Game Changing Powerpoints
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Game Changing Powerpoints

A powerpoint blueprint to make your presentations clearer and more memorable
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0.0 (0 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
4 students enrolled
Created by Jason Teteak
Last updated 8/2017
English
Current price: $10 Original price: $100 Discount: 90% off
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Includes:
  • 2 hours on-demand video
  • 17 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Map out your message
  • Prepare your opening slides
  • Prepare your core content slides
  • Prepare your closing slides
  • Add variety to your visuals
  • Use pictures to add impact
  • Keep your graphics simple
  • Use illustrations to increase comprehension
  • Use handouts to reach every learner
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • Make sure to download the workbook to help you follow along with each lecture.
Description

Once you have created your irresistible menu and your tantalizing core content, your next task is to combine your words with slides and create a PowerPoint presentation.

By August 2012, it was estimated that 350 PowerPoint presentations are given each second across the globe. So the mere fact that you’re putting on a slide show in connection with your presentation isn’t very compelling. Certainly how it looks may set it apart, and I will discuss some techniques for making your graphics look good in chapter 4. But before you decide what kind of visuals you’ll use and when you’ll use them, you have to think about why you are using them.

In putting together a good presentation, here’s the critical point to remember: a slideshow is a visual aid. And that’s exactly how it should be used: not as a crutch, but as an aid— something that adds to your presentation. Many presenters make a huge mistake here.

Who is the target audience?
  • Presenters
  • Entrepreneurs
  • Sales professionals
  • Project managers
  • Team leads
  • Trainers
  • Teachers
  • Human resources managers
  • CEO's
Compare to Other Presentation Skills Courses
Curriculum For This Course
17 Lectures
01:58:25
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Introduction and Welcome
1 Lecture 02:52

Once you have created your irresistible menu and your tantalizing core content, your next task is to combine your words with slides and create a PowerPoint presentation.

By August 2012, it was estimated that 350 PowerPoint presentations are given each second across the globe. So the mere fact that you’re putting on a slide show in connection with your presentation isn’t very compelling. Certainly how it looks may set it apart, and I will discuss some techniques for making your graphics look good in chapter 4. But before you decide what kind of visuals you’ll use and when you’ll use them, you have to think about why you are using them.


Preview 02:52
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Map Out Your Message
7 Lectures 57:39

In putting together a good presentation, here’s the critical point to remember: a slideshow is a visual aid. And that’s exactly how it should be used: not as a crutch, but as an aid— something that adds to your presentation. Many presenters make a huge mistake here. 

Preview 14:09

These assure the audience they’re in the right place (because the title is onscreen) and remind them what they’re going to hear. You add the rest. This is what continues to hook your audience—when they have to listen to you to get the answer to their mystery. There are just two opening slides:

  • One title slide, which is onscreen when the audience enters the room

  • One main agenda slide, which lists all your takeaways

Prepare Your Opening Slides
09:09

It’s your turn to prepare your opening slides. 

Step One: Decide what the audience will see on the title slide.

Step Two: Decide what you will say in relation to the title slide. 

Step Three: Decide what the audience will see on the main agenda slide. 

Step Four: Decide what you will say in relation to the main agenda slide. 

Prepare Your Opening Slides Activity
04:07

The highlighted agenda slides serve mostly as placeholders so the audience knows what’s about to be discussed. The task slides summarize the main tasks involved in making the takeaway actionable, but you supply the details and describe subtasks and sub-subtasks as necessary. You’ll need to prepare:

  • Several highlighted agenda slides, one for each takeaway. Each of these is identical to the original agenda slide, but the takeaway coming up for discussion is highlighted so the audience members can keep track of where they are in the presentation.

  • Several task slides, one for each takeaway. Each of these lists the major tasks involved in achieving the takeaway to help the audience follow along as you explain how to make the takeaway immediate and actionable.

  • Optional number of example slides. These are slides that illustrate an example for a given takeaway. 

Prepare Your Core Content Slides
14:33

It’s your turn to prepare your core content slides. Use the blueprint pages you created in chapter 2.

Step One: Decide what the audience will see on the highlighted agenda slide. 

Step Two: Decide what you will say in relation to the highlighted agenda slide. 

Step Three: Decide what the audience will see on the task slide. 

Step Four: Decide what you will say in relation to the task slide.

Step Five: As needed: Prepare your example slides.

  • Decide what the audience will see on the example slide.
  • Decide what you will say in relation to the example slide.

Step Six: Repeat this process for each takeaway. 

Prepare Your Core Content Slides Activity
04:25

There are just two:

    • One summary slide, the next-to-last slide. It repeats the agenda to remind the audience of what they just got (though the actual brief recap of what they’ve learned comes from you.)

    • One final slide, which confirms that the presentation is over. It expresses thanks and gives contact information, and remains onscreen after you have left the stage. 

Prepare Your Closing Slides
05:53

It’s your turn to prepare your closing slides. 

Step One: Decide what the audience will see on the summary slide.

Step Two: Decide what you will say in relation to the summary slide. 

Step Three: Decide what the audience will see on the final slide. 

Step Four: Decide what you will say in relation to the final slide. 

Prepare Your Closing Slides Activity
05:23
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Add Variety to Your Visuals
9 Lectures 57:54

I disagree with presentation experts who focus on the visuals. That’s like saying you buy a Porsche for the paint job. Without the paint the car would still be irresistible because it’s impeccably designed, carefully put together, designed to make you comfortable, and capable of getting up to speed instantly. So is your presentation.

But just as the paint job on the Porsche is the finishing touch, the same is true of the visuals for your presentation. Take some time to put on the paint: 

Add Variety to Your Visuals Intro
05:51

There are many sources for pictures on the web. Search “stock photos” and a large number of sites will pop up. Look for up-to-date information about specific sites where you can find images available for a minimal fee or no fee. Read the information and licensing terms carefully. Copyright law governs the use and alteration of images. The words “royalty-free” mean you might pay a flat fee to use the image but you will not have to pay for each copy or use. The words “copyright-free” usually indicate that there is no charge for use and that you may be able to modify the image as you wish. 

Use Pictures to Add Impact
17:05

It’s your turn to use pictures to add impact.

Step One: Find the right image for your title slide. Choose key words you will use to search.

Step Two: Find an illustration for each task slide. Choose key words you will use to search.

Step Three: Prepare your final slide. 

Use Pictures to Add Impact Activity
03:40

There is no shortage of books on how to manipulate the text and the visuals on your PowerPoint slides, and I think you may find them useful. Here, I will point out only the essential points to keep in mind and share a few of the techniques I find most useful in making attractive, effective slides. 


Keep Graphics Simple
07:27

It’s your turn to keep your graphics simple. 

Step One: Check to be sure the text is legible on all your slides.

Step Two: Decide what you can do to add interest with basic tools.

Keep Graphics Simple Activity
02:41

Words alone aren’t always the best way to make your point. Illustrations allow you to present a lot of information at once. 


Use Illustrations to Increase Comprehension
07:02

It’s your turn to use diagrams to increase comprehension.

Step One: Look over your presentation and decide where you can use slides to do any of the following:

  • Present a large amount of information.

  • Present complex information.

  • Present step-by-step instructions.

  • Present any information more vividly.

  • Present information with graphs or charts. 

Use Illustrations to Increase Comprehension Activity
04:13

Before I began to address one group about giving presentations, I had overheard them debate the value of handouts, so I addressed the topic during my opening. “You may not be convinced of the value of handouts,” I said, “but I ask that each of you take one. Within fifteen minutes, at least half of you will be taking copious notes.”

At the fifteen-minute mark, I told them to look around. “I had suggested at least half of you would be taking notes by now—and you’ll see that’s happening.”

After this presentation, the debate was over. The company made a policy of preparing a handout for everyone and I believe you should do the same.

Of course, a side benefit of the handout is that you can put your contact information on it. Since a large percentage of your audience will be taking notes on the handout, they will no doubt be taking it home. 

Use Handouts to Reach Every Learner
08:23

Pictures, graphs, charts, and other visual devices, together with handouts, can help your audience get the big picture and sometimes make a point more efficiently than words.

Your Turn Activity
01:32
About the Instructor
Jason Teteak
4.7 Average rating
990 Reviews
10,554 Students
52 Courses
Author, Keynote & TEDx Speaker, CEO Rule the Room

Jason Teteak knows what it takes to Rule the Room. The master trainer and speaking presentation teacher has taught more than 50,000 people how to flawlessly command attention.

He’s won praise and a wide following for his original methods, his engaging style, and his knack for transferring communications skills via practical, simple, universal, and immediately actionable techniques.

Jason first made a reputation in the medical training industry, where he was known as “the presentation coach and trainer who trains the trainers.” Teteak’s attention to detail and precision in communicating definitive information was honed in serving this lifesaving industry.

In response to many requests, he began to offer personalized services and quickly developed a following as a private coach and a consultant whose clientele includes elite institutions, universities, and top corporate executives.

His new book, Rule the Room, was recently published in the summer of 2013. He has developed more than fifty presentation and communication training programs ranging in length from one hour to three days that serve as the basis for this unique, practical, and comprehensive course.