Effective Tools for Facilitating Classroom Activities
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Effective Tools for Facilitating Classroom Activities

Master the strategies, techniques, and tools you need to facilitate classroom activities
0.0 (0 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
9 students enrolled
Created by Jason Teteak
Last updated 3/2017
English
Curiosity Sale
Current price: $10 Original price: $200 Discount: 95% off
30-Day Money-Back Guarantee
Includes:
  • 4.5 hours on-demand video
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Get Buy-in for the Activity
  • Build Pre-activity Credibility and Rapport
  • Build Prerequisite Credibility
  • Hook the Trainees on the Activity
  • Build Activity Credibility and Rapport
  • Build Credibility and Rapport during the Activity
  • Build Credibility and Rapport after the Activity
  • Find Trainees Who Need Help
  • Check If Trainees Are Following Along
  • Work the Room
  • Check If Trainees Understand Key Concepts
  • Give Benchmark Checks
  • Check If Trainees Can Do Critical Tasks
  • Administer Independent Assessments
  • Check If Trainees Remember Key Take-Aways
  • Administer Independent Assessments
  • Check If Trainees Remember Key Take-Aways
  • Provide Post-activity Oral Reviews
  • Tutor Effectively during Activities
  • Get in the Tutoring Door
  • Teach to Their Learning Style
  • Perform a Cold Read
  • Tutor with Teaching Tools
  • Answer a Trainee’s Question during an Activity
  • Master Tutoring Non-verbals
  • Master Your Tutoring Body Language
  • Master Your Tutoring Facial Expressions
  • Master Your Tutoring Tone of Voice
  • Manage the Activity Pace
  • Handle Fast Learners
  • Manage One Fast Learner at a Time
  • Manage Multiple Fast Learners at Once
  • Handle Slow Learners
  • Manage One Slow Learner at a Time
  • Manage Multiple Slow Learners at Once
  • Manage Activity Time
  • Manage Activities Where You Run out of Time
  • Manage Later Arrivers
  • Prepare to Lead an Activity
  • Prepare a Pre-activity Checklist
  • Critical Things to Do Prior to an Activity
  • Use a Checklist during the Activity
  • Critical Things to Do during an Activity
  • Apply a Post-activity Checklist
  • Critical Things to Do after an Activity
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • Make sure to download the workbook to help you follow along with this course.
Description

This program dives deeply into the strategies, techniques, and tools you need to facilitate classroom activities. Activity will teach you how to create and deliver activities capable of actually changing people’s behavior. You’ll learn double the techniques of most train-the-trainer programs, with hundreds of immediately actionable techniques that cover all the essential areas, from getting buy-in to finding students who need help. We also address tutoring effectively, managing pace, preparing well, and discovering new activities.

There are times in a classroom when you just can’t keep lecturing. Your audience members can only focus on your lecture for so long before their minds start to drift. To maximize learning and keep their focus, you need to change gears and add activities that keep participants engaged. This four-hour program focuses on how to facilitate those activities so your participants can enjoy themselves and still learn exactly what they need to know. 

Who is the target audience?
  • Trainers
  • Teachers
  • Professors
  • Team Leads
  • Instructors
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Curriculum For This Course
23 Lectures
04:40:00
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Introduction and Welcome
1 Lecture 15:26

There are times in a classroom when you just can’t keep lecturing. Your audience members can only focus on your lecture for so long before their minds start to drift. To maximize learning and keep their focus, you need to change gears and add activities that keep participants engaged. This four-hour program focuses on how to facilitate those activities so your participants can enjoy themselves and still learn exactly what they need to know. 

Preview 15:26
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Get Buy-In for the Activity
5 Lectures 01:13:28

If you have a hard time getting all your trainees to work on activities, I bet I know what your problem is. And—though all these things matter—it’s not because of how well your activity is written or where you’re standing or that your activity is too long or too short. It’s not because of anything you are doing. It’s what you are not doing.

You haven’t kept your focus. You’ve forgotten that the activity isn’t about you; it’s about your trainees. When you’re introducing the activity for the first time, when you’re making that first impression, how you’re feeling and what you’re doing doesn’t matter as much as how they’re doing and how they’re feeling. You should be concentrating on their feelings and their needs.

Preview 14:09

Credibility isn’t enough; trainees also need to feel comfortable around you. Establishing rapport will enable them to ask you questions and accept help when they need it. It’s almost more important to build rapport during a non-lecture lesson because not only do you have to get them to accept you and your teaching style but also the activity. You must successfully build rapport with your class in order to get them to attempt an activity outside the norm.

To accomplish this, you need to learn how to be welcoming, meet trainee needs, show that you care, get trainees to like you, make class enjoyable for your trainees, and make them feel comfortable asking you for help.

Build Pre-Activity Rapport
19:23

The hook grabs the attention and interest of all trainees by addressing two fundamental components of adult learning.

Preview 15:18

Be sure to set up good expectations as well. Reassure your trainees that although they might not currently understand why they are performing a particular activity, it will all make sense in the end. If you’ve successfully built rapport, you can even ask them to “do this for you.” Remind them that you’re invested in them as their trainer and that you’re not going to abandon them as they perform the activity. 

Preview 16:05

Within the activity, you need to demonstrate your credibility and build rapport not only with the material (functionality and workflows), but also with the content and format of the activity. For any activity that you might choose, the way to accomplish this is to walk from person to person or group to group and ensure that things are going well. In part, this means that they understand the functionality and the industry knowledge. 

Preview 08:33
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Find Trainees Who Need Help
5 Lectures 54:44

During an activity, there are many students with questions. If you handle questions well during an activity, you meet your trainees’ needs, which earns you credibility and respect; you keep the trainees focused and engaged, and you look like a pro.

Check if Trainees are Following Along - Part 1
13:56

The best trainers are able to FIND those trainees who need help following along, even if they are hard to find and don’t ask questions. The trick is to masterfully work the room.

Check if Trainees are Following Along - Part 2
07:49

Here’s one of my favorites. So many trainers are afraid to go up and ask someone if he needs help. Many more are afraid to confront the trainee who blows off an activity entirely. Checkpoints will not only solve this problem, they will also help to ensure the trainees actually GET IT when they work on an activity without you up in front leading them. 

Check if Trainees Understand Key Concepts
19:23

An independent assessment is a great way to determine if trainees are able to do things on their own. What’s more, it can serve nicely as an “if you have time,” without taking a lot of time out of your prep schedule. It allows the fast trainees to not only have something to do, but it also encourages them get to stage four of learning (I can do this myself).

Check if Trainees can do Critical Tasks
06:57

At the end of each activity, you want to make sure the trainees remember key take-aways from the activity itself. The Step Learners will love you for this, and all the learners will benefit from this.

Check if Trainees Remember Key Takeaways
06:39
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Tutor Effectively During Activities
6 Lectures 01:22:04

One of the greatest challenges trainers have when facilitating an activity is getting a conversation opened up in the first place. How do you get in the door with trainees who don’t seem to want help? Recall there are three kinds of trainees who will ask questions in a classroom activity environment.

Get in the Tutoring Door
19:32

Did you know that when you help trainees during non-lecture activities, you are actually tutoring them? That has implications for how to teach them. You no longer have to focus so much on teaching four learners simultaneously. Wouldn’t it be more efficient if you just taught in the learning style(s) of the individual trainee you are tutoring, the one the trainee really wants to learn in? 

Teach to Their Learning Style - Part 1
10:06

Teaching tools can be a powerful means of tutoring trainees if you know when and how to use them in the right situation. In this lecture, we'll cover some of the key methods and strategies on how you might harness each of them during activities in your classroom.

Teach to Their Learning Style - Part 2
19:59

Answering a trainee’s question is very different when it’s one-on-one during an activity versus in front of the whole class. When it’s in front of the whole class, you only get three “get out of jail free” cards. In other words, if you say, “I don’t know,” more than three times in any given class, you start to lose your credibility. Trainees are much more forgiving one-on-one during an activity.

Teach to Their Learning Style - Part 3
08:57

As you begin to tutor a trainee during an activity, there are a few points to consider about your non-verbal signals, namely facial expressions, body language, and tone.

Master Tutoring Non-Verbals - Part 1
11:26

The pace of your voice can be used to subtly give importance to a subject while you are tutoring. Decrease your pace when you want to emphasize something or make a point. Increase your pace when relating trivial items used only for emphasizing a much larger point. 

Master Tutoring Non-Verbals - Part 2
12:04
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Manage the Activity Pace
3 Lectures 32:34

Fast learners will progress through your activities and training materials rather quickly. They are often technically experienced and may ask complex questions that are beyond the scope of your training. 

Handle Fast Learners
17:29

Slow learners are trainees who either ask a lot of questions or none at all. They often have a hard time keeping up with exercises but may not share this with you. Many are the quiet type of slow learners. A slow learner could be someone who really struggles to learn new things or someone with very little experience with an EMR or the tasks of the roles in class. 

Handle Slow Learners
05:49

If you find yourself short on time, one of two things happened during your training. Either the estimation on how long the activity would take was wrong or you let the class control the time and take more than was allotted.

If the estimate for the activity was just wrong and all of your trainees were still actively working on the basic tasks when time was up, one option is to just finish the topic and improvise your subsequent lessons to save time where possible. 

Manage Activity Time
09:16
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Prepare to Lead an Activity
3 Lectures 21:44

You’ve learned your course content, and you’ve taken this course. Now what? Remember, learning doesn’t truly happen until a behavior change occurs. How do you start to put into practice all that you’ve learned? How do you ensure your trainees get the benefit of everything you want them to get? It’s time for setting up your activity and dealing with all the logistics you have both for the activity and for yourself. 

Prepare a Pre-Activity Checklist
06:45

In this lecture we'll cover some concise steps to use as you facilitate an effective activity as a classroom trainer. Use this checklist as you walk around during your next activity.

Use a Checklist During the Activity
05:02

In this lecture, we'll cover some concise steps to use after you facilitate an effective activity as a classroom trainer. Use this checklist after your trainees have finished the activity.

Apply a Post Activity Checklist
09:57
About the Instructor
Jason Teteak
4.8 Average rating
894 Reviews
9,955 Students
35 Courses
Author, Keynote & TEDx Speaker, CEO Rule the Room

Jason Teteak knows what it takes to Rule the Room. The master trainer and speaking presentation teacher has taught more than 50,000 people how to flawlessly command attention.

He’s won praise and a wide following for his original methods, his engaging style, and his knack for transferring communications skills via practical, simple, universal, and immediately actionable techniques.

Jason first made a reputation in the medical training industry, where he was known as “the presentation coach and trainer who trains the trainers.” Teteak’s attention to detail and precision in communicating definitive information was honed in serving this lifesaving industry.

In response to many requests, he began to offer personalized services and quickly developed a following as a private coach and a consultant whose clientele includes elite institutions, universities, and top corporate executives.

His new book, Rule the Room, was recently published in the summer of 2013. He has developed more than fifty presentation and communication training programs ranging in length from one hour to three days that serve as the basis for this unique, practical, and comprehensive course.