Introduction to Mobile Games Development with Gamesalad

Learn to make Apple iOS, Android and desktop video games from scratch without any programming!
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  • Lectures 52
  • Length 8.5 hours
  • Skill Level Beginner Level
  • Languages English
  • Includes Lifetime access
    30 day money back guarantee!
    Available on iOS and Android
    Certificate of Completion
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About This Course

Published 6/2013 English

Course Description

Since the launch of the Apple App Store in 2008, games have been one of the most downloaded categories of apps for iOS devices, the same holds true for the Android App Stores. Most people seem to think games are very hard to build because they require a lot of difficult to learn programming knowledge. But in this class I will teach you how easy it is to make your own games with NO programming knowledge at all.

No prior programming or game development experience is needed for this class. In this class you will learn how to use Gamesalad Creator to create three different video games. You'll learn:

  • How to set up and use Gamesalad's development environment
  • How to think like a game developer
  • About key game elements like sprites, behaviors, audio, and more
  • How to set up different kinds of player interaction, keyboard for desktop games and touch controls for mobile games
  • How to add physics to your games
  • How to publish your games as HTML 5 and post it on your own webpage

The three games that you will have completed by the end of class are:

  • Classic Pong
  • An Endless Runner
  • And a Physics Puzzle game

All three games can be previewed for FREE from the lecture outline below!

Learn Gamesalad Book! I have recently published a book titled "Learn Mobile Game Development in One Day Using Gamesalad". While it is NOT required to complete this class it is a great companion to learn more details about Gamesalad and also contains four entirely different game building exercises. Udemy does not allow live links in this area so if you are interested in the book, simple do a Google search and it should pop right up for you.

Some features of Gamesalad Creator include:

Gamesalad offers a FREE 15 day free trial of their software which should be plenty of time to work through the lessons in this class. After the 15 day free trial you are able to continue using Gamesalad on a monthly or yearly basis through various subscription plans.

  • IOS and Android Publishing
  • Web Publishing with HTML 5
  • Publish to Macintosh and Windows computers
  • Publish to both the Kindle and the Nook
  • Built in Physics engine
  • Simple Drag & Drop user interface

Sign up now and you'll have all the knowledge you need to create and publish your own video games in no time!

Note: Gamesalad has versions that work on both the Macintosh and Windows operating systems. This course uses the Macintosh version for all of the lessons, while all of the functionality is the same between operating systems, the interface is different so Windows users will see different window and menu layouts in their software. If you are a Windows user consider watching the free preview of Lecture 3 where I discuss the differences between the Windows and Macintosh versions.

If you are a Windows user please be sure and watch and read the Windows lectures in Section 8 Bonus Material first!

What are the requirements?

  • FREE download of Gamesalad Creator for either Macintosh or Windows computers.
  • Mac OSX Lion or later, Core 2 Duo or later CPU required. Minimum of 2GB of RAM recommended
  • Windows Vista, Windows 7, or Windows 8, Core 2 Duo or later CPU required. Minimum of 2GB of RAM recommended

What am I going to get from this course?

  • You will learn how to create your own mobile and desktop games using Gamesalad.
  • You will learn about the elements (sprites, behaviors, physics, sounds, and more) that make a successful game.
  • You will learn to think like a game developer.
  • There are downloadable source files and supplementary information to compliment the lectures.
  • Interactive quizzes will let you test your knowledge of the subjects covered.
  • By the end of this course you will have completed 3 different video games.

What is the target audience?

  • Beginners
  • Anyone who wants to learn to make their own video games
  • Anyone who wants to make their games available for Macintosh, Windows, Android, iOS, and HTML 5 platforms.

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee.

Forever yours.
Lifetime access.

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android.

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section 1: Introduction, Installation and Overview
What is game development and what is Gamesalad?
Preview
02:42
Install Gamesalad for Macintosh
05:18
Macintosh Interface Overview And A Few Words About The Windows Version
Preview
04:01
Section 2: Assets for the Course
Article
The Macintosh zip file is below:
Article
The Windows zip file is below:
Section 3: Getting Down to Business with Gamesalad
4 pages
A series of short assignments to go with each lecture of Section 2. Each assignment adds to the previous so at the end you will have completed your first working Gamesalad project. There is a downloadable zip below that is for use with these assignments.
06:04
In Starting a new game project you'll learn:

  • How to start a new project in Gamesalad
  • What the different platforms are that you can create games for
  • What Resolution Independence means and why it's important

07:03
In this lecture we will look at the Gamesalad Scene Editor. 

You'll learn:
  • What scenes are and what they are used for
  • How to add and delete scenes
  • How to name and organize scenes
  • What the Stage is and how it's used
  • Some of the many controls in the Scene Editor
13:49
Part 2 of our look at the Scene Editor. 

You'll learn about:
  • On screen controls to play test your games
  • The Game and Scene Inspectors
  • The Behaviors, Images and Sounds Libraries
07:46
Part 1 of the Actors lecture. 

You'll learn:
  • What actors are and how to use them
  • How to add actors to your project
  • What the Actor Editor is and how to use it
  • What Actor Attributes are
  • How to add Behaviors to an actor
09:49
Part 2 of the Actors lecture. 

You'll learn:
  • More details on Behaviors and how to use them
  • About prototype actors and instance actors
  • How to organize your actors within the Actor Inspector
11:03
In the Tags lecture you will learn:

  • What tags are
  • Why you'll want to use tags in your games
  • How to organize your tags
10:31
In the Behaviors part 1 lecture we'll cover:

  • What behaviors are
  • How to add behaviors to your projects
  • A few specific behavior examples
  • The standard vs the pro behaviors
  • How to set options within behaviors
  • How to comment your behaviors with titles and notes
13:25
In the Behaviors part 2 lecture we'll cover:

  • How to combine behaviors to build interaction between two actors
  • How to think logically to build your behaviors in steps
  • The Rule behavior and it's settings
  • How to set up conditions and what will happen when those conditions are met or not met
15 questions
15 questions, covering the first half of section 2.

08:28
In the Attributes lecture part 1 we'll discuss:

  • What Attributes are
  • What some of the default attributes are
  • How to add your own attributes
  • Actor level attributes vs game level attributes
  • The different kinds of attributes (boolean, text, integer, real, angle and index)
07:26
In the Attributes lecture part 2 we'll discuss:

  • Common uses for Attributes
  • More on actor level and game level attributes
1 page
A handout detailing the various attribute types and what they are best used for in Gamesalad.
08:41
In this Graphics part 1 lecture you'll learn:
  • How to add graphic images to your projects
  • What file types and sizes (resolutions) to use
  • How to place and use images in your projects
  • What some of the graphics settings do.
12:24
In this Graphics part 2 lecture we continue discussing graphics settings in Gamesalad. We'll look at some of the graphics options including:
  • Horizontal and Vertical Wrap
  • Tile width and height
  • The various blending modes available
  • You will also learn about animation in Gamesalad
  • In closing I'll discuss the importance of a consisten graphic style in your projects.
1 page
A handout detailing some of the graphics options and settings available in Gamesalad.
08:19
In the Audio lecture we'll take a look at:
  • Adding sounds and music to your Gamesalad projects
  • What audio file types are supported
  • The difference between sound effects vs music in your game
  • How to play the audio once it's added to your projects.
13:34
In the Physics Engine lecture we'll:
  • Discuss physics in Gamesalad
  • Learn about Gamesalad's built in gravity function
  • Look at the actors individual physics settings
    • density
    • friction
    • bounciness
    • drag
    • angular drag
1 page
A handout detailing the various physics settings available in Gamesalad.
14 questions
14 questions, covering the second half of section 2.

Section 4: You're first full game — Classic Pong!
09:32
In this lecture we begin creating your first full game using Gamesalad, Pong. I'll show you what Pong is (in case you don't already know) and show you the version you will complete by the end of this series of lectures.
In addition to the Pong overview we'll being production of the game by choosing the game platform, establish some game settings and begin building the players paddle.
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Pong lecture series below.
09:16
In this lecture we'll finish the adding the controls to the players paddle and restrict it's movement between the upper and lower edges of the stage; build the basic controls of the computer controlled paddle; and add the center line to the play area.
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Pong lecture series from the first lecture "Make Your Own Pong–The First Commercially Successful Video Game".
11:29
In this lecture you will add 'walls' to the outside of play area to give the ball/puck something to bounce off of when it hits the edge of the stage; add the ball/puck; and update the players paddle to serve the ball.
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Pong lecture series from the first lecture "Make Your Own Pong–The First Commercially Successful Video Game".
10:52
In this lecture you will add a scoring system to the game and add the score display UI (user interface) on screen.

The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Pong lecture series from the first lecture "Make Your Own Pong–The First Commercially Successful Video Game".

10:53
In this lecture you'll fine tune the serving of the ball/puck and begin building the computer paddles AI (artificial intelligence).

The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Pong lecture series from the first lecture "Make Your Own Pong–The First Commercially Successful Video Game".

11:01
In this lecture we get our first bugs and squash them! We'll also tweak the AI we started in the previous lecture and get it working perfectly.

The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Pong lecture series from the first lecture "Make Your Own Pong–The First Commercially Successful Video Game".

12:13
In this lecture you'll update the computer paddle to allow it to take turns serving the ball/puck and update the ball/pucks rules so it doesn't ever get stuck on the X or Y axis.

The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Pong lecture series from the first lecture "Make Your Own Pong–The First Commercially Successful Video Game".

18:08
In this lecture you'll add some sound effects to the game; add some UI messages to the screen; and discuss how you can extend this version of Pong to make it you're own!

The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Pong lecture series from the first lecture "Make Your Own Pong–The First Commercially Successful Video Game".

Section 5: Creating your own endless runner style game!
02:50
In this lecture we will look at and discuss what an endless runner style game is and show you the game you will build in this series of lectures.
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Endless Runner lecture series below.
12:07
In this lecture we being the endless runner by establishing some initial game settings and start building some of the platforms behaviors and actions.
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Endless Runner lecture series from the first lecture "Endless Runner 1–What is an endless runner game?".
08:55
In this lecture you'll complete the platform started in the last lecture and learn how to add more 'endlessly' to the game.
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Endless Runner lecture series from the first lecture "Endless Runner 1–What is an endless runner game?".
09:12
In this lecture you'll learn how to randomize the appearance and location of each new platform as they appear on screen.
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Endless Runner lecture series from the first lecture "Endless Runner 1–What is an endless runner game?".
10:26
In this lecture you'll limit the placement of the platforms on screen so they never appear too high or too low on screen; learn to control the speed of the game; and begin building the players character.
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Endless Runner lecture series from the first lecture "Endless Runner 1–What is an endless runner game?".
10:52
In this lecture you'll add controlled jumping to the players character; discuss Gamesalads gravity; and starting adding some graphic images to the game.
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Endless Runner lecture series from the first lecture "Endless Runner 1–What is an endless runner game?".
15:39
In this lecture you'll animate the players character; add the background scenery; and add parallax scrolling to the background scenery.
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Endless Runner lecture series from the first lecture "Endless Runner 1–What is an endless runner game?".
17:45
In this lecture you'll add the toxic waste and saw blade obstacles to the game and randomize the placement of the saw blade on the platforms. 
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Endless Runner lecture series from the first lecture "Endless Runner 1–What is an endless runner game?".
22:09
In this lecture you'll finish the endless runner game by adding scoring and the UI display; adding a particle effect explosion when the player dies; and adding a splash screen to the game.
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Endless Runner lecture series from the first lecture "Endless Runner 1–What is an endless runner game?".
Section 6: Build a physics puzzle game!
04:26
In this lecture we'll discuss what a physics puzzle game is and I'll show you the one you will have completed by the end of this lecture series.
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Physics Puzzle Game lecture series below.
11:20
In this lecture you'll set up the games settings and begin building the games actors.
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Physics Puzzle Game lecture series from the first lecture "Physics Puzzle 1–Physics puzzle game demo".
10:31
In this lecture you'll add the background scenery to the game; start building a game level; and add some behaviors to the actors.
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Physics Puzzle Game lecture series from the first lecture "Physics Puzzle 1–Physics puzzle game demo".
14:10
In this lecture you'll continue developing the actors behaviors and actions; play test the actors; and take a close look at the particle behavior in Gamesalad.
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Physics Puzzle Game lecture series from the first lecture "Physics Puzzle 1–Physics puzzle game demo".
13:36
In this lecture you'll finish the particle breaking effect; learn to keep track of how many crates have been broken; add some UI text on screen; begin building the main character; and add the win condition to the game. 
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Physics Puzzle Game lecture series from the first lecture "Physics Puzzle 1–Physics puzzle game demo".
13:15
In this lecture you'll add the lose condition to the game and add the special effects for the win and lose conditions. 
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Physics Puzzle Game lecture series from the first lecture "Physics Puzzle 1–Physics puzzle game demo".
16:01
In this lecture you'll tweak the win and lose events; add a new level to the game; start building the UI buttons (home, pause and reload); and add the pause screen. 
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Physics Puzzle Game lecture series from the first lecture "Physics Puzzle 1–Physics puzzle game demo".
11:37
In this lecture you'll complete the UI button controls; add an animated splash screen; and add a sound track. 
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Physics Puzzle Game lecture series from the first lecture "Physics Puzzle 1–Physics puzzle game demo".
19:33
In this lecture you'll build the remaining levels of the game; discuss the concepts of level building and how to extend this game on your own. 
The source Gamesalad files (complete and empty versions) are available for download for this Physics Puzzle Game lecture series from the first lecture "Physics Puzzle 1–Physics puzzle game demo".
Section 7: Conclusion
10:48
A few words in closing about what we have accomplished in the class, where you can go next and how to contact me.
Section 8: Bonus Material
26:01
This lecture is a side by side comparison of the Macintosh and Windows Gamesalad interface. Since all of the lectures in this class are done using the Macintosh version of Gamesalad, I wanted to demonstrate to Windows users exactly how the two interfaces relate to each other. After watching this lecture Windows users should easily be able to follow along with the lectures for this class.
IMPORTANT Information for International Windows Users
1 page

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Instructor Biography

Jamie Cross, Gamesalad Mobile Game Development

Jamie Cross is a graphic designer that has been working in the field for nearly 25 years. He is currently a partner at Clay Communications, a graphic design studio located near Pittsburgh, PA.

In addition to graphic design Jamie has been involved in computer programming of one kind or another since the age of 16 when he got is first Commodore 64 computer. At that time he programmed in BASIC, now he has experience in several languages, including Java, HTML, and Javascript. But the bulk of his game development is done using Gamesalad Creator.

Jamie has published games to the Apple App Store, written articles about game development for the tuts.plus network of websites and runs his own website with lots of information about game and app development in general.

Jamie is also a professional illustrator and photographer who sells his work through various stock photography agencies and by commission.

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