Instructional Design Pro (Part 3): No Beginners Allowed!
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Instructional Design Pro (Part 3): No Beginners Allowed!

Curriculum Production
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0.0 (0 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
8 students enrolled
Created by Jason Teteak
Last updated 9/2017
English
English [Auto-generated]
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Includes:
  • 6.5 hours on-demand video
  • 34 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion

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What Will I Learn?
  • Create facilitator guides
  • Create workbooks
  • Create a lesson plan agenda
  • Create activities
  • Create the pre-activity hook
  • Create the activity
  • Create the post-activity review
  • Create in-class assessments
  • Create benchmarks
  • Create oral review
  • Create independent assessments 
  • Create a slideshow
  • Create core content slides
  • Create supplemental slides
  • Add pictures to your slide
  • Design an evaluation survey
  • Produce an evaluation survey
  • Interpret your evaluation survey
  • Create marketing materials
  • Create a marketing agenda
  • Create a marketing flyer
  • Create a marketing video
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • Make sure to download the workbook so you can follow along with the lectures.
Description

Create Facilitator Guides

This is truly a plug and play process where you get to see how much time you saved doing all your pre-work up front. You will have the freedom to finish up those last pieces and components of what you want the end product to look like and put it all together in a facilitator’s guide that rocks.

The facilitator’s guide is the number one tool that connects the instructional designer to the instructor to the learner. It’s the first document that the instructional designer writes in the production phase. It’s also the main document that the instructor will use when teaching the learners. 

Create In-Class Activities And Assessments

How do you know if your training is working? What if you could hit the mark with activities and assessments that not only engage and target learners, but also help you discover before they leave the class who “got it” and who didn’t. You’ll know if you need to go back and provide additional resources so your instructors can ensure success on the job for the learners. This lesson provides you the opportunity to tap into your creativity and allow the educator in you to shine through. 

Create Workbooks and Handouts

Every instructional designer wants to know how to create participant-centered curriculum and handouts that the learners are excited to open and use. Have you ever had any of the following questions, concerns, or needs for your class?

  • How do you “liven up” technical content?
  • How do you adjust existing curriculum to be more participant-centered,
  • yet stay within the confines of the existing class length?
  • How do you incorporate adequate participant-centered materials that include individual practice time when there are so many topics that need to be covered during a class?
  • How do you create the materials to hand out to the learners that are in line with the objectives—without coming across as overly focused on them?

We have spent the last fourteen lessons getting ready for this lesson. It’s time to create concise, effective materials you can use for even the most technical of classes. You’re about to learn the proper use and creation of workbooks, manuals, tip sheets, and agendas and the parameters around when to use each of them. 

Create a Slideshow

Curriculum writers don’t get tons and tons of opportunities to be creative. This chapter gives you that opportunity by offering guidance on adding visual slides to your class. It’s another chance to hit those different learning styles and play with a little technology while you’re at it. When you paint the right pictures, your end users will be happier because they’re not staring at the same screens all day long. 

Create Evaluation Surveys

If you’re able to take all the curriculum you’ve designed and built and find out if trainees learned what they needed to learn, then no matter who walks out or misses class, you know if they are successful at their job. You know whether you and your trainers met the objectives. 

Create Marketing Materials

Many trainers and instructional designers have fantastic curriculum, yet they struggle to get people to attend. You may have felt this pain where you spend hours, days, weeks, and even months creating all this curriculum, only to find a few people attending your classes.

What if you had no trouble getting people to your next class? How do you create that why or that buy-in so they come to class ready and willing to learn? It all comes down to good marketing.

Who is the target audience?
  • Curriculum Designers
  • Trainers
  • Training Managers
  • Teachers
  • Team Leads
Compare to Other Instructional Design Courses
Curriculum For This Course
26 Lectures
06:29:39
+
Introduction
1 Lecture 09:12

This is truly a plug and play process where you get to see how much time you saved doing all your pre-work up front. You will have the freedom to finish up those last pieces and components of what you want the end product to look like and put it all together in a facilitator’s guide that rocks.

Preview 09:12
+
Create Facilitator Guides
5 Lectures 01:21:05

This is truly a plug and play process where you get to see how much time you saved doing all your pre-work up front. You will have the freedom to finish up those last pieces and components of what you want the end product to look like and put it all together in a facilitator’s guide that rocks.

The facilitator’s guide is the number one tool that connects the instructional designer to the instructor to the learner. It’s the first document that the instructional designer writes in the production phase. It’s also the main document that the instructor will use when teaching the learners. 


Create the Framework - Part 1
19:52

It’s time to create the framework for each lesson of your course. You can do this on the lesson pages themselves on the Scribe Facilitator’s Guide Template. You simply find the lesson number that you would like to focus on, and then start filling that lesson framework in with the steps below. 

Create the Framework - Part 2
19:35

Now that you have the framework for each lesson set up, the next step is to start writing. This is the part that most instructional designers have been waiting for because you finally get to start writing curriculum in the traditional sense. 

Fill in the Framework with Text
16:47

The final step to creating the facilitator’s guide is to add pictures. There are many sources for pictures on the web. Search “stock photos” and a large number of sites will pop up. Look for up-to-date information about specific sites where you can find images available for a minimal fee or no fee. Read the information and licensing terms carefully. Copyright law governs the use and alteration of images. The words “royalty-free” mean you might pay a flat fee to use the image but you will not have to pay for each copy or use. The words “copyright-free” usually indicate that there is no charge for use and that you may be able to modify the image as you wish. 

Use Pictures to Add Impact - Part 1
14:50

Review the Use Pictures to Add Impact Activity.

Step One: Find the right image for the title page of your program. Take your lead from the main title and main hook, which suggest to your audience how you’ll enhance their pleasure points and resolve their pain points.

Step Two: Find an illustration for each lesson of your program. Take your cues for a picture from the lesson title and lesson hook to illustrate how you’d enhance the audience’s pleasure points and relieve their pain points for each lesson. 

Preview 10:01
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Create In-Class Activities and Assessments
4 Lectures 01:07:11

Most learners don’t naturally want to do activities. This is especially true of activities in which the learners do most of the work and/or work with other people. Because of this, you need to explain why they should do an activity, rather than just listen to the instructor lecture. The activity hook does this by grabbing the attention and interest of all learners and addressing two fundamental components of adult learning. 


Create Activity Content - Part 1
19:58

A good activity targets all four types of learning styles. Each and every activity needs to target Step Learners, Talk Learners, Create Learners and Research Learners at some point during the activity. We researched nine teaching strategies in lesson 8 that you can use for your activities. Let’s review those nine strategies. 

Create Activity Content - Part 2
15:59

What if your learners had a structured set of steps that, if they worked on them, they could be assured that they could put the objectives of the class into play in their lives? What if those steps were all immediately actionable things, based on the tasks and subtasks of the curriculum that they could use tomorrow? They can do all this with a structured set of steps known as “Your Turns.” 

Create "Your Turn" Assignments
12:57

How do you know if your training is working? How do you know if it really hits the mark for your learners? In this section, you’ll create in-class assessments so that you know before they even leave the class. 


Create In-Class Assessments
18:17
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Create Workbooks and Handouts
5 Lectures 01:08:24

This is one of the most exciting statements I have the pleasure of writing and saying in this program: for all intents and purposes, your workbook is done. All the work we have done over the last fourteen lessons will now serve us very well when creating the workbook. Other than the answers, the facilitator guide and the workbook are the same thing.

You’ll learn in this section exactly what to “remove” from the facilitator’s guide in order to create a pristine learner workbook, hot off the presses, that is ready to print and hand to each of your learners.

Create Learner Workbooks - Part 1
07:42

The workbook is a copy of the Scribe Facilitator’s Guide Template. As such, it has a built-in table of contents tied to each of the fields throughout the document. In order to update the table of contents, you do not want to do so manually. Instead, you can do the following steps:

  1. Right-click anywhere on the table of contents.

  2. Select !Update Field.

  3. Select Update entire table. 

Create Learner Workbooks - Part 2
13:20

The class agenda is a separate, one-page document that the learners receive, along with their workbooks, when they arrive at class. It’s separate because after the class, they will no longer need it. It’s given to the learners before class begins so that they can use it throughout the class to stay on track, follow along, and manage their time and expectations accordingly. 

Create a Class Agenda
08:52

The workbook you created in this chapter is substantial. It’s the same size as the facilitator’s guide. It contains nearly everything the learners will need in order to be engaged, follow along, understand, and do the objectives in your curriculum.

I’m not a big fan of lots of miscellaneous handouts to add to the pile for the learner to manage. Learners tend to misplace them, forget to bring them to subsequent days of a multi-day class, or simply feel overwhelmed by the number of handouts. With that said, there are a two key handouts (outside the workbook) you may want to consider. 


Create Tip Sheets - Part 1
19:37

It’s your turn to create tip sheets for your class.

Step One: Finish creating the “Your Turns” for each lesson of your class (if you haven’t already).

Step Two: Copy and paste the “Your Turns” for the first day of instruction into a document.

Step Three: Remove any non-critical “Your Turns” from the document. Step Four: Shorten the instructions of each step to one line or less.

Step Five: Repeat the above until you have a document that is one page or less (front to back).

Step Six: Make sure each tip sheet is written in “step form” for the Step Learners.

Step Seven: Include lesson references for each step (where the Research Learners can find more information in the workbook itself). 

Create Tip Sheets Activity
18:53
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Create a Slideshow
3 Lectures 45:44

These slides should be used only as signals, guideposts, and placeholders (and occasionally, as you’ll see later in this chapter, for giving clarity to a complex idea or activity). For the most part, you want your audience to be focused on the trainer and the curriculum and to understand that the core content will come directly and only from those two places—because that’s what makes them stay attentive. 

Create Your Core Content Slides
17:13

Supplemental slides are any slides that are used for giving clarity to a complex idea or activity. This includes learning activities, example slides, tables, charts, and fun activities. Just a reminder that even for activities and examples, for the most part, you want your audience members to be focused on the trainer and the curriculum because that’s what makes them stay attentive. 

Create Your Supplemental Slides
12:55

There are many sources for pictures on the web. Search “stock photos” and a large number of sites will pop up. Look for up-to-date information about specific sites where you can find images available for a minimal fee or no fee. Read the information and licensing terms carefully. Copyright law governs the use and alteration of images. The words “royalty-free” mean you might pay a flat fee to use the image but you will not have to pay for each copy or use. The words “copyright-free” usually indicate that there is no charge for use and that you may be able to modify the image as you wish. 

Add Pictures to Your Slides
15:36
+
Create Evaluation Surveys
3 Lectures 52:15

In general, it’s a really good idea to ask questions in an evaluation survey that allow you to get data points that can be analyzed. You will see in parts 2 and 3 of designing an evaluation survey that all of the questions in those areas allow for this data analysis. Even still, people are human, and asking free-text questions can also be powerful for you to find out what people “really think” about the class. There are 3 key components to an effectively designed training evaluation survey. 

Design Your Evaluation Survey
20:00

Once you have designed your training evaluation survey, it’s time to actually create and produce it. The figure on page 362 shows you an example of a highly effective evaluation survey that incorporates each of the “ratings questions” and the “recommendation question” we have already discussed in this chapter. 

Produce Your Evaluation Survey
19:59

Many trainers and instructional designers have spent sleepless nights after reading their training evaluation surveys. This is a sad and misunderstood fact. Training evaluations are meant to spur trainer growth and give trainers something to feel good about, not the other way around.

To ensure all of the trainers on your training team interpret the feedback on these training evaluation surveys the right way, there are some key steps to help them through the process.

Interpret Your Evaluation Survey
12:16
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Create Marketing Materials
4 Lectures 45:54

The first place to start with your marketing is with the very message that compels your potential attendees even before they show up to take your class. It’s the message that they see when they are still deciding if they would like to take your class.

Course descriptions and topic descriptions are often short, to the point, and without excitement or energy. They often don’t inspire the potential audience to take action—that is, to sign up for your course and tell others to do the same.

You have to make it clear to the audience why they would want the items on your agenda. Knowing why creates desire—the motivation to attend.  

Create a Marketing Message
10:20

Once you have created your marketing message, it’s time to put it into a one-page flyer that potential attendees can see (either physically or online) and immediately be drawn to your course. 

Create a Marketing Flyer
09:53

The last step to creating your marketing materials is creating a marketing video that prospective attendees can watch to find out all about your course. When people can hear you and see you, as is the case with a marketing video, your tone and body language is often more important than your words. Folk wisdom makes the same observation: “It’s not what you say; it’s how you say it.” 

Create a Marketing Video - Part 1
19:02

The last step is to record your marketing video. To create your marketing video script, you simply need to put your script into a format that you can easily read while you talk to the camera using a teleprompter.

Not everybody can afford a state-of-the-art, professional teleprompter. The good news is that you don’t have to. Instead, you can just use a slideshow. Simply put the words you want to say onto the slides and then use a handheld clicker to click through each slide to determine what you’re going to say next.

These days, you don’t have to have a fancy camera to record a quality video. There are many resources available, including smartphones, that allow you to record video that is enjoyable to watch. 

Create a Marketing Video - Part 2
06:39
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Instructional Design Pro Wrap Up
1 Lecture 19:54

Jason wraps up the course and reviews what you have learned.

Wrap Up
19:54
About the Instructor
Jason Teteak
4.7 Average rating
994 Reviews
10,574 Students
52 Courses
Author, Keynote & TEDx Speaker, CEO Rule the Room

Jason Teteak knows what it takes to Rule the Room. The master trainer and speaking presentation teacher has taught more than 50,000 people how to flawlessly command attention.

He’s won praise and a wide following for his original methods, his engaging style, and his knack for transferring communications skills via practical, simple, universal, and immediately actionable techniques.

Jason first made a reputation in the medical training industry, where he was known as “the presentation coach and trainer who trains the trainers.” Teteak’s attention to detail and precision in communicating definitive information was honed in serving this lifesaving industry.

In response to many requests, he began to offer personalized services and quickly developed a following as a private coach and a consultant whose clientele includes elite institutions, universities, and top corporate executives.

His new book, Rule the Room, was recently published in the summer of 2013. He has developed more than fifty presentation and communication training programs ranging in length from one hour to three days that serve as the basis for this unique, practical, and comprehensive course.