Fun with Beginner LEGO MindStorms EV3 Robotics.

Learning by Doing - Lego EV3 Robotics for the absolute beginner, build small robots and program them using EV3-G.
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  • Lectures 41
  • Contents Video: 2.5 hours
  • Skill Level Beginner Level
  • Languages English
  • Includes Lifetime access
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About This Course

Published 4/2014 English

Course Description

This is a robotics course for absolute beginners.

Over the last seven years we have had requests from grandparents, parents and teachers who claim to have no technical knowledge, that the free tutorials we have provided over the Internet be put together in a course that assumes absolutely no prior technical background, a course that they can use to help their middle school age grandchildren/children/students have fun with robots.

In this Robotics course for absolute beginners we try to answer that request, converting many of our free tutorials for use with Lego’s new EV3 MindStorms set. This course is about having fun building small Lego MindStorms EV3 robots, finding out how to command them to smile and speak, travel in straight and curved lines, and how to follow the edge of a line.

This mini-course includes about 2 hours of video tutorials. How long students take to complete this course varies enormously between students, but as a rough indication, we have used videos similar to these as the basis for about half of an 8-week, 2 hours per week after-school course for classes from Grade 5 to Grade 8, and for Adult Education and Parent/Child classes.

The course is structured as a “hands-on” “Learning-by-Doing” course, with new programming ideas introduced only when they are immediately needed by the robot. There is an absolute minimum of “talking-head” videos.

You will need to have access to a Lego MindStorms EV3 set. The course is suitable for both the Lego EV3 Education and the Lego EV3 Home sets. The course shows you how to download a free EV3-G Editor from Lego. This Lego Editor is suitable for both Windows and Apple computers, but does not work for Linux, tablets or smart phones. However the course videos can be played back on these devices, so that you can have the video directions available on a tablet right alongside your Lego set as you go through this course.

We have used the videos in this course during both individual and full-class lessons. The videos have also been used successfully by home study students.

The course includes downloadable arenas that can be printed out on A1 or A3 printers, for use during this course.

Enjoy!

What are the requirements?

  • Have access to either the Education or Home version of the Lego MindStorms EV3 set.

What am I going to get from this course?

  • By the end of this course you will have had fun building more than one small robot.
  • You will learn how to teach your Robot to do what you want it to do, using the programming language EV3-G.

What is the target audience?

  • Middle school students, plus others who are "young in heart"!

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee.

Forever yours.
Lifetime access.

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android.

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section 1: Lego MindStorms EV3 Robotics for Absolute Beginners - Learning by Doing.
02:46

This is an introduction to this series of Lego MindStorms EV3 video tutorials for beginners. It briefly outlines the scope of the tutorials, and introduces the team that produced these "learn-by-doing" videos lessons.

You can read a more detailed overview of the video contents of each section of this course in the attached pdf document, which can be downloaded and printed out on your own printer. However in summary, the overview is:

Section 1: This introduction.

Section 2: Building our First Lego Robot Botticelli

Section 3: Installing the LEGO Editing Software into your computer.

Section 4: Teaching our Robot Botticelli to move.

Section 5: Approaching an Alien (putting faces on your Robot and making him speak).

Section 6: Changing Botticelli into more the advanced Robot, LucyBot.

Section 7: Sending LucyBot Around the Moon! (Forwards and Curved Path Robot movement).

Section 8: Challenge: A Lego EV3 Robot Floor Cleaner? (Tight curves and precise movement)

Section 9: Building a new Robot, YayaBot.

Section 10: YayaBot Follows the Edge of a Line... (Traditional Artificial Intelligence Robot Task).

Section 11: Thank you - and the future?

Section 2: Building our First LEGO MindStorms EV3 Robot Botticelli!
00:35

To make sure that you can start using your robot as soon as possible, in Section 2 we build just about the simplest possible LEGO Robot that can actually move. It has two motors, two wheels, and two skids attached to the computer brick. We use two skids at the back of the Robot instead of wheels, because they are quicker to build. If you are impatient, remember that the next Robot we will build will have more than two wheels!

This tutorial will show you what our Robot, Botticelli, looks like. This way you can have an idea of where you are going.

01:52

This video shows you how to put the tires on their rims. We have a separate video of this, because tires that are not properly mounted on their rims are a common and significant problem when getting our robot to behave as we expect, later in this course. This is step 1 of 5 videos helping you build Botticelli.

01:54

We show you what the Lego motors look like, and show how to attach the tires to these motors.

This is step 2 of 5 videos helping you build Botticelli.

02:36

We take a look at the Computer Brick, and find out how to attach the motors to this brick.

This is step 3 of 5 videos helping you build Botticelli.

02:46

Two angled beams are attached to the Computer Brick, to act as a substitute for back wheels.

Lego has produced two versions of their EV3 set, a Home/Retail version, and an Education version. There are some differences in the set components. This will mean that in some sections of this course, we will have to have separate videos for the Home and Education sets.

In this step 4 we will not use separate videos for each set, but note that in the Lego EV3 Education set these angled beams will be white, but in the Lego EV3 Home set these angled beams will be black. Apart from the color, both beams are identical, so do not be worried about the color difference.

This is step 4 of 5 videos helping you build Botticelli.

02:19

Botticelli uses black Control Cables transmit commands from the Computer Brick to the Motors. This tutorial shows you how to correctly install them into Botticelli.

This is step 5 of 5 videos helping you build Botticelli.

Section 3: Getting the LEGO software
01:35

This video introduces you to the way Botticelli is controlled from your computer.

To enable you to control Botticelli (or any other robot), you will have to install some editing software produced by Lego into your desktop computer or laptop.

Lego has produced two versions of this editing software. In this series of videos we will be mainly using the Home/Retail version of this software, which Lego makes available without charge from their web site. In this Section 3 we will demonstrate how to download this software into your desktop or laptop.

Lego also has an Education version of this software, which can also be used for this introductory course. This needs to be purchased from Lego, and will usually be installed on to school computers by the local School Computer Technician. We will not demonstrate how to do this, because every school network seems to be different.

If you are wondering what the differences are between these two versions, a detailed comparison is beyond the scope of this tutorial. We will just say that they are both basically the same, but that the Education version includes some extra facilities including data-logging software which would seem to us to be marvelous for recording data in school science experiments. We have not yet tried the EV3 data-logging software, so we can not recommend it from personal experience. However we have used the older Lego MindStorms NXT version of this data-logging software in prize-winning science competition entries, and found that it makes data gathering SO much easier. Is it worth the money? That decision is up to you, but remember that either version of the editing softweare is fine for this introductory course.

04:51

If you are using the Education EV3 set, your School will have purchased this software and your school’s computer technician will probably have already installed this software on your computer.

If you are using the EV3 Home version, you will need to download and install the free EV3-G editing software from the Lego website. The software will work on up-to-date versions of Windows XP, Vista, 7 and 8, but not Windows RT. This tutorial shows you how to download the EV3-G editing software using a Windows 7 computer.

The software can also be downloaded for an Apple Macintosh OS 10.6, 10.7 and 10.8 with the latest Service packs, but since we do not own one, we can’t demonstrate exactly what to do – sorry. However (fingers crossed) the general actions should hopefully be quite similar to the Windows download process.

Section 4: How do we Teach Botticelli to do what we want him to do?
02:07

In Section 4 we:

Video 10: (This video) we find out how to plug in the cable that connects your computer to your Robot.

Video 11: Start up the LEGO EV3-G program editor, and put in one movement instruction,

Video 12: We show you how to update the EV3 computer brick firmware (this will only be necessary the first time you use your brick), followed by finding out where to mouse-click inside the EV3 editing program on our computer to send our program instruction via the cable into Botticelli. We then show you how to get Botticelli to move!

Video 13: We show you how to save your program, to make sure you can use it again later.

02:27

We start up the LEGO software, and find out how to type in a movement command that will later be obeyed by Botticelli.

04:29

If you are using the LEGO EV3 computer brick for the first time, it will be necessary to update the EV3 brick's firmware to the current version; we show you how to do this. Updates of this sort will usually only be necessary each time Lego produces a new version of the EV3 computer brick's firmware (which is generally not very often).

Next we plug Botticelli in to our laptop, download the Video 11 movement command, and Botticelli springs into life! Yi!!

03:37

It is usually difficult to get people to save their program in versions - until we lose a complicated program and have to type it in again! Best to get into good habits early…

Section 5: Approaching an Alien...
00:51

The purpose of Section 5 is to make our Robot move a controlled distance, put a facial expression on the Robot, and make the Robot speak.

The scenario we have chosen is that an Alien Ambassador has come to Earth, we don't know whether the Alien is dangerous or not, so we will send our Robot to approach the Alien instead of a human, because if anything goes wrong it will be a Robot and not a person that will be zapped. You will need to figure out how far to send a Robot so that it does not collide with the Alien Ambassador and start an intergalactic war! Before the Robot starts, it should have a nice friendly smile on its face. When the Robot reaches the Alien Ambassador, we want our Robot to say a polite ”Hello ”, and we hope that the Alien’s Universal Translator is working. We've had trouble in the past finding Alien Universal Translators that work, so mostly we have just had to tell a Robot to look disappointed, say a polite “Goodbye”, and come back to its starting point.

It takes a while to get these instructions just right, but it is worth spending the time to get the instructions close to perfect, as these skills will be really useful later on.

Video 14: (This Video) Overview - Approaching an Alien.

Video 15: Put a Smile on Botticelli's Face

Video 16: Botticelli Goes Towards the Alien

Video 17: Botticelli says "Hello" to the Alien and waits for a reply.

Video 18: Botticelli says "Thank You" and "Goodbye" to the Alien.

Video 19: Botticelli sadly races back home to safety!

02:55

In this video we find out how to put a Smile on Botticelli's Face - it is a good idea to try to show the Alien we are friendly!

This is step 1 of 5 in this Alien Ambassador Challenge.

02:00

In this video we try to carefully approach the Alien without knocking it over and maybe killing it, possibly starting an intergalactic war!

We could calculate the number of wheel rotations by measuring the distance between Botticelli's starting position and the Alien's red carpet with a piece of string, and then wrap the string around Botticelli's wheel to find out how many wheel rotations this distance would equal. We could then put that number of wheel rotations in Botticelli's program, send Botticelli towards the Alien, and hope hope hope that we have the program right and that we do not damage the Alien. This is a nervous time...

This is step 2 of 5 in this Alien Ambassador Challenge.

04:00

Botticelli says "Hello" to the Alien, changes his welcoming grin to a gentle smile, and waits patiently for a reply. We just hope that the Alien's Universal Translator is working.

This is step 3 of 5 in this Alien Ambassador Challenge.

03:19

Botticelli says "Thank You" and "Goodbye" to the Alien.

Oh dear. The Alien has not replied. Perhaps the batteries in the Alien's Universal Translator need to be replaced? Well, what can we do? Perhaps we had better come home and have a think about what to do next.

Let us find out how to make Botticelli Botticelli say "Thank You" and "Goodbye" to the Alien.

This is step 4 of 5 in this Alien Ambassador Challenge.

01:53

Botticelli sadly races back home to safety!

With no response from the Alien, Botticelli feels nervous. Who knows, perhaps the Alien's silence could be due to it charging up deadly laser beams. It is safest for Botticelli to retreat rapidly back to the safety of our starting point - this video shows you how to show Botticelli the way back to safety, away from the Alien.

This is step 5 of 5 in this Alien Ambassador Challenge.

Section 6: Changing Botticelli into a more advanced Robot, LucyBot.
03:03

The purpose of Section 6 is to change Botticelli into a more versatile Robot that has a swiveling rear wheel.

The Robot we are changing Botticelli into is our youngest delightful new Robot called LucyBot. She is a more complicated Robot than the Botticelli. She will take longer to build, but this build will give you more practice in 3-D visualization and 3-D manipulation as you complete building LucyBot.

We believe it is important that our students create and program many different Robots during this course, because Robotics is not just about the Practical Skill of Building, not just about the Science of Programming, but it is about learning the Engineering Skill of finding out how to make the whole lot work together really well. Both your students and you will find that there is a lot of difference between the theory of computer programming, and what your Robots will actually do in practice - in other words the students will learn the Engineering Skill of dealing with the real, imperfect world (not some advertised ideal world); this could be the start of developing a "coping skill" that can be a lot of use in later life!

Video 20: Changing new EV3 Robot LucyBot's motors.

Video 21: EV3 EDUCATION SET ONLY - Building LucyBot's back wheel.

Video 22: EV3 HOME SET ONLY - Building LucyBot's back wheels.

This is step 1 of 2 in changing Botticelli into LucyBot.

03:26

This is step 2 of 2 in changing Botticelli into LucyBot.

One of the reasons we are adding a back wheel to LucyBot is that we found that some schools where we were voluntarily assisting teachers, had an unusual carpet that had a "ridged" surface. When Botticelli tried to go backwards, his back beams sometimes caught in these ridges.

LucyBot will not have this problem, as she has a back ball bearing that does not catch in small ridges. Using this ball bearing has the advantage that the ball bearing will also permit LucyBot to move her hips sideways as well as forwards and backwards, making LucyBot a nimbler Robot than Botticelli.

The reason we have separate tutorials for the EV3 Education and the EV3 Home sets is that Lego has supplied different components in each set. The Education set has a ball bearing that is not in the Home set. The Home set has two small wheels that are not in the Education set. This means we have to have separate "back wheel" builds for each set, resulting in little LucyBot being a very versatile Robot, more so than Botticelli, as she meets the needs of both the Education and Home sets. Who was it who said that women are more versatile than men? Hmmmm...

05:58

This is step 2 of 2 in changing Botticelli into LucyBot.

One of the reasons we are adding a back wheel to LucyBot is that we found that some schools where we were voluntarily assisting teachers, had an unusual carpet that had a "ridged" surface. When Botticelli tried to go backwards, his back beams sometimes caught in these ridges.

LucyBot will not have this problem, as she has swiveling rear wheels that do not catch in small ridges. These swiveling wheels also have the advantage that they will permit LucyBot to move her "hips" sideways as well as forwards and backwards, making LucyBot a nimbler Robot than Botticelli.

The reason we have separate tutorials for the EV3 Education and the EV3 Home sets is that Lego has supplied different components in each set. The Education set has a ball bearing that is not in the Home set. The Home set has two small wheels that are not in the Education set. This means we have to have separate "back wheel" builds for each set, resulting in little LucyBot being a very versatile Robot, more so than Botticelli, as she meets the needs of both the Education and Home sets. Who was it who said that women are more versatile than men? Hmmmm...

Section 7: Sending LucyBot Around the Moon!
02:07

Sending LucyBot around the Moon!

The purpose of this tutorial is to gain practice in sending LucyBot in a controlled straight-line distance, and teaching her to travel in a gentle controlled curve.

The scenario in this case is that LucyBot leaves the Earth, goes out to one side of side of the Moon, goes around the Moon, and comes back to land safely on Earth. The nice thing about this tutorial is that it is just about impossible to get right the first time, and therefore guarantees that you will have quite a bit of practice in understanding how to use the “straight line” and “curve” commands before you complete this Challenge. If you look at the “student videos” section of the Lego MindStorms NXT version of this tutorial (see either http://www.drgraeme.net/DrGraeme-free-NXT-G-tutorials/Ch12/Ch12V1G/StudentVideos/StudentVideo.htm or http://goo.gl/bJWH3G ), you will see an incredible array of variations that other students have used to solve this challenge in the past. It is worth trying to copy at least one (or more) of these variations using your EV3 set, before proceeding to the next Section 8 of this course; because your extra practice will have the effect of reinforcing your understanding of the commands that control LucyBot, and how LucyBot responds when given those commands.

Video 23: (This video) Around the Moon - Overview

Video 24: Sending LucyBot into Space.

Video 25: Teaching LucyBot to Curve Around the Moon.

Video 26: Getting LucyBot safely back to Earth.

02:13

We want to send LucyBot into Space.

How can we teach LucyBot to leave the starting place on our pretend Earth, go into space, and stop just about alongside our pretend moon? To find the number of wheel rotations necessary to go this distance, you could use the string method we mentioned in the discussion about lesson 16, or is there a different way you could find the number of wheel rotations?

This is step 1 of 3 of the "Around the Moon" Challenge.

01:56

Teaching LucyBot to Curve Around the Moon.

How can we teach LucyBot to travel in a curved path around our pretend Moon? We would like LucyBot to end up pointing right back towards our pretend Earth. Would we have to teach LucyBot to use different powers for each of her motors? How many wheel rotations would we need to tell LucyBot to use to do this just right, pointing back towards Earth? This looks like fun!

02:07

Getting LucyBot safely back to Earth.

This is step 3 of 3 of the "Around the Moon" Challenge.

Let us now teach LucyBot to go straight back to land on our pretend Earth. If she stops with any part of her body over the pretend Earth, we count that as a successful landing. You will need many attempts to teach LucyBot the best number of commands for a safe landing. Did your first attempt stop anywhere near the Earth, or did LucyBot end up going off towards Mars or Venus? Space travel has so many options....

As we mentioned before, if you look at the “student videos” section of the Lego MindStorms NXT version of this tutorial (see either http://www.drgraeme.net/DrGraeme-free-NXT-G-tutorials/Ch12/Ch12V1G/StudentVideos/StudentVideo.htm or http://goo.gl/bJWH3G ), you will see an incredible array of variations that other students have used to solve this challenge in the past. It is worth trying to copy at least one (or more) of these variations using your EV3 set, before proceeding to the next Section 8 of this course; because your extra practice will have the effect of reinforcing your understanding of the commands that control LucyBot, and how LucyBot responds when given those commands. All good fun...

Section 8: Challenge: A Lego EV3 Robot Floor Cleaner?
01:27

Challenge: A Lego EV3 Robot Floor Cleaner?

The purpose of this tutorial is to give you more practice in sending LucyBot through controlled straight-line distances, but with the variation that very tight curves are needed to solve this challenge. Note that this is a "Challenge", and that an exact solution is not given.

In this scenario a “floor” is divided into squares, and to “clean” this floor a Robot must pass over each square. The squares can be passed in any order. To help you think about how you will plan to clean your pretend floor, we have included videos showing past student's solutions when they were using Robots made with the previous Lego NXT sets; some Robots are successful, some are not. You will see in videos 28 to 31 that there are many different ways to solve this Challenge. It is interesting that at Grade 5 or 6 level we have noticed that there is often a different approach between boys and girls in this Challenge. Often boys will charge ahead and get it done quickly and roughly, but often girls think about it beforehand, and sketch out a more intelligent approach which only covers each square once. Hmmm…

How do you plan to help LucyBot solve this Challenge ?

Note: Since this is a “Challenge”, an exact solution is not given, although the sample runs shown in Videos 28 to 31 will help you think about ways to solve this Challenge, and hints are offered in Video 32.

Video 27: (This video) Overview: A Lego EV3 Robot Floor Cleaner?

Video 28: Two examples of Floor Cleaner Runs from Margate School.

Video 29: Five examples of Floor Cleaner Runs from Huonville School.

Video 30: Four Floor Cleaner Runs from a TAG Workshop.

Video 31: Two Floor Cleaner Runs from Mt. Nelson School.

Video 32: Hints for Solving the Floor Cleaner Challenge.

00:48

These are two particularly interesting runs from students at Margate School back in 2008. It is a bit hard to see, but in the first run you may notice that this student has his Robot's back wheels sideways(!) When I have more time later, I will add an explanation of why this seemingly weird design decision is a better solution in this particular case than having them mounted in the usual forwards direction. Can you guess why this is a good idea? (This is a very hard question, so don't be upset if you can't think of a reason!)

The second robot is a very nice compact design, but like most tall and thin robots, it has a bit of a problem staying upright...

02:20

Clare and the students at Huonville were very kind in that they let me use some of their not-so-good runs, as well as some of their excellent runs. If you are like me, you will have lots of not-so-good runs, many more than the excellent runs. However each time I have an imperfect run. I can see that it is usually a better run that the run before, so I am making good progress, improving most of the time. Each time I improve, I learn something. I can also learn something when things go wrong! It is usually true that experience is valuable (as long as the experience is not dangerous). The more experience you have, the more practice you have, the better your results will be. All of these students improved and obtained good floor cleaner results. See if you can figure out what their mistaks were, and what you could do to avoid these mistakes.

01:17

In this after-school workshop, each team decided to teach their robots to clean the floor in different patterns. These videos show three of the patterns their Robots used.

01:39

Mount Nelson School has an enviable record in RoboCup Junior Rescue, having won many State and several National events. You can see some of the quality of their student's work by noting how beautifully the Robots run almost exactly parallel to the lines separating the rectangles in the pretend floor arena.

Can you teach LucyBot to clean the pretend floor like this?

04:35

Hints for Solving the Floor Cleaner Challenge.

In this video we show you sample runs using both Botticelli and LucyBot. We also take a brief look at some programming hints. However we want to leave solving this Challenge up to you and your skills. Good luck - and have fun teaching your floor cleaner to clean well!

Section 9: Building a new Robot, YayaBot.
01:20

The purpose of this tutorial is to build an even more versatile Robot that can serve as a platform for the use of multiple sensors, such as a Color Sensor.

We will build an even more complicated Robot, YayaBot, and will attach a Color Sensor to her. We will use the Color Sensor when teaching YayaBot to follow the edge of a line in Section 10.

YayaBot was originally built as a SUMO robot, and she is more complicated and will take more time to build than either Botticelli or LucyBot. We do not cover SUMO in the first version of this course (by the time you read this, we may have added a SUMO tutorial at http://www.drgraeme.org/EV3/EV3.html ), however even without SUMO we will find YayaBot useful in the next section 10, when we teach her to follow the edge of a line.

As we have commented before, the reason we have separate tutorials for the EV3 Education (video 35) and the EV3 Home sets (video 36) is that Lego has supplied different components in each set. The Education set has a ball bearing that is not in the Home set. The Home set has two small wheels that are not in the Education set. This means we have to have separate "back wheel" builds for each set, resulting in YayaBot also being a very versatile Robot, meeting the needs of both the Education and Home sets.

Video 33: (This video) Building YayaBot - Overview

Video 34: Building YayaBot, Part 1.

Video 35: EV3 EDUCATION SET ONLY - Building YayaBot, Part 2.

Video 36: EV3 HOME SET ONLY - Building YayaBot, Part 2.

22:49

Building YayaBot, Part 1.

In this video we will show you how to build YayaBot, up until the stage when it is time to add the back "wheel" to YayaBot. This portion of the build will be the same for both the Education and Home sets (with the exception that some of the colors of some of the Lego components may be different - this is OK because despite the difference in colors, they work the same way).

As commented before, the different contents of the Education and Home sets mean that the Part 2 builds of YayaBot are slightly different for each set. If you have the Education set, go straight on the Video 35, and ignore video 36. If you have the Home set, ignore Video 35, and go straight on to video 36.

13:46

EV3 EDUCATION SET ONLY - Building YayaBot, Part 2.

In this video we will show you how to finish our YayaBot build using the EV3 Education set. This video offers you the opportunity to add an ultrasonic sensor to Yaya Bot, as well as a Color sensor. You are welcome to add the Ultrasonic sensor to YayaBot for practice in building, but we will not use the Ultrasonic sensor in any tutorial in this version of this course (although by the time you read this, we may have added a tutorial using this sensor at http://www.drgraeme.org/EV3/EV3.html ).

After completing YayaBot, ignore video 36 which is for the Home set only, and go on to Section 10 video 37 to start teaching YayaBot to follow the edge of a line.

07:53

EV3 HOME SET ONLY - Building YayaBot, Part 2.

In this video we will show you how to finish our YayaBot build using the EV3 Home set.

After completing YayaBot, go on to Section 10 video 37 and start teaching YayaBot to follow the edge of a line.

Section 10: YayaBot Follows the Edge of a Line...
02:04

The purpose of this tutorial is to teach YayaBot to follow the edge of a line using her one Color Sensor.

Following a line is a classic problem in Robotics. In Section 10 we learn to follow the edge of a line using one EV3 Color Sensor. It is important that there is a clear distinction in shade between the background color and the line itself. We learn how to teach YayaBot to follow both straight and curved edges of lines.

Looking ahead, this skill has a potential use in competitions such as the RoboCup Junior event. Often in RoboCup Junior, we use Robots with two Light or Color sensors; this is not covered in this version of this course, but there is information on line following for the older Lego NXT robots that use two light Sensors at http://www.drgraeme.net/DrGraeme-free-NXT-G-tutorials/ChV4.htm Challenge 102, which might be useful as an "ideas-starter" for your EV3 programming.

If you want more practice in line following using bigger arenas, the web site http://www.DrGraeme.org/EV3/C5/C5.html contains videos that show how to set up tape mazes suitable for use by line-following Lego NXT or EV3 Robots; to see them click on tutorials C5.1 and C5.2. There are also downloadable line templates available at tutorial C5.3; these can be used to set up a maze or circuit suitable for line-following by either a Lego NXT or EV3 Robot; these templates can be printed on an A3 printer.

However, all these are in the future - let us go on now to find out how to teach YayaBot to follow the edge of a line in video 38.

Video 37: (This video) Overview - YayaBot follows the Edge of a Line.

Video 38: YayaBot's Color Sensor can see the difference between black and white.

Video 39: Programming YayaBot to Follow the Edge of a Line (Part 1).

Video 40: Programming YayaBot to Follow the Edge of a Line (Part 2).

01:47

YayaBot's Color Sensor can see the difference between black and white.

In this video we find out how YayaBot can sense the edge of a line, using the readings that YayaBot gets from her Color Sensor. There will be low Color Sensor readings over black lines, higher readings over white surfaces. We will find out how to use these different reading in the next Video.

06:25

Programming YayaBot to Follow the Edge of a Line (Part 1).

In this video we show you how to set up the first part of an edge-following computer program, using commands that will hopefully teach YayaBot to start from a white surface, and find the edge of a black line. We test our instructions by downloading them to YayaBot, and starting YayaBot. We get a result that is not exactly what we had hoped, and hopefully in Part 2 of this effort in video 40, we will find out how to fix this problem.

04:34

Programming YayaBot to Follow the Edge of a Line (Part 2).

In this video we show you how fix the problem we found in the previous video 39, and how to set up the rest of an edge-following computer program that will hopefully teach YayaBot to follow the edge of a black line. We test our instructions by downloading them to YayaBot, and starting YayaBot. We get a good result on a straight line, but YayaBot leaves the line when she finds a curve in the line. We then take a further look at the commands we gave YayaBot in our edge-following Computer program, make some changes that we hope will allow YayaBot to turn a little more quickly, download this new version of the program into YayaBot, and start another run. We find a result that is very good, actually much better than I would have expected for a Robot than is not a specialist line-following Robot, so I'm really pleased with YayaBot!

We do not look at specialist line-following Robots in this version of this course, but some classes we have worked with in the past using the older Lego NXT Robots, have had success with Robot variations based roughly on ClareBot, (see http://www.drgraeme.net/DrGraeme-free-NXT-G-tutorials/Ch48/Ch48V1BCG/default.htm if you have a PC, or http://www.drgraeme.net/DrGraeme-free-NXT-G-tutorials/ClareBot/default.htm if you have an Apple ) which might be an idea-starter for your next EV3 build. You can also see some of Yaya's past NXT line-folowing Robots at: http://www.yayalu.net/YayaLu2007/YayaLu07.htm, and also on her 2008 web page, plus "Black Beauty" on her 2009 page.

As commented before, if you want more practice in line following using bigger arenas, the web site http://www.DrGraeme.org/EV3/C5/C5.html contains videos that show how to set up tape mazes suitable for use by line-following Lego NXT or EV3 Robots; to see them click on tutorials C5.1 and C5.2. There are also downloadable line templates available at tutorial C5.3; these can be used to set up a maze or circuit suitable for line-following by either a Lego NXT or EV3 Robot; these templates can be printed on an A3 printer.

That completes the tutorials in this short EV3 course. Go to video 41 to tidy up the loose ends. As we commented at the start of this course, this course is an experiment for our team, and if you want more videos of this sort from our team, send an email to Ying.Chen@utas.edu.au with the subject "EV3 Tutorial". All requests will be carefully considered, and if there is sufficient demand, and if we can get permission to allocate the necessary time, we may provide more tutorials for your pleasure and education. Have fun with your EV3 Robots!

Section 11: Thank you
01:22

Thank you for watching our videos. We hope you had fun with them, and that you learned a lot.

As we have commented before, this short course is an experiment for our team, and if you want more videos of this sort from our team, send an email to Ying.Chen@utas.edu.au with the subject "EV3 Tutorial". All your requests will be carefully considered, and if there is sufficient demand, and if we can get permission to allocate the necessary time, we may provide more tutorials for your pleasure and education. Thank you for listening to our videos, we had fun putting them together, and we hope you had fun using them with your EV3 Robots!

Best wishes,

From Ying, Yaya and Graeme

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Instructor Biography

For several years since retiring, I have had a lot of fun working on a voluntary basis with a group led by Ying Chen. This group has, as one of its aims, the spread of technical knowledge amongst School Students using a robotics program that introduces building and programming skills. Seeing the success achieved by students of this program has been a continuing delight, and I feel privileged to be associated with this group.

My background before retiring was about 1/3 of my life lecturing at various Universities in Computer Science, Information Systems and Engineering subjects. The 1/3 before that I was a full-time single parent caring for my children. In the first third of my working life I was an Engineer working for an Electricity Authority that produced all the electricity for my home state with negligible carbon dioxide output.

I also spent two years working in S.E. Asia as a volunteer with the Australian Volunteers Abroad.

My academic qualifications are B.E., B.A., Ph.D., M.I.E.Aust., M.I.E.E.E..

Instructor Biography

Yaya has been playing with Lego robots since 2006. Since then she has achieved robotics success in State, National and World events, including:

Two World RoboCup Junior Firsts (the Rescue category in Austria and the Dance category in Singapore); first place in the senior category of the Australian RoboGals competition; the highest Australian School CSIRO award - the Gold CREST; the highest Australian School Science Award - first place in the BHP-Billiton Engineering Award; among 1600 of the brightest students from 72 countries at ISEF in Arizona USA she gained a first Citation Award; she was invited to Google’s Australia-New Zealand Anita Borg Scholarship retreat; and she gave an oral presentation of her paper at the IEEE Fifth Biomedical International Conference in Thailand.

Outside robotics, Yaya has represented Tasmania in the Pride of Australia Medal, was a finalist in the Tasmanian division of the Young Australian of the Year, was invited to address the Tasmanian Parliament at their Annual Science Forum, has achieved a 99th percentile in the National Mathematics test; and has won prizes and medals in Piano and Judo when younger. She is currently studying the International Baccalaureate, has taken one of these two-year subjects a year early and obtained a 7, and hopes at the end of this year to get a result good enough to be offered a place at a University in 2015.

Instructor Biography

Ying Chen has had an interest in Lego robots and robotics since 2006, working quietly in the background to help and guide her group in efforts to spread technical knowledge among young students. The program she has overseen has been associated with voluntary assistance to robotics programs in a variety of schools and community groups, and has produced several web sites that have made free robotics tutorial material available worldwide, resulting in millions of hits from over 150 countries and translations of robotics-related web pages into over 40 languages. Students associated with this program have won multiple State, Country, and World first places in robotics-related events. The group's latest project is this introductory mini-robotics course for absolute beginners using Lego's new EV3 MindStorms sets, produced with assistance from Google.

Ying Chen is a lecturer in Information Systems at the University of Tasmania.

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