Extreme Weather 101

Preparing for the Impacts of Extreme Weather & Climate Change
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  • Lectures 25
  • Length 1 hour
  • Skill Level Beginner Level
  • Languages English
  • Includes Lifetime access
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    Available on iOS and Android
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About This Course

Published 3/2015 English

Course Description

Hurricanes, droughts, tornadoes, snowstorms, flooding…extreme weather can happen at any time, anywhere and it affects all of us. In 2014, the United States experienced eight weather and climate disasters with losses exceeding one billion dollars each, including drought in the West, five severe storm events, flooding in Michigan and the Northeast, and a winter storm that affected the Midwest, Northeast and Southeast.

In this course, you will learn "the basics" about extreme weather and climate change. Through videos, quizzes and toolkits with tips and links to trusted resources, you will learn more about:

  • how scientists know the climate is changing and how climate change impacts extreme weather;
  • national and regional extreme weather trends in the United States over various time scales;
  • projected changes in extreme weather in the United States;
  • the health and environmental impacts of extreme weather and climate change;
  • how to prepare yourself and your family for the impacts of extreme weather and climate change.


What are the requirements?

  • All you need is an interest in weather and climate!

What am I going to get from this course?

  • By the end of this course, you will understand the relationship between climate change and extreme weather.
  • You will be able to describe historical weather trends and projections for the future.
  • You will have access to tips and tools to help you prepare for extreme weather events that may occur where you live.

What is the target audience?

  • This course is for anyone interested in learning "the basics" about extreme weather, climate change and preparedness.

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee.

Forever yours.
Lifetime access.

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android.

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section 1: Welcome
Welcome to Extreme Weather 101
01:10
Section 2: The Basics
00:56

Learn the difference between "weather" and "climate."

04:13

Learn about the difference between "climate change" and "global warming," understand how scientists study climate change, and explore global climate and weather trends.

03:23

Learn how climate change influences the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events.

4 questions

Answer these multiple choice questions about material covered in the Weather and Climate, Climate Change and Global Warming, and Understanding the Extreme Weather-Climate Change Relationship lectures.

Section 3: Regional Climate Trends in the United States
Regional Climate Trends in the United States
Article
2 questions

This is an open-book quiz to help you learn more about climate change and extreme weather in the Northeast region of the United States, which is home 64 million people. The Northeast contains some of the most developed areas in the world, as well as critical agricultural lands across more than 180,000 farms.

The Northeast region includes: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire, West Virginia and the District of Columbia.

Use the National Climate Assessment to help you answer these questions. Copy and paste this link into a new browser window to get started: http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/highlights/regions/northeast

3 questions

This is an open-book quiz to help you learn more about climate change and extreme weather in the Southeast region of the United States. From the Appalachian Mountains down to the coastal plains, this region is home to more than 80 million people and attracts hundreds of millions more visitors every year. The Southeast has also experienced the most billion-dollar weather and climate disasters in the country.

The Southeast region includes: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Use the National Climate Assessment to help you with these questions. Copy and paste this link into a new browser window to get started: http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/highlights/regions/southeast

3 questions

This is an open-book quiz to help you learn more about climate change and extreme weather events in the Midwest region of the United States. While more than two thirds of this region is comprised of agricultural lands, the area is also home to forests and the Great Lakes, as well as more than 61 million people and eight of the nation's 50 most populous cities. In 2011, 11 of the 14 weather-related billion-dollar disasters that struck the United States affected the Midwest region.

The Midwest region includes: Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin.

Use the National Climate Assessment to help you with these questions. Copy and paste this link into your browser to get started: http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/highlights/regions/midwest

3 questions

This is an open-book quiz to help you learn more about climate change and extreme weather events in the Great Plains region of the United States. From the flat plains to more than 5,000 feet in elevation in the mountain ranges of the Continental Divide, this region is quite large and encompasses a wide diversity of climates, with temperature extremes ranging from -70°F in Montana to 121°F in North Dakota and Kansas. Although more than 80 percent of the area in this region is devoted to agriculture, forests, marshes, rangeland and desert can also be found.

The Great Plains region includes: Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas and Wyoming.

Use the National Climate Assessment to help you with these questions. Copy and paste this link into a new browser window to get started: http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/highlights/regions/great-plains
3 questions

This is an open-book quiz to help you learn more about climate change and extreme weather in the Southwest region of the United States. The Southwest is home to 56 million people and has the highest concentration of people living in cities out of all of the National Climate Assessment regions. Although the Southwest is the hottest and driest region in the country, it also contains the nation's largest ocean-based economy, estimated at $46 billion annually, and produces more than half of the country's high-value specialty crops.

The Southwest region includes: Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah.

Use the National Climate Assessment to help you with these questions. Copy and paste this link into a new browser window to get started: http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/highlights/regions/southwest

2 questions

This is an open-book quiz to help you learn more about climate change and extreme weather in the Northwest region of the United States. Although it contains only a few states, this region has a wide diversity of environments, from volcanic mountains to rocky shorelines to high sage deserts. Natural resources are important to the Northwest's economy—the region is the world-leader in tree fruit production and is home to 55 percent of potato, 15 percent of wheat, and 11 percent of milk production in the country, totaling $17 billion in agricultural commodities. The more than 4,400 miles of coastline are used as economic centers and important habitats, and provided the people of the Northwest with $480 million in commercial fish and shellfish resources in 2011.

States in this region include: Idaho, Oregon and Washington.

Use the National Climate Assessment to help you with these questions. Copy and paste this link into a new browser window to get started: http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/highlights/regions/northwest

3 questions

This is an open-book quiz to help you learn more about climate change and extreme weather in Alaska. Alaska is home to 40 percent of the federally recognized native tribes in the country. The only arctic region in the United States, Alaska also contains marine, tundra, boreal forest and rainforest ecosystems, which support millions of migratory birds, hundreds of thousands of caribou, half of the nation's fish catch and 81 percent of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Although rural Alaska is one of the most extensive areas of the poverty in the country in terms of household income, its residents pay the highest prices for food and fuel.

The Alaska region includes the state of Alaska and its surrounding waters.

Use the National Climate Assessment to help you with these questions. Copy and paste this link into a new browser window to get started: http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/highlights/regions/alaska

3 questions

This is an open-book quiz to help you learn more about climate change and extreme weather events in Hawai'i and the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Islands. Composed of more than 2,000 islands, this region contains a diverse array of environments, from alpine systems to tropical rainforests to atolls to millions of miles of ocean. The people of this region are equally diverse; at least 20 languages are spoken across the region by indigenous Pacific Islanders and immigrants to the area.

This region includes Hawai'i, the Territory of Guam, the Territory of American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Republic of Palau, the Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

Use the National Climate Assessment to help you with these questions. Copy and paste this link into a new browser window to get started: http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/highlights/regions/hawaii

Section 4: Extreme Weather in a Changing Climate
Overview
Article
Basic Preparedness Toolkit
1 page
Section 5: Extreme Heat in a Changing Climate
02:41

Learn about the frequency and intensity of extreme heat events in a warming climate, and what scientists expect in the future.

Extreme Heat Preparedness Toolkit
1 page
3 questions

Answer these multiple choice questions about material covered in both the Extreme Heat in a Changing Climate lecture and the Extreme Heat Preparedness Toolkit.

Section 6: Extreme Cold & Winter Storms in a Changing Climate
02:32

Learn about the frequency and intensity of extreme cold and winter storms in a warming climate, and what scientists expect in the future.

Extreme Cold & Winter Storms Preparedness Toolkit
1 page
3 questions

Answer these multiple choice questions about material covered in both the Extreme Cold and Winter Storms in a Changing Climate lecture and the Extreme Cold and Winter Storms Preparedness Toolkit.

Section 7: Extreme Precipitation in a Changing Climate
02:32

Learn about the frequency and intensity of heavy precipitation events in a warming climate, and what scientists expect in the future.

1 page

3 questions

Answer these multiple choice questions about material covered in both the Extreme Precipitation and Flooding in a Changing Climate lecture and the Extreme Precipitation and Flooding Preparedness Toolkit.

Section 8: Atlantic Hurricanes in a Changing Climate
03:17

Learn about the frequency and intensity of Atlantic hurricanes in a warming climate, and what scientists expect in the future.

Hurricane Preparedness Toolkit
1 page
3 questions

Answer these multiple choice questions about material covered in both the Atlantic Hurricanes in a Changing Climate lecture and the Hurricanes Preparedness Toolkit.

Section 9: Thunderstorms & Tornadoes in a Changing Climate
02:32

Learn about the frequency and intensity of thunderstorms and tornadoes in a warming climate, and what scientists expect in the future.

Thunderstorms Preparedness Toolkit
1 page
Tornadoes Preparedness Toolkit
1 page
4 questions

Answer these multiple choice questions about material covered in the Thunderstorms & Tornadoes in a Changing Climate lecture, the Thunderstorms Preparedness Toolkit and the Tornadoes Preparedness Toolkit.

Section 10: Drought in a Changing Climate
02:02

Learn about the frequency and intensity of drought and wildfires in a warming climate, and what scientists expect in the future.

Drought Preparedness Toolkit
1 page
Wildfire Preparedness Toolkit
1 page
4 questions

Answer these multiple choice questions about material covered in the Drought in a Changing Climate lecture, the Drought Preparedness Toolkit and the Wildfires Preparedness Toolkit.

Section 11: Conclusion
Conclusion
00:32
References
4 pages
Visual References
10 pages
Section 12: BONUS LECTURE: New course, Dealing with Drought, now available
Article

We have a new course available, called Dealing with Drought. If you enjoyed this course or want to learn more about the current drought in the West, this is the course for you!

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Instructor Biography

The National Environmental Education Foundation (NEEF) is the nation's leading organization in lifelong environmental learning, connecting people to knowledge they use to improve the quality of their lives and the health of the planet. This is achieved by providing knowledge to trusted professionals and other leaders who, with their credibility, amplify messages to national audiences to solve environmental problems. Our vision is that “By 2022, 300 million Americans will actively use environmental knowledge to ensure the well-being of the earth and its people."

NEEF partners with non-profit organizations, businesses, schools and federal agencies that are trusted by the U.S. public and can—through joint ventures with NEEF—credibly convey environmental knowledge to live by. NEEF's programs focus on the four key areas that are priorities for the American public—Weather and Climate, Health, Public Lands, Education.

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