to your library or browse the Internet for colleges and universities that offer degrees in building and construction. In your journal, write the name of an institution you like and the qualifications required to gain admission.

02:50

Healthcare

(Full Transcript)


Overview: Are you drawn to helping people who are sick? Or maybe you’re drawn to starched white lab coats, spotless laboratories, and medical technology? There is a wide range of careers available in the healthcare field – not just doctoring or nursing.

My sister-in-law is a nursing practitioner. To achieve this title, she first needed to get her registered nurse (RN) certification. An RN is a person who graduated from studies at a university or college and afterwards passed a national licensing exam. These professionals work in hospitals, schools, private homes, camps, and offices, all with the goal of maintaining health and preventing disease for families and other groups.

You already know what a doctor and dentist do, so let me tell you about other healthcare career options. Remember that it takes eleven to twelve years after high school graduation to become a doctor, seven to eight years to become a dentist, and two to four years to become a registered nurse. Of all the professionals in the medical field, nursing makes up the largest percentage, and there is a great and growing need for nurses today. The trend is expected to continue for decades.


Another career path in the healthcare industry is that of a clinical laboratory technologist. This job is also sometimes called clinical laboratory scientist, medical technologist, or clinical laboratory technician. In some countries, it is called biomedical scientist.

Generally, clinical laboratory professionals perform a very important support role to the medical field, particularly to physicians. They match blood for blood transfusions, and they use microscopes and other high-tech laboratory equipment to perform cell counts. They test blood for drug levels, determine how patients are responding to treatment, and they analyze body fluids and cells for parasites, bacteria, and other microscopic organisms.

A career in the healthcare field does not have to involve direct, physical contact with patients, although that may be what you prefer. It could take the form of a career in a lab, working behind the scenes to help maintain a healthy society.

Degree or Certification Required: Yes

Action Step: For more information on these fields, visit en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Health_care_provider. On the same Web page, follow the links to the right to read about other healthcare career possibilities.

Healthcare Careers

• Athletic Trainer

• Audiologist or Speech Pathologist

• Chiropractor

• Clinical Nurse Specialist

• Clinical Officer

• Community Health Worker

• Dentist

• Dietitian or Nutritionist

• Healthcare Administrator

• Medical Assistant

• Medical Technologist

• Nurse Anesthetist

• Nurse Practitioner

• Nurse

• Occupational Therapist

• Optometrist

• Pharmacist

• Pharmacologist

• Pharmacy Technician

• Phlebotomist

• Physician Assistant

• Physician

• Physiotherapist

• Podiatrist

• Psychologist

• Psychotherapist

• Respiratory Therapist

• Social Worker

01:09
Cooking

(Full Transcript)



Overview:
Is one of your greatest pleasures cooking or baking fabulous foods to delight your friends? If so, a career in the food industry may be something worth looking into. You might become a personal chef to anyone who is willing to pay you, an executive chef or master chef in a fantastic five-star restaurant, a sous chef who works alongside an executive chef, a pastry chef who is skilled in pastries and desserts, or a food stylist to take close-up photographs of food for magazines, menus, and advertisements. Or you could become a wine and beverage manager, also called a wine steward or sommelier, a person who oversees all liquor and wines served in a restaurant.

Degree or Certification Required: Yes

Action Step: Read the “related careers” section of the following Web page: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culinary_art – also visit http://www.cookingschools.com/careers-jobs/

Cooking Careers

• Personal Chef

• Executive Chef

• Sous Chef

• Pastry Chef

• Food Stylist

• Wine / Beverage Manager

• Baker

01:56

Defending

(Full Transcript)

Overview: If you dislike seeing people mistreated, whether they are friends, family, or even strangers, and you feel a passion to defend them because it is the right thing to do, then a career in law may be for you. So, what are your options? You could study for a degree in criminology for expert knowledge in a science that teaches you how to discover the who, what, where, when, and why of a crime. You might study cyber security to protect networks, personal information, and highly classified data from cyber attackers. A private investigator or private detective degree would train you how to investigate computer crimes such as identity theft, harassing emails, and illegal downloading of copyrighted material. You might like to become a paralegal, which is a legal assistant to a lawyer. Or you may decide to become a lawyer yourself.

Degree Required: Yes

Action Step: Visit www.myonlinecriminaljusticedegree.com and read more on these career options. Take note of the online training that is sometimes available:

Criminal Justice Degrees

• Attorney at Law

• Court Reporter

• Criminologist

• Forensic Scientist

• Legal Assistant

• Mediator

• Paralegal

• Law Enforcement Training

• Computer Security

• Correctional Officer

• Crime Scene Investigator

• Forensic Scientist

• Police Officer

• Private Investigator/ Private Detective

• Probation Officer

• Public Safety and Security Specialist

02:10

Engines

(Full Transcript)

Overview: I am not a pilot, but I am very interested in the science of how the forces of thrust, lift, drag, and weight enable a plane to take to the air and speed through it. I am not a mechanic, but I have a keen interest in how air enters the engine, mixes with fuel in an injection system, and then with the help of cylinders, pistons, and spark plugs, the car takes us to our desired destination.

I am also fascinated with how fuel, air, and sparks come together to start a lawnmower. My limited knowledge of engines is that of a hobbyist. There is actually very advanced science behind all those engines, and advanced science requires advanced studies.

What this means is that if you want to design and work on engines, you have to pay attention to your schoolwork, especially your math and other science courses. You might become an automotive engineer who specializes in designing and producing automobiles. You may like electrical engineering because you would study the science of electricity to design electrical equipment and systems. A degree in aerospace engineering would prepare you to design, test, and help produce airplanes, helicopters, missiles, and spacecraft.

Degree Required: Yes

Action Step: Visit www.onlineengineeringdegrees.net and click on each of the following degrees and on the “Degree Requirements” and “Employment Outlook” sections.

Engineering Careers:

• Aerospace Engineer

• Architectural Engineer

• Automotive Engineer

• Biomedical Engineer

• Chemical Engineer

• Civil Engineer

• Computer Engineer

• Electrical Engineer

• Electronics Engineer

• Engineering Manager

• Engineering Technologist

• Environmental Engineer

• Industrial Engineer

• Mechanical Engineer

03:09

Games/Sports

(Full Transcript)

Overview: You probably love playing with your Nintendo or Game Boy. If you love games enough to maybe make a career of them, this section is for you.

Most mainstream electronic games use some form of electronic engineering and programming. But if you wish to design games for mobile devices such the iPhone, iPad, and Droid, or games that run on a Mac or PC, you may want to pursue a career in world design, creating back stories, settings, and themes for games. System design is for people who use their mathematical skills to design a rules engine. Or you might work in user-interface design with the talented people who design the look and feel of the screens and create ways for users to interact with game applications.

On the other hand, if you are technically oriented, you might become a technical writer. In this case, choosing a career in game writing would allow you to use your imagination to come up with the story, text, and dialogue for games. A career in content design would give you the flexibility of creating graphic content and text and layouts on a screen.


Sport is a synonym for game. Whether you are nimbly gyrating the joystick of a 3-D computer game or sprinting a 400-meter relay at record speeds, both activities are a form of play. Maybe you love games like basketball, football, or soccer but do not wish to become a career athlete. In that case, you might pursue a professional career in sports. You could study for a degree in sports management and learn about the administrative, management, and marketing aspect of sports.

You would also learn about leisure recreation, fitness and wellness, emergency medicine, sports science, sports entertainment, and some legal aspects of sports. A degree in sports announcing and broadcasting might appeal to you if you wish to gain the skills to speak, interview, write, and research like the pros in the media. You would also be taught how to operate audio and visual broadcasting equipment.

Degree Required: Yes

Action Steps Visit the following websites:

http://oedb.org/library/features/video-game-degrees-and-careers

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_design

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sports_medicine

paying attention as you read to the role of the following career options related to games and sports:

Computer-Based Games

• 3-D Artist

• Animator

• Art Director

• Concept Artist

• Game Developer

• Programmer

• Scriptwriter

Sports Medicine • Athletic Trainer

• Biomechanic

• Chiropractor

• Ergonomic Specialist

• Exercise Physiologist

• Kinesiology Specialist

• Massage Therapist

• Occupational Therapist

• Orthopedic Specialist

• Personal Trainer

• Physical Therapist

• Sport Physician

03:00

Teaching

(Full Transcript)

Overview: Do people tell you you’re good at explaining complex things simply? Do you love working with children or teens? Do you like coaching or mentoring people one-on-one? If so, a career in teaching may be the place for you.

There are a great many ways a person can teach other than being a schoolteacher in grade school, high school, or college. There are motivational speakers, for instance, who travel around the country and the world inspiring people with their wisdom and knowledge through lectures. Highly trained professionals in a wide variety of fields provide the certification programs and skills training necessary for beginners to become masters in their particular area of expertise. This may involve giving individual, hands-on training such as coaching apprentice carpenters or apprentice electricians.

If you want to teach in an academic field, like a traditional school classroom, you’ll need to pursue the appropriate teaching certifications in college, often along with a major in something other than education. A high school English teacher, for example, has a degree in English, a minor in education, and a teacher’s certificate. Majoring in education allows you to teach elementary school and preschool, but in order to teach the higher grades, you must major in the subject you wish to teach and minor in education.

The exception is if you wish to teach college. In that case, you would specialize in the subject you want to teach and would not be required to take education (teaching) courses. For most college teaching positions (called professorships), a PhD is required, but sometimes a master’s degree will get you in the door.

If you want to teach a non-academic subject, such as how to be an electrician, you need to become a master in that vocation yourself before you attempt to teach others, and certifications are also required.

Degree Required: Depends on the position, but actual teaching usually requires a degree.

Action Step: Visit these three sites:

www.education-portal.com/requirements_to_be_a_teacher.html

www.midlandstech.com/edu/sds/howto/howtohigh.html

www.teachercertificationdegrees.com/careers/

then write in your journal about anything you see there that interests you.

Teaching Careers

• Art or Music Teacher

• Bilingual Teacher

• Business Teacher

• College Professor

• Early Childhood Educator

• Educational Technology Specialist

• Elementary School Teacher

• High School Teacher

• ESL Teacher

• Foreign Language Teacher

• Instructional Technology Specialist

• Physical Education Teacher

• Preschool Teacher

• Principal

• Reading Specialist

• School Administrator

• School Counselor

• Special Education Teacher

• Specialized Teacher

• Substitute Teacher

• Curriculum and Instruction Specialist

• Vocational Instructor

The careers outlined in this section are only a few of many hundreds available. Pay attention to your natural talents and interests, as well as to the needs of the market. (What skills are in demand and which fields have too many trained people competing for too few jobs?) Let these things guide you into an investigation of careers that might be attainable, profitable, and fulfilling to you personally.

00:22

Section 3: Preparing for Graduation and the World
01:37

To Learn from Experience or to Learn from Others?

You are not too young to start to construct your life. Draft the experiences of others into your blueprint for success.

When I was in high school, I heard people talk about “learning from my mistakes.” While it is possible and even wise to learn from the mistakes we make, I never really liked the idea.

A scientist once told me, “All mistakes are avoidable. That’s why they’re called mistakes.” It’s much nicer to catch yourself before you make a mistake than to make one and have to learn from it.

Mistakes are usually costly events, both emotionally and financially. Some people never recover from certain mistakes. So rather than focusing on learning from your mistakes, a better approach would be focusing on learning from the experiences of others.

Information in books is meant to help readers reduce the number of mistakes they make. A book represents the knowledge and experience of someone who has travelled a certain road before you. By reading and thinking about what happened to them, you gain wisdom. This is much pleasanter than repeating their mistakes in your own life and living through the consequences personally.

This, then, is another reason to develop an appetite for reading, asking questions, and researching. Let books become your friends, and let Internet information searches become a habit because there isn’t anything blissful about ignorance or taking the wrong direction.

Avoid making mistakes by learning from other people’s experiences. Doing this will help you avoid many detours in your life and will put you on the direct path to success.

02:29

Terms of Engagement


You are important! You do count! Do not be swayed by anyone to think otherwise.

The Student’s Declaration of Importance and Terms of Engagement

• I commit myself to doing my best and to striving for perfection. I also realize that perfection is not always attainable. If I have done my best and achieved something good, I will not scold myself for not achieving perfection.

• While others may seek to put me down with their body language or words, I will not fall prey to their malice. I will always regard myself with respect, because I was made who I am for a purpose.

• Whenever I am criticized, I will consider the remark with objectivity. I then will either ignore it if the criticism is unfair or act on it if it has merit. When I am wrong, I will straighten my wheels and move forward on my road to success.

• I was created for a purpose, and I have an important role to fill in life. I will strive to learn what that is and to fulfill it. On my road to success, I will maintain respect for myself, my family, my teachers, my friends, those less fortunate, and rightful authority.

• I will work to uncover my special gifts and talents on the road to finding and fulfilling my life’s purpose. I will work to become an expert in the career or vocation I choose. I will not give up because of the hard work required. I understand that success is composed partly of talent but mostly of focused effort.

Let this declaration offer support and affirmation of your personal validity. Remember that others, far or near, have the same rights and seek the same privileges that you do. Make sure that what you do for your own success and happiness does not hamper the progress and happiness of any other person.

02:10

Staying Motivated


Keeping up your spirits is essential to success!

In this book, you’ve gained many tools to help you proceed quickly along the path of success. Hopefully, things you’ve read here have inspired you. You’ve applied them and grown from the effort. You are well on the way to developing new, good habits and to achieving your goals.

A habit is something you naturally do, but it’s also a behavior you have learned. Inspiration drives you to start toward a goal, but habits are the wheels that carry you over the finish line. Inspiration is like the engine. When you generate enough power, the new, good habits roll along by themselves. But if the power of inspiration starts to fade, the good habits can start to lose momentum.

That’s why it’s important to keep yourself positive, happy, and excited about your goals and your plan for success. Up until now, you’ve received motivation from a variety of sources: this book, your success with techniques you’ve learned here, encouragement from adults who care about you, outside material you’ve read and researched, and (hopefully) support from good friends.


Keep yourself supplied with multiple sources of inspiration and motivation. Read books about success. (See the suggested reading list at the end of this book.) When you need a lift, listen to “The Education Anthem” and watch material on the DVD that was made to go with this book. (You’ll find ordering information on the very last page.) And keep coming back to this book to review what you learned here. That will keep the information fresh in your mind.

But there is more you can do. Plan in those little rewards for yourself for when you reach your goal, or for when you reach a milestone along the way. Studies show that giving yourself a deserved reward is very effective in helping you continue on toward your goal.

There is something else you can do: make a point of hanging out with other good students. Are your friends good students or are they poor ones? Do you hang with a crowd that takes school seriously or with kids who don’t?

If you’re in the second category, it’s important to think about switching tribes. After all, how much harder is it going to be to put in the effort to study and learn if your friends all think school is a waste of time? With that kind of influence around you, how long will your resolve last?

I know it can be hard to make friends with a different group once you’ve gotten a reputation for being a certain kind of student. But people can and do change. Everyone knows that. If your classmates who are serious students see you suddenly making an effort in class, asking questions, and starting to earn better grades, they are going to start looking at you differently.

Observe the way the serious students dress versus the kids who make light of school, and start dressing like the group you’d like to be part of. That, too, will send a message to the good students that you are coming over to their side. Once you prove yourself serious, expect to be treated in a friendlier way. It will take time to win them over, and you’ll be on your own for a while. You will have to prove yourself. But if you really do make up your mind to make education a priority, you will find others like you who appreciate your efforts and want to be your friend.

Friends help each other to do better. Having friends your own age who support your efforts to be a success will motivate you on your path. So make a real point of earning your place in the kind of peer group that lends strength to your goals. Avoid the draining influence of peers who don’t appreciate what you’re trying to do.

Getting a good education is hard enough without having so-called friends trying to pull you down. Surround yourself with people who represent the kind of person you want to be. Then you will become your own best version of yourself.

01:24

Section 4: Bonus - Please Enjoy!
The Education Anthem
Preview
03:05
The Education Formula
01:15
07:05

Promises are made, promises are broken. However, your future is depending your unwavering commitment to  education. Keep that promise!

con-check.png"Rarely promise, but, if lawful, constantly perform." ~William Penn

con-check.png"Unless commitment is made, there are only promises and hopes; but no plans." ~Peter F. Drucker

con-check.png"If you had started doing anything two weeks ago, by today you would have been two weeks better at it." ~John Mayer

con-check.png"Without commitment, you cannot have depth in anything, whether it's a relationship, a business or a hobby." ~Neil Strauss

 
Section 5: Your Turn - Practical, Meaningful Assignments
Article


SMART Goal Worksheet

Today’s Date: __________ Target Date: ____________

Start Date: ____________

Date Achieved: ______________

Goal:

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

Make sure your goal is SMART Specific: What exactly will you accomplish?

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

Measurable: How will you know when you have reached this goal?

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

Achievable: Is achieving this goal realistic if you give it your effort and commitment? Have you got the resources to achieve this goal? If not, how will you get them?

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

Relevant: Why is this goal significant to your life?

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

Timely: When will you achieve this goal?

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

This goal is important because:

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

The benefits of achieving this goal will be:

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

Take Action!

Potential Obstacles Potential Solutions

___________________ _____________________

___________________ _____________________

___________________ _____________________

___________________ _____________________

___________________ _____________________

___________________ _____________________

___________________ _____________________

___________________ _____________________

Who are the people you will ask to help you?

___________________________________________

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Specific Action Steps: What steps need to be taken to get you to your goal?

What? Expected Completion Date Date Completed

________ _________________ ______________

________ _________________ ______________

________ _________________ ______________

________ _________________ ______________

________ _________________ ______________

________ _________________ ______________

________ _________________ ______________

________ _________________ ______________

________ _________________ ______________

Printed with permission from OfficeArrow.com ©2008

Article


Spent time is gone forever, so manage your time well. The days of your life are like sands in an hourglass.

Setting goals and managing time go hand in hand. People who don’t have goals have no reason to manage their time. When there’s something you want, though, things are different. Then you want to make sure there’s enough time in your day and your week for you to work toward your goal.

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Instructor Biography

iUseMyBrain2 Project, You now have access to the tool needed to succeed in School!

About the author

Wyne Ince is an ardent advocate of the belief that, with proper guidance and encouragement, every student can excel. He has a particular interest in the educational advancement of young people based on his first-hand teaching experience at the City University of New York (CUNY). As an information technology professional—including his work as an iPhone/iPad programmer—he has created many applications designed to reinforce the fundamentals of education. Ince is founder of the iUseMyBrain2 Project, an initiative of TheMotivators, Inc., a private entity that seeks to develop learning tools, such as this guide, to coach and motivate students.

Ince holds a bachelor’s degree in computer science from CUNY and a master’s in telecommunication and information management from Polytechnic Institute of New York University (NYU).

However, the steps to earning those degrees were not a smooth, direct journey at all. Family poverty during some of his elementary school years meant he had to attend school without sufficient supplies, overcoming the taunts and bullying of his classmates. He was unable to attend high school at all for family-related reasons. He became determined to escape the paycheck-to-paycheck living that characterized his family, wanted to become the first member of his family to earn a substantial income, not a meager one. He realized that education was his only hope, and he pursued it successfully.

It is out of an abundance of concern about children’s education that he has put this course together. It distresses him to see children idling and wasting their time and mental capabilities. As only one example, because of his deep interest in educating others, while he was still a college student himself, Wyne developed a computer application, The Ultimate Teaching Tool, to help other college students orient themselves to first-year college computer courses.


A special note to you

We are very excited about your education. Why? You see, most children really do have the inborn capability to learn just about anything! However, many simply don’t realize it. They attend school automatically, study just enough to get by, and go through their school years aimlessly, never seriously considering graduation or something called a career. However, graduation does arrive and they are quickly faced with adult responsibilities. Nonetheless, there’s no reason for despair. We at the iUseMyBrain2 Project (“I use my brain, too”) have developed a solution, an hour jam-packed with the type and quality of information designed to open a young mind to hope and purpose. Yes, often what’s missing is not the capability, but the insight and knowledge of key preparatory information.

Think about this question for a moment: Ordinarily, what enables one person to make the right decision without guessing, to take the right path, and to avoid danger, while someone else, faced with the same situation, will do exactly the opposite, and fail? The answer is knowledge; it’s having the correct information and using it. This course is designed to share accurate and eye-opening information with any student from the age of 12 through junior year in college. Further, it is the type of information that parents and guardians would love to give their child. But they may not have the time or the knowhow to do so completely, using a method that can be effective anytime.


Thank you!

Wyne Ince, Founder

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