Superpower English: Top ESL Teacher Tips for Novice Trainers

Grammar Refresher, Expert Teacher Tips and Free Resources for New ESL/EFL Trainers.
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  • Lectures 35
  • Contents Video: 1.5 hours
    Other: 41 mins
  • Skill Level Beginner Level
  • Languages English
  • Includes Lifetime access
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    Available on iOS and Android
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About This Course

Published 12/2014 English

Course Description

Are you new to ESL teaching ?

Want to get better at explaining the ins and outs of English?

Want quality lesson plans, audio and downloadables - all in one place?

Then this course is for you.

Designed for for new ESL trainers, it capitalises on my many years' experience as a language trainer, distilling knowledge I wish I'd had in the early days of my teaching career.

Practical tips and resources? This course has got it.

Foundation skills? This course covers it. And the course constantly grows with you.

With a better understanding of what English grammar is and how we can effectively teach it, we help our students express themselves accurately and effectively.

The purpose of this course is to present English grammar in a lyrical, easy-to understand way through the power of story-telling coupled with explanations, tables, exercises and images. It can be taken sequentially or in bite-sized-pieces depending on need.

Material will be regularly added, and feedback is actively sought. So please consider this your ongoing reference for continual learning and improvement.

Be the best ESL trainer you can be!

What are the requirements?

  • If English is your native language, you should have an understanding of terms such as noun, adjective, verb etc... though if these are known but unclear don't worry - we'll cover them in an early Lecture!

What am I going to get from this course?

  • understand the English language "genome", the "mathematics" of English or as I call it - the skeleton, flesh and blood! And have a great, interactive, innovative time getting to this point!
  • use your superpower English to plan better lessons, teach more effectively, be better able to identify and explain errors, and choose appropriate assessment tasks for your ESL students!
  • teach the core English skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing with confidence and ease!

What is the target audience?

  • This "Superpower Your English - Trainers" is designed for ESL instructors (qualified or currently undertaking an accredited qualification) who are looking for an overview which can easily be translated into the learning environment. It is designed to be interactive, innovative, educative and above all - enjoyable. For each step there are multiple resources for you to download, refer to, and use.
  • This course is probably not appropriate if you're an experienced ESL trainer comfortable with all aspects of teaching English grammar. Unless you want to refresh and get a different perspective!

What you get with this course?

Not for you? No problem.
30 day money back guarantee.

Forever yours.
Lifetime access.

Learn on the go.
Desktop, iOS and Android.

Get rewarded.
Certificate of completion.

Curriculum

Section 1: Welcome, Wilkommen, Bienvenue!
Pre-Course Quiz
6 questions
Article

Why are we ESL trainers important - and increasingly so? This lecture examines that question and sets us up for the lessons to come. As adult learners we need to know WHY we're learning - that's what this lecture answers.

03:24

Summary: The purpose of this course is to present English grammar in a lyrical, easy-to understand way through the power of story-telling coupled with explanations, tables, exercises and images. It can be taken sequentially or in bit-sized-pieces depending on need.

APPLICABLE TO ALL MATERIAL IN THIS COURSE:

You may use the recordings, associated transcripts and teaching material in your lessons, but you must credit me. In other words:

© Copyright. Jacqueline Seidel. 2015. May be used for educational purposes without written permission but with a citation to this source.


Full Transcript of this lecture

Imagine a language as a body, living and breathing, moving through space and time, growing and expanding, developing through experience and contact with other language bodies, with technology, with innovation. Language Body rarely sits still.

And now imagine the skeleton of this Language Body… the skeleton, holding everything in place, is Grammar. Language Body evolves, as do we all, and over time the skeleton shifts and bends and twists and turns but the core structure remains the same, identifiable. Simply put, a body needs a skeleton as a language needs grammar. But what are all those bones and joints and how do they fit together? That’s what we are going to examine here.

Grammar can be as dry and dusty as an unaired room, bogged down in detail and terminology and the weight of expectation from linguistic experts. But not with me. My grammar comes to life through the richness of the language which gives it movement, colour, shape, vitality.

With a better understanding of our own language’s grammar we can express ourselves beautifully, accurately, effectively and this can have wide-ranging positive effects on our employment prospects, promotion chances, and self-confidence.

Where English is a second language, understanding grammar can be a near-insurmountable hurdle, difficult to grasp and to use. That’s where I come in.

The purpose of this course is to present English grammar in a lyrical, easy-to understand way through the power of story-telling coupled with explanations, tables, exercises and images. It can be taken sequentially or in bit-sized-pieces depending on need.

This course is for native speakers of English wishing to improve their understanding of our Language Body, particularly for ESL instructors looking for an overview which can easily be translated to the classroom.

Material will be regularly added, and feedback is actively sought. So please consider this your ongoing reference for continual learning and improvement.

03:16

The purpose of this lecture is to give you background to my experience and to what fascinates me about English... it could be what fascinates you, too! By the end of this lecture you'll know some more about me, your trainer, and have a better feel of how the course will proceed, what to expect and what my teaching style is like. Very happy to receive feedback, for example: what do YOU love about English? Time to start using that Discussion Board :-)

Transcript of the video lecture:

I've been a langue trainer for many years, have had hundreds of groups, thousands of learners, I've taught all levels and abilities, learners with and without learning difficulties, learners with motivation and without, on site, online, in classrooms, production halls, meeting rooms, conference rooms, offices, while flying at 30,000 ft, about flying at 30,000 ft... you name it, I've probably taught it.

There have been training successes and training fails, the same ups and downs that come with any profession. I don not subscribe to the adage: "Those that can, do. Those who can't teach". Rather the opposite: those who can, can teach. Those who love what they do, have a passion and can instil that passion in others.... why, they become great teachers or trainers.

I'm a third generation teacher, my grandfather starting in the 1920s in country Victoria, teaching all years in old school houses. My mother is a retired primary school teacher, who taught in many countries around the world, as well as being school principal (of one of my schools!) and an advocate for increased literary training for all children across all socio-economic groups.

As such I've always been fascinated by the make-up of the English language, the various and beautiful ways it can be twisted and turned, the subtle nuances between words, the ways in which word order can substantially change meaning, of how our intonation can make all the difference.

I love how the rhythm of speech can engage our emotions (think of the great orators: Ancient Greece's Pericles, Ireland's Daniel O'Connell [The Liberator], America's Martin Luther King Jr, John F. Kennedy and Barack Obama; South Africa's Nelson Mandela, England's Winston Churchill and most recently Australia's Noel Pearson.

So why take this course with me? Because I truly love the language, I love teaching it and finding new and exciting ways to introduce new language, grammar and concepts to learning, giving them "Eureka!" moments as quickly and effectively as possible.

As a language trainer, I hope that you also have this enthusiasm, and I look forward to working with you on this course!

04:35

Purpose: by the end of this lecture you'll know how the course is structured, what questions we'll be answering and what kind of extra (supplementary, downloadable) material is available. And watch out - there are activities for you to undertake along the way!

Transcript of Lecture:

In my early days as a language trainer I tried to draw a picture of English grammar on a whiteboard, starting with a straight line running horizontal across the board, intersected here and there with perpendicular lines representing time. It was simplistic but served to get an initial message across - that English was similarly built to German (my students were German).

In the downloadable section of this lecture you'll find an approximation of the picture I drew that day and not surprisingly.... goodness gracious it is dull. But a quick Google search will show you that grammar (and sentence structure) is most often represented as a line. Beginning, middle, end. And that is how we’re going to approach it in this course, for the sake of simplicity - by that I mean simplicity of the construction of the language.

Our lessons will follow this path:

Present

  • We need to start somewhere, so how about the here and now?
  • Facts, routine, who does what, when, where and how (often)
  • What is happening at the moment?
  • We delve into the grammar through the life of Robert Smith and his family, his adventures and misadventures.

Past

  • We take a step back in time…
  • What did you do yesterday? Last week? On your last birthday?
  • What were you doing yesterday at 3:00PM?
  • We compare these with the Present Perfect (Have you ever been to Berlin?), and explore this grammar through the Mr & Mrs Smith.

Future

  • What will the world be like in 20 years? 100 years? Will the oceans swallow coastal towns? Will coal power be a thing of the past, the stuff of nightmares?
  • What are you going to do tomorrow, next week? Where are you going for your next holidays?
  • Plans, arrangements, predictions… we look into the future through the eyes of the young Mr Smith.

At every step along the way we will be forming sentences, questions, positive and negative answers. Every lecture comes with explanations, stories, pictures, exercises, activities and a simple question: what more can I do for you?

Let’s start building our skeleton.

Section 2: Rattling Bones... The English Language Skeleton
04:19

Purpose: this lecture breaks down the elements of English, and sets us up for learning. We touch on adult learning principles (which can be examined in more detail by request - please leave me a note in the Discussion Board). By the end of this lecture we will have refreshed the elements of English, namely the grammar terms, and have them forefront in our minds for the upcoming, detailed lectures.

Transcript of Lecture:

I've been asked by many a newly-qualified ESL trainer: "What on earth is the Present Perfect? Present Simple? Past Continuous???? How can I learn all these terms, Jacqui? I feel stupid sometimes because English is my native language, so why isn't it easy to teach it?"

It's a good question, right? And it's one that I also struggled with as a new trainer. If I can speak the language, why can't I teach it? Because many of us weren't taught the basics of our language in school. And for those of us who never learned a second language, we don't have that sense for the building blocks. Communicating comes automatically ("unconscious competence" to use a term from Noel Burch's Four Stages of Learning, which I encourage you to read up on. Please see the Supplementary Material section for this lecture).

It took me about a year to feel comfortable teaching English, to have a sense of ease with the ins and outs, exceptions to rules and the wibbly-wobbly bumpy bits and pieces. So let's take a look at the structure of our skeleton, and all the fabulous wibbly-wobbly components it has to offer.

Diving right in (and expanding on the information in the previous lecture), we have...

Present

  • Present Simple: used for facts, routine, who does what, when, where and how (often) and states
  • Present Continuous: what is happening at the moment?
  • Questions, Answers, Positives, Negatives, Signal Words (auxiliary verbs / adverbs of frequency)
  • Comparisons between the forms + exercises, supplementary material and quizzes!

Perfect

  • Present Perfect: what have you done?
  • Present Perfect Continuous: what have you been doing?
  • Questions, Answers, Positives, Negatives, Signal Words, Common Mistakes
  • Comparisons between the forms + exercises, supplementary material and quizzes!

Past

  • Past Simple: used for finished time, finished actions and results.
  • Past Continuous: used for actions which took place in the past, over a period of time.
  • Comparison with Present Perfect (see above).
  • Questions, Answers, Positives, Negatives, Signal Words
  • Further comparisons between the forms + exercises, supplementary material and quizzes!

Future

  • Plans, arrangements, predictions, schedules
  • "Will" future (what do you think the world will be like in 20 years?)
  • "going to" future (what are you going to do?)
  • future continuous (what are you going to do on the weekend?)
  • future perfect (what will you have done by the end of the week?)
  • Questions, Answers, Positives, Negatives, Signal Words
  • Comparisons between the forms + exercises, supplementary material and quizzes!

As mentioned previously:

at every step along the way we will be forming sentences, questions, positive and negative answers;

every lecture comes with explanations, stories, pictures, exercises, activities and a simple question: what more can I do for you?

And one more point: vocabulary will be included in every lecture, and these will also be presented in word lists or word maps.

It is also planned that every lecture will have a business application of the language, so the resources can also be used in business English training programs. These are currently in progress.

So, to recap: In this lecture we have refreshed the elements of English, namely the grammar terms.

Put simply, by the end of this lecture you should have a colourful overview of the English Language, what is going to be covered in this course, and how it is broken up (and why).

Let's begin!

05:41

We need to increase our own vocabulary before we can confidently teach English, and part of this is refreshing the basics such as - what is an adjective? an adverb? how can I quickly identify it?

Now, we may have learned this in Primary School but if you're like me, that was last century! And many of us never had these English basics in school. So this lecture will refresh your own vocabulary and set you up for success in the ESL classroom.

Adjectives and Adverbs Quiz!
2 questions
Section 3: Being Practical
06:35

Classroom layout can have a significant impact on the effectiveness of your ESL lesson - can you see your students? Can they see you and one another? Are there sufficient opportunities for group work, pair activities, group discussions, "role plays"? Can all students see the board / flip chart / screen? Different classroom layouts promote different kinds of learning, so in this lecture we examine the most common types and their advantages and disadvantages.

By the end of this lecture you will have had an overview of different layout options, reflected on your training style and students' learning purpose and be better equipped to critically evaluate your training environment and the effectiveness of your training in relation to room layout.

Section 4: Present
02:08

This is an audio recording of my sister, Vivienne O'Connell, reading our introduction to the sounds of Present Simple. As with each item of grammar in this course I wrote the text specifically for the Udemy platform, and it forms the basis of exercises which you will find attached to upcoming lectures.

It's aim is to focus your thoughts on this foundation piece of grammar, and is our first step into making you as familiar with it as you are with... well... with something you're very familiar with!

I encourage you to listen and read the associated transcript, which is available as a downloadable resource.

You may use this recording and the transcript in your lessons, but you must credit me. In other words:

© Copyright. Jacqueline Seidel. 2015. May be used for educational purposes without written permission but with a citation to this source.

05:17

In this lecture we encounter our foundation stone (or "bone", to continue the Language Skeleton analogy), without which we cannot continue. The Present Simple. We discuss it's purpose, use and signal words. By the end of this lecture you'll be conversant in the basics, which we need in order to continue and add more "bones" to our skeleton.

You may use this material in your lessons, but you must credit me. In other words:

© Copyright. Jacqueline Seidel. 2015. May be used for educational purposes without written permission but with a citation to this source.

04:48

In order to more effectively train your ESL students, and to be prepared for any curly questions which may come your way, you've got to know each element of the English Language Skeleton like the back of your hand.

This lecture delves into signal words - the auxiliary verb "do", adverbs of frequency and how we build sentences.

By the end of this lecture you'll be adept at identifying Present Simple, which complements previously-learned knowledge of why we need the Present Simple.

To refresh: for facts, routines, timetables.

Following these knowledge-based lectures we look at practical implementation.

02:29

Catering for all learning types (for more information please see the attachment on VARK - also useful in your lesson planning and delivery), this lecture is a musical interlude on positive and negative structures, designed not only for Visual / Auditory learners, but also as a resource in your lessons: all the examples provided in the video are available as downloads for your lessons.

05:33

How do we build questions and answers in the Present Simple, and what signal words do we use... and in what order? This is our final piece of the Present Simple puzzle, from which we begin to plan how we can introduce this to our ESL students.

Article

Every trainer keeps a Toolbox of handy hints and tips which only grow over time - advice from other trainers, useful websites, handy resources and so on. I'm no different and after so many years as an ESL trainer my toolbox is overflowing (despite discarding resources I created early on in my career - cringeworthy now!)

This lecture contains information to add to your personal ESL Trainer Toolbox on teaching the Present Simple. As with all lectures in this course it's designed to ensure you're Classroom Ready.

You may use this material in your lessons, but you must credit me. In other words:

© Copyright. Jacqueline Seidel. 2015. May be used for educational purposes without written permission but with a citation to this source.

Present Simple Quiz
3 questions
02:23

This audio recording is our introduction to the sounds of Present continuous. It's aim is to focus your thoughts on this beautiful, "-ing" piece of grammar, and is our first step into making you as familiar with it as you are with... well... with something you're very familiar with!

I encourage you to listen and read the associated transcript, which is available as a downloadable resource.

You may use this material in your lessons, but you must credit me. In other words:

© Copyright. Jacqueline Seidel. 2015. May be used for educational purposes without written permission but with a citation to this source.

06:55

We need to understand the ins and outs of the Present Continuous so we're classroom ready, particularly for our ESL students for whom this type of grammar is completely new. So this lecture breaks it down, and starts to give us the language and tools we can use on our classroom.

Article

This lecture is text-based and focuses on:

  1. the structure of Present Continuous' questions and negatives,
  2. a comparison with Present Simple,
  3. frequently asked questions (by students, collected over so many years of teaching)

Without having these basics firmly in our mind, we won't be prepared for our students' questions or problems, and our lessons will be in danger of becoming muddled or difficult for students to follow.

So by the end of this lesson, you'll not only be a professional in Present Continuous, but also in being able to explain and demonstrate it to your students.

Article

Time to update your Toolbox of handy hints and tips!

This lecture contains information to add to your personal ESL Trainer Toolbox on teaching the Present Continuous. As with all lectures in this course it's designed to ensure you're Classroom Ready.

You may use this material in your lessons, but you must credit me. In other words:

© Copyright. Jacqueline Seidel. 2015. May be used for educational purposes without written permission but with a citation to this source.

Article

Listening and reading are all well and good, but you're the ESL teachers and you've got to activate your skills... which is where this lecture some into it.

In this lecture I give you an example of material I used in my early teaching days (an exercise for a group of beginner students) - I'd like you to create similar material for two specific groups.

By the end of this lecture you'll not only have my material to add to your Toolbox, you'll also have had hands-on practice at preparing beginner-level material.

NOTE: Don't forget that while you can use this or any material provided in this course, I encourage you to personalise material where practical. Further, where using specific vocabulary I encourage pre-teaching the vocabulary prior to introducing the exercises. In supporting your students you're giving them the ability to be successful which flows into their motivation.

You may use this material in your lessons, but you must credit me. In other words:

© Copyright. Jacqueline Seidel. 2015. May be used for educational purposes without written permission but with a citation to this source.

Present Simple or Continuous??
2 questions
Section 5: Perfect
01:57

This audio recording is our introduction to the sounds of Present Perfect. It's aim is to focus your thoughts on this "perfect" piece of grammar, and is our first step into making you as familiar with it as you are with... well... with something you're very familiar with!

I encourage you to listen and read the associated transcript, which is available as a downloadable resource.

You may use this material in your lessons, but you must credit me. In other words:

© Copyright. Jacqueline Seidel. 2015. May be used for educational purposes without written permission but with a citation to this source.

07:35

In my many years of training I've found this particular tense to cause the most problems, because there are a few things at play:

  • students need to learn so many irregular verbs, plus the different pronunciation of regular verbs (with an -ed ending)
  • this tense may or may not exist in your students' L1
  • where this tense does exist in your students' L1, it may be used in a different way or have a different meaning.

It can be difficult to explain, demonstrate or teach this tense and so this section aims to make you familiar with the look and feel of the Present Perfect, and demonstrate effective ways in which it can be introduced and taught to your ESL students.

Article

Every trainer keeps a Toolbox of handy hints and tips which only grow over time - advice from other trainers, useful websites, handy resources and so on. I'm no different and after so many years as an ESL trainer my toolbox is overflowing (despite discarding resources I created early on in my career - cringeworthy now!)

This lecture contains information to add to your personal ESL Trainer Toolbox on teaching the Present Perfect. As with all lectures in this course it's designed to ensure you're Classroom Ready.

You may use this material in your lessons, but you must credit me. In other words:

© Copyright. Jacqueline Seidel. 2015. May be used for educational purposes without written permission but with a citation to this source.

Section 6: Past
02:10

This audio recording is our introduction to the sounds of Past Simple. It's aim is to focus your thoughts on this foundation piece of the past, and is our first step into making you as familiar with it as you are with... well... with something you're very familiar with!

I encourage you to listen and read the associated transcript, which is available as a downloadable resource.

You may use this material in your lessons, but you must credit me. In other words:

© Copyright. Jacqueline Seidel. 2015. May be used for educational purposes without written permission but with a citation to this source.

04:25

Before I write anything else, I'd like to flag that this lecture contains photos of my great-grandparents, including a wedding photo taken in around 1910 (my Grandpa was born in 1911). My Udemy students only get the best!

Now, down to the details of this lecture... we encounter the Past Simple tense, look at its components and also signal words. As humans we're naturally pulled to conversations about things which happened in the past, and our ESL students will need this quite early on in their training. As an ESL teacher you need to be absolutely conversant with the ins and outs of this tense, and that's what this lecture sets you up for.

This lecture also contains downloadable material for your Teacher Toolbox.

You may use this material in your lessons, but you must credit me. In other words:

© Copyright. Jacqueline Seidel. 2015. May be used for educational purposes without written permission but with a citation to this source.

04:13

In this lecture we hone in on signal words and auxiliary, compare the structure and usage to Present Simple, and provide ample examples of how this tense is formed, how to identify it. This is a natural progression from the previous lectures and leads nicely into Past Continuous.

Building our English Grammar Skeleton is a step-by-step process, so by the end of this lecture you will be more than halfway through the construction of this skeleton. You'll be confident at identifying this tense and ready to start learning teaching techniques.

10 pages

There are three distinct ways of pronouncing Past Simple regular verbs, and this lecture identifies those three ways as well as the "signal sounds" we can show our students to help them more easily learn the correct pronunciation.

I've found it most effective - in the first instance at least - to be soft on the difference between "t" and "d" endings, concentrating rather on "id" pronunciation endings. If we consider the difference between impeding and non-impeding errors (not in relation to sentence construction or grammar but rather in relation to pronunciation) then I think you'll agree this is a good starting point. After all, a student who says "I live-ed in Berlin" will get more of a giggle (and possible negative marking in an English examination) than one who says - with a hard "t" sound - "I lived(t) in Berlin".

So, by the end of this lecture you'll have the tools you need to see and show the difference in pronunciation for regular verbs.

Article

In this lecture we not only cover why we need the Past Simple, but you have the opportunity to get stuck into some hands-on work creating your own material according to a wee scenario I've included in the lecture.

So, by the end of this lecture you'll have produced some more material for your Teacher's Toolbox, which you'll be immediately able to use!

You may use this material (that given here in the lecture) in your lessons, but you must credit me. In other words:

© Copyright. Jacqueline Seidel. 2015. May be used for educational purposes without written permission but with a citation to this source.

03:21

I was thinking, while I was planning this lecture, how to describe the importance of the Past Continuous when an idea came to mind... don't tell, demonstrate! And so I did, in that first sentence.

Just as the Present Continuous can be difficult for our learners, so can the Past Continuous. And sometimes for us also! If we've never actively thought about how we use this little gem, how can we confidently and effectively describe it to our ESL learners?

This lecture seeks to solve this quandary, and it's supported by examples and sets us up for the complementary following lecture.

03:53

We can't simple look at Past Continuous in a bubble - it would be like trying to stand on one leg without the support of your foot, ankle or tibia. So in this lecture we examine the differences between the Past Simple and Past Continuous - what are the differences in meaning? Do we need both tenses?

Why, of course we do!

So by the end of this lecture you'll have compared the two tenses and be familiar with the differences. Further, the downloadable section of this lecture will give you idea of how to use this tense in your classroom and activities you can adapt to suit different learner types.

Article

Yes, we're adding more tidbits of information into your Teacher Toolbox. In this lecture we look at what we need to be teaching our ESL students in terms of the past tense, and one specific sample lesson plan of how to introduce one element.

By the end of this lecture you'll have another string in your bow, another element for your toolbox, and have a foundation lesson for teaching Past Simple, - Pronunciation of Regular Verbs.

You may use this material in your lessons, but you must credit me. In other words:

© Copyright. Jacqueline Seidel. 2015. May be used for educational purposes without written permission but with a citation to this source.

Section 7: Future
07:11

Together we've identified present, past and perfect tenses, filled out Teacher Toolbox, and progressively built our English Language Skeleton... but something's missing. Without the future, our skeleton isn't complete. And that's what we look at in this lecture.

Being able to talk about future plans and arrangements is part of our daily dialogue, and our students need this ability. Before we teach them, though, we need to be clear ourselves not only on what the forms are, but how they look, how they're used and from there - how can we teach them.

In this lecture we examine three main future forms: will, going to and present continuous. By the end of this lecture you'll have an understanding not only of these three forms but also potential problems your students may face. Forewarned is forearmed, as they say.

1 page

This Teacher's Toolbox comes in the shape of a PDF document, which covers not only ideas on how to teach future forms to your students but also provides you with a sample lesson plan.

So by the end of this lecture you've got a lesson plan at your fingertips which you can adapt and expand according to the needs of your students. Go forth and teach!

You may use this material in your lessons, but you must credit me. In other words:

© Copyright. Jacqueline Seidel. 2015. May be used for educational purposes without written permission but with a citation to this source.

Article

Once again, this is a lecture which gives us the opportunity to actively apply the knowledge we've covered thus far. The benefit of this lecture is you'll have more material for your Teacher Toolbox, which you can take directly to your students.

Enjoy!

Article

The fabulous complexities of our English Language Skeleton really come to light in this text-based lecture, which examines two future forms: Future Perfect Simple and Future Perfect Continuous, and then goes on to demonstrate how we can slowly yet surely introduce them to our students. You'll be professionals at understanding and explaining the future tenses at the end of this lecture!

Section 8: Conclusion
03:24

It's time now to take a look back at the topics we've covered so far, and refresh what we've learned. As is good practice, at the end of a lesson we reflect and refresh.

By the end of this lecture that's exactly what we will have done, and you'll be all set for the end of course Quiz!

End of Course Super-Quiz!
9 questions
Article

This is the final lecture in our course, and one in which I have the opportunity to thank you for your participation. I certainly hoped the course met your expectations and I welcome your feedback. Remember, through Udemy you have lifetime access to this course, and I intend that it grows and develops with your input.

Thank you for your participation, and I look forward to hearing from you!

Jacqui.

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Instructor Biography

We've been providing customised training solutions to SMEs and multinationals since 2006, and our reputation as effective, engaging trainers continues to grow.

"We have used Jacqui on several occasions for the language training and education of our employees and we will also involve her in the future. Jacqui offers a very pleasant teaching style and through this, our employees quickly achieved their learning goals." -- T. Pietzsch, Geschäftsführer, GETT Gerätetechnik GmbH

O'Connell Advanced Training Solutions is your partner for capacity strengthening  training programs.

Offline, we provide advanced coaching and development in effective Business English communication for small and medium enterprises in Germany, delivered through competency-based, customised, individual or small group training programs.

Online, we broaden our training offers to include specific offers for managers, human resource professionals and corporate trainers.

Both online and offline, we provide personalised, business-relevant solutions which are high-touch, confidential, flexible and friendly.

- Jacqueline Seidel, Managing Director

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