Photography - Become a Better Photographer - Part I

See results today! 50 photography tips for taking amazing photos with your DSLR, Mirrorless or compact camera.
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  • Lectures 54
  • Contents Video: 5.5 hours
  • Skill Level All Levels
  • Languages English
  • Includes Lifetime access
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About This Course

Published 7/2012 English

Course Description

'Probably the best course I have taken on Udemy and great fun '- Diane (enrolled in over a dozen other photography courses)

A set of over 50 video tutorials of photography tips and tricks, each one demonstrates one specific DSLR or compact camera photography tip. This course is aimed at amateur photographers from beginners through to enthusiasts.

● Photography training that works
● See immediate improvements in your photos
● Easy to follow and understand, with a fun teaching style
● All boring bits removed (well, most of them anyway!)

'Just kicked myself, that is a brilliant tip, how did I not think of it? These videos are brilliant!' - Wilfie

Bernie is so easy to listen to. This is by far the best course I have come across. Lovely quick videos that explain everything. Can not recommend it highly enough. Love it, love it, love it! - Patricia

This tip alone makes taking the course worthwhile - Beverley

There's lots to learn here and sometime Bernie can be a real laugh, but you can really tell that he knows what he's talking about. Well worth the money. - Michael

This has been such a great course and learning experience for me. You deserve more than five stars I gave in the review, I wish I was able to give you ten stars - Diane

These DSLR photography tips for beginners deal with a wide range of subjects and surprisingly, some of the more powerful tips are completely non-technical in nature. There are several FREE photography training videos that you can try out first, watch them and see for yourself just how good some of these DSLR photography tips and tricks are.

Downloads are ENABLED for this course!
If you have a slow internet connection, or want to take this course with you on your laptop, smartphone or other portable device, sign up and download all the videos and other course materials now.

Here are some of the general topics covered in this course:-

● Understand the 'Exposure Triangle' and get out of the Auto mode.

● Get incredible natural portrait lighting with this one simple pro tip that will flatter your subjects

● Get sharper images with better focussing technique and use of shutter speeds

● Working with natural light and dealing with the sun

● How understanding the direction of light can dramatically improve your photos

● How to use composition to take more dramatic and creative images

● Flatter your family and friends with some great posing tips (individual and group posing)

● How to improve your flash photography

● Controlling depth of field and the 'block of focus'

● How to get blue skies in your photos instead of washed out white skies

● How to take better photos in the snow

● How to avoid camera shake and get sharper images

● How to take photos of fireworks

● The myth of megapixels and image quality

● Digital cameras and their settings

.... and many more!

What are the requirements?

  • Any type of camera will be suitable for this course. Some lectures covering the same topic are duplicated so that they can be DSLR or compact camera specific.
  • Even though nearly all the tips are easy, as with any other skill, the more you practise the better you'll become!
  • Enthusiasm always helps!

What am I going to get from this course?

  • To explain camera settings
  • To demonstrate easy tips for getting sharp images
  • To show how an understanding of light and composition is worth more to you than a whole bagful of camera accessories
  • Raise awareness of the possibilities for taking great photos
  • To demonstrate easy ways of taking amazing outdoor portraits
  • To show some great ways of getting better landscape photos
  • To provide tips on getting better flash photos indoors
  • To show how to take better photos in specific environments (e.g snow, indoors by a window etc...)
  • To help understand image quality, resolution and the different camera types
  • To realise the great potential you have for becoming a great photographer

What is the target audience?

  • Beginner amateur photographers
  • Intermediate amateur photographers

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee.

Forever yours.
Lifetime access.

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android.

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section 1: Beginner camera settings (important info used in subsequent lectures)
06:55

Get out of the Auto mode using the exposure triangle, which demonstrates in simple terms how the individual aspects of exposure (aperture, shutter speed and ISO) affect the final exposure of the photo.

07:27

The ISO setting is very important if you want take photos indoors, or if the light is failing outside, because the higher ISO values on your camera will allow you to take photos in much lower light.

This video explains what it is, why you need to understand it, and how to change the ISO settings on your camera. 

Take a look at the 'ISO Noise Example' for an idea of how changing the ISO can directly affect the amount of noise in an image. This photo was taken a few years ago, cameras are getting better all of the time and so high ISO noise is now being handled much better by modern cameras.

07:18

Ever had your photos come out too light or too dark? If so, you've just fooled your camera's metering system.

Too much brightness in a scene can force the photo to be too dark. Weird eh? You'd think it would be the other way around!

This film shows the problem in more detail and describes how the simple exposure compensation setting can be used to brighten or darken your pictures. 

06:14

The lens aperture controls the amount of light entering through the lens, and also controls the depth of field. It's not really complicated, so don't be put off by the weird numbering and the back to front system!

A good understanding of apertures will see an improvement in your photos, more so if you use DSLR.

Oops, I made a mistake in this by referring to the black part of the eye as the Iris instead of the Pupil (I'm only human!)

Related film:-
Use depth of field and start getting creative (SLR's) 

02:45

This film shows you how to turn your camera's flash completely off or on. You'll need to know how to do this if you want to practise some of the photo techniques shown in some of the other videos.

It may seem quite trivial and unimportant, but knowing how to turn your flash on and off is very important if you want to improve your photography.

Not mentioned in this video, but if you have a camera with a pop-up flash (typically an SLR or higher end compact), and it keeps popping up (even when you don't want it to), make sure the camera is out of it's full auto setting (ie the green mode) and try again. 

Section 2: More advanced camera settings
09:41
This lecture shows 5 ways to help you get sharp focus, although aimed at DSLR photographers there are also helpful tips here for compact camera users. Here's a list of tips:-

  1. Get out of Auto and select your own focus area
  2. Focus and re-compose
  3. Make use of edge-contrast
  4. Manual pre-focussing
  5. Use 'Live Mode' for improved manual focussing



07:38

No matter how careful you are, when you press the shutter button there is always some movement of the camera. At faster shutter speeds there is no noticeable effect on the picture but at slower shutter speeds, images can look blurry due to the camera movement. This is generally referred to as camera shake and is made worse as you zoom in with your lens.

Your camera's shutter speed, the focal length, the way you stand and the way you hold the camera all have an effect on the amount of camera shake.

One very important point I forgot to mention during this film is to always press the shutter down in a slow smooth motion, avoid pressing the shutter button too vigorously.

07:44

For todays' photographers, the image histogram is a very powerful tool, the trouble is that many people either don't know of their existence or think that they are too complicated.

The good news is that the histogram is actually very simple to read, and once a few simple concepts are grasped, it will enable you to take much better pictures.

06:43

For DSLR and Mirrorless Camera Users
Please note that this lecture begins in the same way as the next lecture in describing 'Depth of Field', but then it splits off and refers specifically to aperture priority, mostly used by DSLR and Mirrorless camera users

Improve your photos by using depth of field to control which parts of the image are in focus. Aperture size is the main control for depth of field, but focal length and how far away you are from your focussed subject also make a difference.

It's much easier to show than it is to explain, so get a better understanding by watching this film.

04:01

For Compact Camera Users Only
Please note that this lecture begins in the same way as the previous lecture in describing 'Depth of Field', but then it splits off and refers specifically to compact cameras.

Aperture size is the main control for depth of field, but on many compact cameras you don't have direct access to the aperture setting (and nor would many people want it!). Due to the size of the sensors inside compact casmeras, the images have a wide depth of field, most of the photo is in focus, so you are limited in your options.

But there is a way around it, you can use the built-in scene modes (you know the ones, Portrait, Landscape, Beach and Snow etc....) to provide some control of depth of field in order to determine what's sharp and what's not!

Section 3: Improve your images with natural lighting
05:48

Top shade, sometimes known as Open Shade is a technique used by professional photographers to improve the quality of light on their subjects faces. It's a really flattering type of light and can make a huge difference to most types of portraits.

It's really easy to do, and once you've seen how great it works, you'll want to use the trick whenever you can.

03:27

Many people think that a sunny day provides perfect light for picture taking. While that may be true for some types of photography (e.g landscapes and buildings), it's certainly not true for taking pictures of people.

Trying to take portraits on a sunny day can prove difficult, especially if you want to flatter your subject, and lets face it, who doesn't want to look good in their photos!!

This video will show you a simple way of getting a beautiful portrait on a sunny day.

08:05

Many people don't even consider it when taking photos, but the direction of light in photography is one of the most important aspects of any picture. Just giving a little thought to the position of the sun before taking the photo can allow you to capture more detail, add depth to your subject and add impact using shadows.

It's simple common sense, and all here in this film, give it a whirl now!

03:06

When it comes to outside lighting, many pictures I see have featureless white skies, it's a shame because most photos will benefit if the sky is blue an preferably with lovely fluffy clouds.

Obviously we have no control over the weather and can't summon up fluffy clouds, but sometimes the sky will just go completely white and thereby reduce the impact of the photo.

Watch this film to find out why this happens and how you can avoid it.

Related lectures:-
Direction of light and the effect it has on your photos

04:12

Occasionally you may find yourself in a lovely room with great light, and decide to take a photo. You'll probably just leave your cameras in the Auto mode, and this will result in your camera's flash firing.

This will usually spoil the photo and you'll end up with just a snapshot which doesn't do the scene justice.

This film shows how to make the best of a lovely interior scene.

How to turn your flash on and off
The ISO setting explained

06:32

You can get brilliant results indoors during the day using window light, it's so much better than switching the flash on.

Generally speaking, using your camera's flash will produce unflattering portraits, this is the first of a two part film describing an alternative to using your camera's flash indoors to get better photos. 

03:04

You can get brilliant results indoors during the day using window light, it's so much better than switching the flash on.

Generally speaking, using your camera's flash will produce unflattering portraits, this is the second of two parts describing an alternative to using your camera's flash indoors to get better photos. 

05:36

Stunning photographs can be taken when shooting into the light, it's a simple lighting technique called backlighting and can produce wonderful images.

This film reveals all.

06:31

If you like to take photos of people, I'm a firm believer that a reflector, even a cheap home made one, is a must-have accessory.

I'm in a local park for this lecture discussing the use of reflectors in outdoor natural light portraits. Watch as I take you through some simple, elegant steps to make a great portrait 

Section 4: Improve your images using better composition
04:41

The 'rule of thirds' is a fundamental principle of good composition, and can have quite a dramatic effect on your images.

 It's a very easy technique to master and requires no special camera settings, so go out and practise it, and keep it in mind at all times when you frame your photos.

Watch out for this when watching dramas or films on TV or at the cinema, it's used all the time to give more impact to a scene. 

07:49

Use diagonal lines to add impact to your photos, it's easy to do and can be very effective. They can also help to draw the eye through a photo.

It's a simple compositional trick that can imply action and add depth to your photos, once you discover the secret you'll spot the technique used wherever you look... cinema TV and magazine images. 

08:21

Any time there is a strong line in a photograph, the viewers eye will naturally follow along it towards the actual subject. This can be anything from a telephone pole, the side of a building, a road or path, or even a dark shadow.

Leading lines can add drama to images, giving the photos a more emotional and compositional power.

It's a very easy technique to master and requires no special camera settings, so go out and practise it, and keep it in mind at all times when you frame your photos.

Also, watch out for these lines when watching dramas or films on TV or at the cinema, it's used all the time to give more impact to a scene.

Related lectures:-
Improved composition using diagonal lines
The rule of thirds
The half press of the shutter

02:36

While repetition in the humdrum of daily life can at times be a little boring, capturing them in a photo can add drama to the image.

Life is filled with patterns, many of which we overlook due to the fact that we see them so often and take them for granted, however once you get an eye for spotting them you’ll be amazed by what you see and you’ll wonder why you didn’t incorporate them into your photography before.

03:12

Foreground framing is a great technique for helping direct the viewer's eye right to the photo's star attraction.

A frame can also help clean up a composition by concealing distracting objects or by filling up a featureless sky.

04:34

Some subjects just seem to pop right out of the image, don't they? You can use light and colour to achieve this. But a very popular method is to blur the background whilst keeping the subject sharply in focus.

This film demonstrates the technique in detail for SLR and mirrorless camera users, it's much easier to do with these cameras, and looks great, so give it a go.

03:09

Some subjects just seem to pop right out of the image, don't they? You can use light and colour to achieve this. But a very popular method is to blur the background whilst keeping the subject sharply in focus.

This film demonstrates the technique in detail for compact and bridge type camera users, but bear in mind that due to the small sensor size of these cameras, the effect is nowhere near as pronounced as on a SLR, unless you photograph something really close up, i.e in the macro mode.

Having said all of that, even a slight blurring of the background, as shown in this film, will still help to improve a portrait.

Related lectures:-
Lens apertures explained
Use depth of field and start getting creative

03:34

It's so easy to do isn't it, you just didn't notice that lamppost sticking out of your husband's head, or the branch of a tree embedded in your girlfriend's shoulder.

They are the obvious ones, but even seemingly plain backgrounds can be distracting if they are a different colour or too bright. A busy or cluttered background can be quite distracting, ruin an otherwise nice portrait, but even slight mistakes in a background can lessen the impact of photos.

This film demonstrates the problem and offers some solutions. 

03:27

When most people look for a nice background for a photo in a rural environment, they'll choose a tree a or some flowers, or maybe a nice fountain.

While these can look nice, you can jazz up your images using something a little different

Grungy and industrial looking backgrounds can add a new dimension to you portraits, and they're not difficult to find, just keep your eyes peeled, this video shows you some ideas and examples.

03:21
Ok, I admit it, I might have previously said taking portraits against trees is a bit a boring, but there are easy ways you can use nature in all of it’s colourful glory to really improve your images and make stunning portraits.

This film shows you one technique that I use myself to get a a very pleasing abstract, textured, or patterned background
Section 5: Tips on posing for portraits
05:04

When taking photos of your friends and family, just a few small adjustments to the way they're standing can make a huge difference to how relaxed they look, and that will translate into a more flattering picture.

Posing is quite hard to remember, so go out and practise these tips afterwards, otherwise you'll forget them (I used to!) 

08:14

Family photos look a whole lot better when people feel comfortable and relaxed and when you avoid cheesy family poses and gimmicks, this film shows you several specific family poses and small group poses that you can use to improve your group photos.

Part 1 of group posing deals with standing poses, these are arguably a little more difficult than seated posing and can look a little too stiff or formal if you're not careful.

Also, there are definite ways of flattering people so they look their best, and this film provides some ideas.

Download the standing poses cribsheet

11:43

Family photos look a whole lot better when people feel comfortable and relaxed and when you avoid cheesy family poses and gimmicks, this film shows you several specific family poses and small group poses that you can use to improve your group photos.

Part 2 of group posing deals with seated family poses, these are quick fire posing tips that you can go out and practise yourself, they can make a real difference to family and group photos and give them a far more professional look.

Also, there are definite ways of flattering people so they look their best, and this film provides some ideas.

Download the seated poses cribsheet

07:59

This lecture demonstrates about a dozen natural looking poses for women. They're really easy to do and can make all the difference when you're taking a portrait of your mum, yours sister, girlfriend or wife, or even just a friend!!

Female posing crip sheet PDF file

07:20

This film shows a couple of ways to take a specific type of photo of a baby, under a year old. It's really easy to do, you can use a compact camera or SLR and you can get fantastic photos that the parents will just love

Related lectures:-
The magic of Top Shade
How to turn your flash on and off
The ISO setting explained

06:43

This film provides a few tips on taking photos of babies once they're sitting up or crawling.

It's really easy to do, you can use a compact camera or SLR and you can get fantastic photos that the parents will just love. Things to remember:-

  1. Find some good light
  2. Avoid distracting backgrounds, don't put the baby on someone's lap
  3. Have fun with the baby for some great expressions
  4. Use a medium focal length lens, wide angles lenses can skew the perspective if you're too close and a telephoto lenses could make it more difficult to get full length shots.
Section 6: Landscapes and scenery
21:28

In this film, I've got together with my friend Barbara, she's a great landscape photographer who kindly agreed to give up her time to show us her wonderful photos, and landscape photography tips and tricks.

Enjoy her great images from around the world, and listen to her talking through her thoughts about how she approached each photo opportunity and what she had to do to get the type of image she wanted.

This new video is a little different from the others so far, it lasts over 20 minutes and the format is quite different.

08:00

Yippee, it's snowing, it looks like a scene from a fairy tale out there, people having fun, sledging and maybe even throwing snowballs.

You've taken lots of photos and got some great shots... you think! Oh no, you've looked at the photos and erm... what's happened to your wonderful snowy pictures? Many of them look a bit dull, grey and maybe (dare I say), even a bit boring!

In this film, I'll show you how to take better photos in the snow, and how to capture some of that exciting atmosphere.

Related lectures:-
Exposure compensation explained 

Section 7: Flash photography
04:48

You've probably realised by now from the other films that I'm not a big fan of on-camera flash. But obviously sometimes you don't always have a choice, and have to use a flash to light the scene.

Any flashgun used directly, whether built-in or an external type, will give hard shadows on the background, and that's because it's a small light source relative to the subject. The only way to soften the light, is to make the source of light larger, and the most effective way of doing this with on-camera flash, is to bounce it. The only types of flashguns which can be bounced are the external ones that can be attached to your cameras' hot-shoe mount.

This film shows the dramatic difference bouncing the flash can have on your indoor flash photos.

04:36

You've already seen in a previous film how you can bounce the flash off walls and ceilings when using an external flashgun that has a swivel head (most do!). Bouncing the flash gives a nice overall soft light, but is it possible to use on-camera flash flash to take a slightly more creative portrait, one that looks a little more polished than a standard bounced flash portrait? Yes it is.

Watch the film to learn more.

Details of the Gobo / flag:
The material is available from craft shops and is called 'Funky Foam'. You can also find it on Ebay, it's not expensive and usually comes in A3 or A4 sheets. The dimensions of the one shown in this film is 11cm x 15cm, with 50cm diagonal cut outs at the bottom.

05:30

Have you noticed how portraits taken with the built-in or popup flash tend to reduce the attractiveness of your beautiful friends and family!! This happens because the small size of the flash, plus the fact that it's pointing directly at them, means that they will be lit by an unflattering, hard, kind of flat light, which also produces hard edged shadows.

Your options for getting better results with the built-in flash are limited, but there are a few things you can do to improve that harsh lighting look.

This film shows how you can soften those hard shadows by simple diffusing the light, it's the first of a 3 part series showing how you can improve indoor flash photos (don't expect miracles though!!)

05:10

Here's another great tip that shows how you can improve indoor photos taken with your cameras' built-in flash, this tip can be used regardless of the type of flash used.

Have you noticed how the backgrounds of indoor flash photos can look very dark and flat, almost like you took the photo in a cave? It doesn't always happen obviously, it varies depending on various circumstances, not least of which is how much light there already is in the scene. But if you're using your cameras' Auto setting, quite often the room light won't register on the photo and the whole scene will therefore be lit by the teeny weeny flash on the camera.

That's asking an awful lot of these small flashes, all things considered they generally do a decent job, but because of their small size, they often produce a flat, boring, and uninteresting type of light.

This film shows an easy tip that helps to balance the light from the flash with the ambient light in the room to get much more pleasing results. 

Section 8: Information and tips on using lenses
07:42

Ever wondered why the lenses used by professionals are so huge? What's the difference between those lenses and the one that came with your own SLR?This film is about camera lenses and discusses and compares zoom and prime lenses. Did you know for example, that zooming your lens can cause your shutter speed to slow right down and cause your otherwise stunning image to be spoilt by camera shake?

Most SLR's these days come with a kit lens and they're generally great quality, but to keep the costs down these type of camera lenses do have their limitations. A great addition to any SLR or mirrorless camera is a small fast prime lens, and they don't cost the earth.

All is revealed in this film

04:49

Everyone knows that zooming your lens in and out makes the subject larger or smaller in the frame. But what you may not realise is that zooming the lens (or using a telephoto instead of a wide angle lens) affects the look of your photos in other ways.

Although this film is about lens focal length and perspective, it's really the subject to camera distance which affects the perspective and which can have a big impact on your images.

Watch the film for more info

03:16

Everyone knows that zooming your lens in and out makes the subject larger or smaller in the frame. But what you may not realise is that zooming the lens (or using a telephoto instead of a wide angle lens) affects the look of your photos in other ways.

This film is about lens focal length and how it affects how much of the scene is in the frame, i.e the field of view. Even keeping your foreground subject the same size, the field of view will vary depending on the focal length.

Watch the film for more info

04:16

Everyone knows that zooming your lens in and out makes the subject larger or smaller in the frame. But what you may not realise is that zooming the lens (or using a telephoto instead of a wide angle lens) affects the look of your photos in other ways.

This film is about 'Depth of Field' and how changing the focal length affects how much of the image, from front to back,  is in focus. 

Section 9: Other general techniques
01:57

Here's a quick tip that shows a specific way of creating a fun, dramatic portrait.

Just put your subject up against a wall, fence, or shutters and shoot alongside it, it's really simple and requires no special settings.

Watch this film to see the amazing results you can get from this easy-to-do technique.

Related lectures:-
How the 'half press of the shutter' technique can improve your picture taking
Use the rule of thirds for better composition 
Better composition using diagonal lines 

06:39

Sometimes you can press the shutter button, and there's a delay before the camera actually takes the photo. This happens because the camera has to meter the scene and adjust the exposure, then it has to set the lens so that your subject is in focus.

This takes a little time, and is what causes the delay. Watch this film to find out how to avoid this so called 'shutter lag', whilst improving your focusing and exposure skills at the same time.

09:10

When you have a lovely set of photos after a holiday or family event, what do you do with them? Well, you can obviously print them or make photo albums, but you can't easily share those with distant friends.

Consider creating a slide show that you can share online, they're really easy to do and you can get stunning results.

Here's a couple of examples:-
Street People web slideshow (Default theme)
Street People web slideshow ('Lightflow' theme)

09:37

Fireworks displays evoke a lot of emotion as they are not only beautiful and spectacular to watch, but they also are often used to celebrate momentous occasions.

So, how to take photos of fireworks, well they aren't that difficult to photograph, and although it's best done with an SLR, there's a few tips here which describe how it can be done even with a compact camera.

01:21

Add a touch of glamour to your portraits. Use perspective to give your subject the appearance of longer legs, it's a simple trick that fashion photographers use all the time.

Watch this film to learn their little secret!

Section 10: How to take a really flattering Profile or PR photo
07:29

The first half of this discusses the Top Shade lighting technique, so you can safely skip the first half if you've already watched the Top Shade lecture.

This lecture describes a simple method of getting a beautiful light on your face, perfect for any type of close up portrait.This is something professional photographers use whenever they get the chance on location. It then discusses the background and shows ways of posing in a more relaxed and natural manner

03:55

This lecture shows some tricks for improving and refining the basic technique, small but subtle improvements can make a lot of difference.

Section 11: Which digital camera to buy next, megapixels is not the answer.
06:16

Never mind the quality, feel the width - remember that old saying?

Do more megapixels in a camera mean that the image quality is going to be better or is it just something the camera manufacturers just want you to believe?

Faced with a choice of several cameras that all look good, should you purchase the one with the most megapixels?

15:50

Great image quality from digital cameras is achieved via a combination of factors, e.g the lens quality, image processing, sensor size etc... The problem is you can't judge a lens or the camera's image processing just from looking at the camera.


But you can get a pretty good idea of the sensor's size and image quality just by knowing which category the camera falls into.

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Instructor Biography

Bernie Raffe AMPA, Award winning portrait & (ex) wedding photographer

** Voted by students as one of Udemy's outstanding instructors of 2014 **

Bernie is a professional photographer based in the UK, and has been passionate about photography ever since his parents bought him his first camera when he was just 11 years old (a Kodak Brownie 127)!

He's qualified as a photographer to 'Associate' level with both the MPA (Master Photographers Association), and the SWPP (Society of Wedding and Portrait Photographers) in the UK.

Bernie loves sharing his passion for photography, and students really enjoy his fun teaching style which has earned him over 100 five star reviews. These entertaining and informative films will demonstrate, without blinding you with science, how you can be a better photographer, taking more creative and dramatic photos that will wow your friends and family.

He is in demand as a speaker to other professionals and to beginner and keen amateurs at camera clubs... he's also an occasional guest speaker on cruise ships.

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