Motivation: The Science of Motivating Yourself and Your Team

The Essential Skill for Every Entrepreneur and Leader
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  • Lectures 21
  • Contents Video: 3.5 hours
  • Skill Level Beginner Level
  • Languages English
  • Includes Lifetime access
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About This Course

Published 12/2014 English

Course Description

There are two keys to success: competence and motivation. And, most important is becoming competent at motivating yourself and others. That is the purpose of this course.

I have authored more than ten books and the key to getting books published is simply the self-discipline to sit yourself down and write! I have been CEO of two companies and consulted with more than one hundred major corporations on human performance. They keys to improving motivation and performance are well known. In this course I have distilled the science of human behavior down to the essential practical lessons that every entrepreneur and manager must know and practice to succeed.

The topics covered in the course include the following:

  • Sources of Motivation
  • Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation
  • The Coaching Kata
  • Optimizing Social Reinforcement
  • Developing a System of Motivation
  • The ABC Model of Managing Behavior
  • Using Reinforcement Schedules
  • Is it a “Can’t Do” or a “Won’t Do?”
  • Managing Yourself. The Biggest Challenge!

What are the requirements?

  • No materials or software are required.
  • It will be desireable for the student to identify his/her personal long term life goals.
  • It is desirable that the student identify the team and team members for which he or she is responsible and be prepared to analyze their behavior and motivation.

What am I going to get from this course?

  • To gain mastery over your own behavior and to maximize your influence over your employees and associates.
  • To learn a model of analyzing and solving human performance problems.
  • To optimize all sources of motivation. You will learn an inclusive model that includes a) spiritual motivations, b) social motivation, and c) situational sources of motivation and methods to apply each to your own life and within your organizaton.
  • To learn to apply the science of behavior management to yourself and others. This includes the ABC model of identifying antecedents, pinpointed behavior, and consequences that reinforce the behavior.
  • You will learn how Lean management (Toyota Production System), is both a technical and social system and how it employees the forces of motivation to engage and optimzie human performance.
  • You will learn the "Coaching Kata", a simple and proven method of coaching others to improve specific skills and behavior.

What is the target audience?

  • Anyone who manages others, who leads a team, or who wishes to gain mastery over their own behavior.
  • Anyone who wants to develop their own self-discipline and self-motivation (writers, artists, entrepreneurs who work alone),
  • Team leaders.
  • Executives who are building a high performance culture.

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee.

Forever yours.
Lifetime access.

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android.

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section 1: Introduction to Motivating and Managing Human Performance
07:40

Which is more difficult: motivating yourself, or motivating others? The answer is that if you master the skills of self-motivation you will also master the skills of motivating others.

The purpose of this course is to help you to be successful at managing the behavior of yourself and others.

The objectives are:

§To learn a model of analyzing and solving human performance problems.

§To develop the skills of coaching others.

§To help your team improve their own motivation and the motivation of others.

§To create a positive environment at work.

§To gain mastery over your own behavior.

Section 2: Sources of Motivation
14:26

Where does motivation come from? The answer is not from one source. We derive motivation from a variety of sources and people have diverse interests and needs. Therefore, the job of the manager is to optimize all available sources of motivation.

This lecture presents several models: First, competency + motivation = performance; Second, motivation that is derived from within versus motivation that is derived from one's environment.

Finally, this session presents the hierarchy of motivation, a pyramid that begins with spiritual motivation or the motivation of a worthy purpose, the motivation derived from social relationships, and finally the situational motivation from one's immediate environment.

16:05

The need for a meaningful life and meaningful work is the most powerful source of motivation. The Purpose Principle defines the different sources of purpose in our life and how to find a worthy purpose in our work.

Attached is a PDF file that is a synopsis of my book, American Spirit, which includes a description of the purpose principle.

This lecture also describes how leaders can make use of the purpose principle to motivate others in their company or on their team.

The Hierarchy of Motivation
5 questions
16:53

Our learning and motivation begins in our first "learning organization." The Family. It is where we learn to learn and develop our values. Most important, we learn to support and appreciate others.

For most of humankind's history we have worked in small groups, family units or family like units. The mass production model of specialized work and the divorce of decision making from the work, destroyed social motivation.

In his book Trust, Francis Fukuyama shares the research that links the radius of trust to economic activity. High trust cultures, those with an extended "radius of trust", develop more vibrant economies than low trust cultures. Similarly, organizations in which there is high trust have higher rates of innovation and economic growth.

Trust is the social bond that is the soil of innovation.

What can you do to increase social motivation?

  • Strengthen the bonds of your own team.
  • Build trust between your team and others.
  • Demonstrate empathy and mutual interest.
  • Recognize the team, large and small.
  • Celebrate together as a team.
12:16

Situational motivation is the motivation derived from the antecedents and consequences to our behavior. In this lecture is share my experience setting up the first free economy behind prison walls, a system to "make performance matter" for inmates, a simulated economy that rewarded good behavior. It is simply an example of how we can establish systems, either for others in our organization, or for own own motivation and self-management.

11:42

If you understand how antecedents to behavior gain their effect, you gain the power to manage your environment to prompt the behavior your desire. The key elements of analyzing behavior are the following:

First, pinpointing the desired behavior.

Second, gathering data on the current rate of performance.

Third, establishing antecedents to the desired behavior.

Fourth, establishing effective consequences that reinforce the desired behavior.

Social and Situational Motivation
5 questions
Section 3: The Science of Behavior Management
09:55

Lean management, or Toyota Production System, is not only a technical system of just-in-time, kanbans, etc., but it is a social system built on the twin pillars of "respect for people" and "continuous improvement." These require establishing a culture of experimentation and positive reinforcement.

Honda and Toyota both adapted their culture to North America and both employ a good dose of behavior management practices. For example:

  • Toyota compensation is 75% base salary and 25% bonus based on a combination of individual and group performance.
  • Toyota practices the 4 to 1 principle – four positive to one negative comment or recognition.
  • Honda has a point system that rewards a variety of positive behavior.
  • You need to “make performance matter.”
06:54

How you define terms matter in our understanding of motivation. The terms used in behavior analysis are empirically defined, meaning they are defined by the outcome.

  • Reinforcement is a stimulus that follows a behavior, a consequence, that results in an increased rate of response of that behavior.
  • Positive Reinforcement is the presentation of a reinforcing stimulus.
  • Negative Reinforcement is the removal of a stimulus that results in an increased rate of response.
  • Punishment is a stimulus that results in a decreased rate of response.
  • Extinction is the absence of any consequence that results in the eventual reduction of response.
11:32

Positive Reinforcement increases the rate of a response. However, there are many different types of reinforcement, all of which can be used to strengthen the behavior of yourself or your team.

  • Intrinsic or Extrinsic
  • Tangible or Social
  • Immediate or Long Term
  • Certain or Uncertain
The Science of Behavior Management
5 questions
Section 4: How to Apply Behavior Management to Your Life and Work
10:34

Intrinsic reinforcement is derived from the work itself. There are a number of ways you can increase the degree of intrinsic reinforcement in your work:

1.Don’t use Extrinsic when someone is already Intrinsically motivated

2.Take the Challenge

3.Self-control – autonomy

4.Wholeness of Work – Making Chairs

5.Job Rotation

6.Decision making and engaging in CI

7.Teamwork

8.External praise can increase Intrinsic

9.Competency increases Intrinsic

09:01

Setting goals and objectives is one of the oldest and most important means of motivation. However, management by objectives became bureaucratic and demotivating. In this lecture I present the critical elements of successfully using goals and objectives.

  • Dream Big!
  • But, Target the Baby Steps
  • MBO & Self-Control
  • Engage and Gain Commitment
  • Visualize – Employ Visual Display
  • Plan Reinforcement Along the Way
  • PDCA
  • Engage in Reflection – Process it!
MBO & Self-Control
09:12
Intrinsic Motivation and Goals
5 questions
09:31

When reinforcement is delivered matters a great deal. There is a wealth of scientific literature derived from experiments with not only mice and pigeons, but in organizations as well, that provide insight into the effect of different schedules. In this video I explore the advantages and disadvantages of each of the following:

  • Fixed interval schedules
  • Variable interval schedules
  • Fixed ratio schedules
  • Variable ratio schedules
06:12

All performance problems are either ones of "Can't Do" or "Won't Do" - either motivation of skill.

It is important to analyze a problem do determine whether it is one of skill or motivation because the solution is entirely different. All the consequences, positive reinforcement or punishment, will have no effect if the person lacks the necessary skills to perform.

05:18

It is within our nature to model the behavior of significant others - parents, managers or heroes - who display behavior that we value. For this reason it is important that we seek models in our own life of individuals who have achieved the success we desire and who display the behavior we seek to develop.

Appreciative inquiry is the practice of finding examples of outstanding performance, heroes and heroines, within your organization to hold up as examples for others to emulate.

Analyzing and Improving Performance
5 questions
03:59

It is never all or nothing. Every day we make choices to stay late at work, read a book, or watch television, and every choice is a reflection of the balance of consequences. If you understand the balance of consequences you understand that a slight shift in positive reinforcement can completely change the outcome.

03:52

When reinforcement is delivered matters a great deal. As managers, it is our responsibility to act in a timely manner to reinforce behavior. Delay dilutes the power of positive reinforcement.

12:01

There are times, no matter how good we are at the positive forms of motivation, when we must use a negative consequence to reduce an undesirable behavior. How we do it will make the difference between constructive change in behavior and a negative influence on the entire group. Learn the skills of effective punishment.

Keys to Performance Management
5 questions
Section 5: The Coaching Kata
12:19

The Steps in the Coaching Kata are the following:

1.Positive Assumptions: I only made a positive assumption about the student and never criticized him. He had been criticized enough in his life. I assumed that he wanted to learn and could learn the skill of interviewing. Positive assumptions increase the likelihood of successful learning.

2.Pinpointed Behavior: I broke the skill down into pinpointed behaviors, a behavior that is easily observed and practiced. A pinpointed behavior is not a feeling, a character trait, or an impression like “he’s lazy.” It is a measurable behavior that can be observed. In other words, it is a fact.

3.Know the Current Condition: I provided the learner with baseline performance data – the video of his own first interview. This is to know the facts, observing the scorecard that establishes the current condition. In science, this current condition is called baseline data.

4.Modeling: I then provided a model, sticking out my own hand to shake his. He could observe this and easily imitate it.

5.Practice Pinpointed Behavior: I invited the student to practice each component of the interviewing skill. Each pinpointed behavior was practiced repeatedly. The more practice, the more it becomes habit.

6.Practice the Chain of Behavior: As each component behavior is learned, the learner can chain the components together into a fluid sequence that defines the skill.

7.Positive Reinforcement: We all need it! Whether children or presidents of companies, we all need to hear praise and approval from people who matter to us. Each time you reinforce a behavior, that behavior is more likely to occur again. It is also more likely to become intrinsically reinforcing. Reinforcement strengthens behavior.

14:07

The Steps in the Coaching Kata are the following:

1.Positive Assumptions: I only made a positive assumption about the student and never criticized him. He had been criticized enough in his life. I assumed that he wanted to learn and could learn the skill of interviewing. Positive assumptions increase the likelihood of successful learning.

2.Pinpointed Behavior: I broke the skill down into pinpointed behaviors, a behavior that is easily observed and practiced. A pinpointed behavior is not a feeling, a character trait, or an impression like “he’s lazy.” It is a measurable behavior that can be observed. In other words, it is a fact.

3.Know the Current Condition: I provided the learner with baseline performance data – the video of his own first interview. This is to know the facts, observing the scorecard that establishes the current condition. In science, this current condition is called baseline data.

4.Modeling: I then provided a model, sticking out my own hand to shake his. He could observe this and easily imitate it.

5.Practice Pinpointed Behavior: I invited the student to practice each component of the interviewing skill. Each pinpointed behavior was practiced repeatedly. The more practice, the more it becomes habit.

6.Practice the Chain of Behavior: As each component behavior is learned, the learner can chain the components together into a fluid sequence that defines the skill.

7.Positive Reinforcement: We all need it! Whether children or presidents of companies, we all need to hear praise and approval from people who matter to us. Each time you reinforce a behavior, that behavior is more likely to occur again. It is also more likely to become intrinsically reinforcing. Reinforcement strengthens behavior.

The Coaching Kata
5 questions
Section 6: Summary and Wishes for Your Success
07:06

After viewing the previous 20 lectures you may wish to create your own summary of what you got out of this course and what you hope to do better in the future. Here are my wishes for you:

My Wishes for you personally

  • Be clear about your purpose in life and at work. Become noble.
  • Have models and set goals (antecedents)
  • Surround your with others from whom you can learn.
  • Practice 4 to 1 with yourself. Recognize your own achievements.

My wishes for you as a leader

  • First become the model of the behavior you want from others.
  • Practice 4 to 1.
  • Always create aspirational goals and targets with your team members.
  • Analyze the environment and…
    1. Optimize intrinsic reinforcement
    2. Social recognition.
    3. Make performance matter
  • Become a great coach.

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Instructor Biography

Lawrence M. Miller, Lean Leadership Coach

For the past forty years Lawrence M. Miller has worked to improve the performance of organizations and the skills of their leaders. His expertise is derived from hands on experience creating change in the culture of hundreds of organizations.

He began his work in youth prisons after recognizing that the learning system in the organization had exactly the opposite of its intended effect – increasing, rather than decreasing, dysfunctional behavior. For four years he worked to redesign the prison system by establishing the first free-economy behind prison walls, where each inmate had to pay rent, maintain a checking account, and pay for everything he desired. This was his first application of organizational transformation.

He has been consulting, writing and speaking about business organization and culture since 1973. After ten years with another consulting firm, he formed his own firm, the Miller Howard Consulting Group in 1983. In 1998 he sold his firm to Towers Perrin, an international human resource consulting firm and became a Principal of that firm. In 1999 he left that firm to focus on solo consulting projects.

He and his firm were one of the early proponents of team-based management and worked with many clients to implement Team Management from the senior executive team to include every level and every employee in the organization. The Team Management process created a company of business managers, with every employee focused on continuous improvement of business performance. In addition to directing the overall change process, Mr. Miller personally coached the senior management team of many of his clients.

The implementation of Team Management led to the realization that the whole-system of the organization needed to be redesigned to create alignment so all systems, structure, skills, style and symbols support the same goals and culture. From this realization he developed the process of Whole System Architecture that is a high involvement method of rethinking all of the systems, structures and culture of the organization. Among his consulting clients have been 3M, Corning, Shell Oil Company, Amoco and Texaco, Shell Chemicals, Air Canada and Varig Airlines, Eastman Chemicals, Xerox, Harris Corporation, McDonald's and Chick-fil-A, Merck and Upjohn Pharmaceuticals, United Technologies, Metropolitan Life and Landmark Communications.

Mr. Miller has authored ten books, among them American Spirit: Visions of A New Corporate Culture, which was the text for Honda of America's course on their values and culture; and Barbarians to Bureaucrats: Corporate Life Cycle Strategies, which draws on the history of the rise and fall of civilizations to illustrate the patterns of leadership and evolution in corporate cultures. Most recently he authored Getting to Lean – Transformational Change Management that draws on the best change management practices such as socio-technical system design, appreciative inquiry, and systems thinking or learning organizations to provide a road map to transforming organizations. He has also authored Team Kata - Your Guide to Becoming A High Performing Team, the core human process of lean organizations. Most recently he published The Lean Coach that corresponds to his course on Coaching Leaders for Success. He has appeared on the Today Show, CNN, made numerous appearances on CNBC, has written for The New York Times and been the subject of a feature story in Industry Week magazine.


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