Post-Game Analysis For Presenters
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Post-Game Analysis For Presenters

Clearly Evaluate Your Presentation Success
New
0.0 (0 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
4 students enrolled
Created by Jason Teteak
Last updated 8/2017
English
Current price: $10 Original price: $50 Discount: 80% off
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Includes:
  • 1 hour on-demand video
  • 5 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Design your evaluation survey
  • Ask free-text questions about the presenter
  • Ask them to rate the presenter and the presentation
  • Find out if they recommend the presenter
  • Produce your evaluation survey
  • Color code the ratings
  • Give clear and discrete choices
  • Interpret your evaluation surveys
  • Focus on the good stuff
  • Separate what you can and can't control
  • Give the right benchmarks
  • Hook the benchmark
  • Give the benchmark directional
  • Go over the answer
  • Find out who is correct
  • Praise and encourage them
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • Make sure to download the workbook to help you follow along with each lecture.
Description

If you’re able to take the presentation you’ve designed and built and find out if audience learned what they needed to learn, then no matter who walks out or misses the presentation, you know if they are successful at their job. You know whether you and your presenters met the objectives when you can clearly evaluate whether your audience enjoyed, learned and can use your presentation after it’s finished.

Presentation evaluations are important for many reasons. Not only do they find out if the audience enjoyed the presentation and liked the presenter, but most important, if done right, they can help you determine how effective the presentation was.

For example, a presentation evaluation survey can help you determine whether the presentation was effectively taught by discovering such things as whether the concepts of the presentation were well organized or how well the presenter knows the subject matter. Evaluation surveys can also tell you whether the presenter communicated clearly and was easy to understand.

Evaluation surveys can also tell you how effectively the presentation was managed. You can determine whether the presenter’s pace was just right, too fast, or too slow. You can also find out if the presenter controlled the audience and kept appropriate focus, or whether the presentation was enjoyable and kept the interest of the audience. You can even find out whether personal attention and extra help were available.

Who is the target audience?
  • Trainers
  • Teaching professionals
  • Entrepreneurs
  • Sales professionals
  • Managers
  • Human resources professionals
  • Team leads
  • Project managers
Compare to Other Presentation Skills Courses
Curriculum For This Course
5 Lectures
01:02:02
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Introduction
1 Lecture 05:27

If you’re able to take the presentation you’ve designed and built and find out if audience learned what they needed to learn, then no matter who walks out or misses the presentation, you know if they are successful at their job. You know whether you and your presenters met the objectives when you can clearly evaluate whether your audience enjoyed, learned and can use your presentation after it’s finished.

Presentation evaluations are important for many reasons. Not only do they find out if the audience enjoyed the presentation and liked the presenter, but most important, if done right, they can help you determine how effective the presentation was

Preview 05:27
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Create Your Evaluation Survey
3 Lectures 40:05

In general, it’s a really good idea to ask questions in an evaluation survey that allow you to get data points that can be analyzed. You will see in parts 2 and 3 of designing an evaluation survey that all of the questions in those areas allow for this data analysis. Even still, people are human, and asking free-text questions can also be powerful for you to find out what people “really think” about the presentation.  There are 3 key components to an effectively designed presentation evaluation survey.

Preview 17:52

Once you have designed your presentation evaluation survey, it’s time to actually create and produce it. We'll show you an example of a highly effective evaluation survey that incorporates each of the “ratings questions” and the “recommendation question” we have already discussed in the previous lecture.

Produce Your Evaluation Survey
08:54

Many presenters and instructional designers have spent sleepless nights after reading their presentation evaluation surveys. This is a sad and misunderstood fact. Presentation evaluations are meant to spur presenter growth and give presenters something to feel good about, not the other way around.

To ensure all of the presenters on your presentation team interpret the feedback on these presentation evaluation surveys the right way, there are some key steps to help them through the process.

Interpret Your Evaluation Survey
13:19
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Give the Right Benchmarks
1 Lecture 16:30

A benchmark check is a way to determine if audience understand a very difficult concept that requires leading and synthesis in order for them to fully grasp it. While leading questions help them understand, benchmarks find out if they do.

A benchmark also can help you determine who in the presentation does not understand. This is a way to hold each individual audience member accountable for an answer. Ultimately, the purpose of a benchmark is to identify who to tutor. You can use a benchmark checks anytime you’d intuitively ask, “Does that make sense?” This includes concepts that are important and hard to understand (concepts that require synthesis).

Bonus: Give the Right Benchmarks
16:30
About the Instructor
Jason Teteak
4.7 Average rating
989 Reviews
10,548 Students
52 Courses
Author, Keynote & TEDx Speaker, CEO Rule the Room

Jason Teteak knows what it takes to Rule the Room. The master trainer and speaking presentation teacher has taught more than 50,000 people how to flawlessly command attention.

He’s won praise and a wide following for his original methods, his engaging style, and his knack for transferring communications skills via practical, simple, universal, and immediately actionable techniques.

Jason first made a reputation in the medical training industry, where he was known as “the presentation coach and trainer who trains the trainers.” Teteak’s attention to detail and precision in communicating definitive information was honed in serving this lifesaving industry.

In response to many requests, he began to offer personalized services and quickly developed a following as a private coach and a consultant whose clientele includes elite institutions, universities, and top corporate executives.

His new book, Rule the Room, was recently published in the summer of 2013. He has developed more than fifty presentation and communication training programs ranging in length from one hour to three days that serve as the basis for this unique, practical, and comprehensive course.