Editing Workflow for Filmmakers
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Editing Workflow for Filmmakers

Edit Your Film From Scratch: The Do It Yourself Guide to Film Editing
5.0 (1 rating)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
12 students enrolled
Last updated 6/2017
English
Current price: $10 Original price: $200 Discount: 95% off
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30-Day Money-Back Guarantee
Includes:
  • 1.5 hours on-demand video
  • 1 Supplemental Resource
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Edit your own film from scratch. You'll learn an efficient workflow that will allow you to organize your projects, process tremendous amounts of footage cleanly, do an assembly edit, sound design, basic color correction, and exporting it for delivery for web, television, or film festivals.
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • This course is for filmmakers who already are comfortable editing with their editing software of choice.
Description

Hello.  Welcome to “Editing Workflow for Filmmakers”, the only course designed specifically for filmmakers editing their own film.  I’m so excited to present this information to you because I will be sharing my workflow for how to set up my editing projects, all the things that I do in a day from importing raw footage all the way to exporting a film for final delivery.

By the time you are finished this course you will be light years ahead of other editors who know how to use editing software, but feel overwhelmed and anxious while editing because they haven’t yet developed an efficient workflow for the post-production phase of their film.

You will learn how to start with an empty timeline and finish with a completed film that you are proud of.  

Over the years, my role has as an editor has evolved gradually.  There once was a time when an editor only cut the picture and someone else dealt with the sound.  But nowadays, that really isn’t the case.  

An editor has slowly become a one person band.

It is a new reality that has come about partly by the democratization of equipment, faster computers, laptops, smaller cameras, and other technological innovations that allow one person to do a lot more than they could do years ago.  This course addresses this new reality.

I will show you how to organize your footage, do an assembly edit, an offline edit,

sound design,

and export your film for television, web, or even theatrical release.

You will be seeing all of these things in real time from start to finish.

 

In order to get the most out of this course, I invite you to write down the steps that I outline in a checklist form.  During each stage of post-production, you can refer to these checklists in order to remember what to do next.  This will make things a whole lot easier and prevent you from feeling overwhelmed.

One final note:  this course is for filmmakers who already are comfortable editing with their editing software of choice.  It doesn’t matter if you prefer Final Cut Pro, Avid, or Adobe Premiere.  

 

This course runs on the principle that all of these pieces of software are merely tools.  Whichever software you prefer, feel free to use it.

The ideas presented in this course are designed to work for all of them.

 

So thank you for watching “Editing Workflow for Filmmakers” and I hope you enjoy it.

Who is the target audience?
  • This course is designed for passionate filmmakers who are well versed in the art of cinema. The examples in this course are edited using Adobe Creative Cloud, but if you are an Avid or Final Cut Pro editor, you can still follow along. However, whichever software you are using, make sure that you are experienced enough with that software to follow along comfortably.
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Curriculum For This Course
14 Lectures
01:31:40
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Overview and Introduction
1 Lecture 02:26

Welcome to “Editing Workflow for Filmmakers”.

By the time you are finished this course you will be light years ahead of other editors who know how to use editing software, but feel overwhelmed and anxious while editing because they haven’t yet developed an efficient workflow for the post-production phase of their film.You will learn how to start with an empty timeline and finish with a completed film that you are proud of. 

This course is for filmmakers who already are comfortable editing with their editing software of choice.  It doesn’t matter if you prefer Final Cut Pro, Avid, or Adobe Premiere.

This course runs on the principle that all of these pieces of software are merely tools. Whichever software you prefer, feel free to use it. The ideas presented in this course are designed to work for all of them





 



Preview 02:26
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Stay Organized
2 Lectures 12:11

In this chapter, let's take the opportunity to address what I believe is the most important factor in ensuring that you are able to be as creative as possible during the post-production phase of your film: maintaining a clean and well organized folder structure:  Here's why I think it is so important.  Even if you have to spend only 10 extra seconds searching for a missing file that you need, or locating an earlier draft of a project file, for example, that's ten seconds that you are not focusing on the creative aspects of your film.  Working as cleanly as possible is going to benefit you immensely.  I recommend inventing your own organizing system that works best for you and how your mind works.  But just as a brief warm up, I invite you to emulate the folder structure that I am currently using and then you can use it as a template to create your own.  Here it is.

Organize Your Folder Structure
04:42

The most daunting task that I experience as an editor isn’t actually editing the film, it is the task of managing the massive amounts of footage that I have to ingest BEFORE I even start editing.  Sometimes, when I look at all of those folders of raw footage, I don’t even know where to begin. I don’t know your situation, but I have rarely worked on a project where I was afforded the luxury of an assistant editor and if you are like me, you’ll have to come up with your own system for managing footage.  So, like I always say: use the system that works best for  how your mind works, but in the meantime, just copy the system that I am about to show  you.
Organize Your Footage
07:29
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The Offline Edit
6 Lectures 38:39

So, the next step after you organize all of your footage is to do what I call "Trim the fat".  The reason why this is so important is because it helps you get a lay of the land.  How many takes do I have?  What am I working with?  So you just go through the footage, omit the slates, and label the footage a different color depending on what the take represents.  Then you go into your checklist and make notes about what the scene involves, color coding the checklist to keep track of where you are in the process. Then you move on to the next scene, we color code it blue to mean we are starting, we make a quick note about what the scene involves and then we continue.  So here we are trimming anything that we deem to be unnecessary. The whole purpose of this process is to get rid of anything that will slow us down and thus hinder the creativity when it comes down to actually editing the story.


 

Trim the Fat
03:01

The most daunting task that I experience as an editor isn’t actually editing the film, it is the task of managing the massive amounts of footage that I have to ingest BEFORE I even start editing.  Sometimes, when I look at all of those folders of raw footage, I don’t even know where to begin. I don’t know your situation, but I have rarely worked on a project where I was afforded the luxury of an assistant editor and if you are like me, you’ll have to come up with your own system for managing footage.  So, like I always say: use the system that works best for  how your mind works, but in the meantime, just copy the system that I am about to show  you.
Find the best takes, moments, and performances
14:48

In an earlier chapter, I attempted to make the case for abandoning the old school method of opening each clip one at a time, setting in and out points, etc.    I called it the pig trough method.  Now I am going to demonstrate to you why I think it comes in handy

.

Preview 05:43

So, in the last chapter I was talking about the benefits of making your rough assembly be good enough to show people regardless of the fact that it is just a rough cut.  The best way to ensure this is to do a temporary sound mix really quickly as you make your rough assembly edit.  Just for the parts of the scene that need it in order to avoid confusion or to get a certain point across by emphasizing an element of the scene.
Preview 07:35

Now it’s time to prepare your project for the fun part:  Creating an assembly edit of the entire film.  You’ll notice on your checklist that the rough cut for each scene has been finished.  But one of the most frequent mistakes editors make is to just jump in and start cutting.  Before you begin, take your time and make sure that all of your settings are the way that you want them.
Getting Ready to do an Assembly of the Entire Film
02:42

Depending on your film and your personal perspective,  this might be one of the most important elements of the post production process of your film.  If you get this right, you will be able to make a film that you are proud of.  You really have to think it through and decide which order to put each scene in order to make the best film possible.
Think It Through: The Index card Method
04:50
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The Online Edit
4 Lectures 37:27

So, you’ve put all of your scenes in the right order, you’ve gone over the entire film with a fine-toothed comb, you’ve refined the edit over and over again, you’ve made compromises based on the needs of the client, the studio, the producer.   You’ve even ordered a re-shoot of certain scenes and re-inserted them into the film at the exact point that they are needed. The film is as good as you feel it is ever going to get.  So now you’ve locked picture and it’s time to get ready for the sound design.

Setting up your Sound Mix
10:29

Now let’s start adding to the realism of the scene by adding SFX and foley.


Sound Design: SFX and Foley
13:30

 

Whereas I believe that sound fx and foley can be used to add both realism AND emotion to a scene, I think that most of you will agree that even though in certain cases music can add realism to some scenes, generally speaking music is added to the sound design primarily to cue the viewer on how you would like them to feel.  Music generally conveys emotion.

Sound Design: Music
10:15

This isn’t a tutorial about color correction and color grading because that subject deserves an entire course in and of itself.  Instead, I am just going to take the time during this tutorial to just remind you that Color Correction and Color grading is very important AND that you need to hire someone FOR COLOR who really knows what they are doing.  Professional level color correction and grading, just like professional level audio can really make the difference between whether your film gets bought by a distributor or a broadcaster.
Color Correction is so important
03:13
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That's a Wrap!
1 Lecture 00:57

So now your film is completed and you  want to get it out to the world.  Before you even start shooting you should decide which format you would like the film to be exported as.  Will be strictly for web like h.264? Will it be h.265?  Will it go on Vimeo?  Make sure you send it where you want it  put in the render cue of choice and hit enter.  Congratulations!  You just edited your film.

Congratulations!
00:57
About the Instructor
Christopher E. Scott
5.0 Average rating
1 Review
12 Students
1 Course
Film Editor with over 20 years of experience

Hi there, 

My name is Christopher E. Scott and I am a film editor with over 20 years of experience in the film and television industry.  

I have experience editing feature films, music videos, and documentaries that have appeared in theatres, on television, and at film festivals internationally.  In addition, I have done compositing, VFX, and animation for augmented reality installations that have appeared in numerous art galleries and museums in such cities as New York and Istanbul.
I am also the manager  of the "Final Cut Pro Editors" group on LinkedIn with over 21,000 members.

What I can bring to Udemy is the fact that I am a real editor who edits 8 hours a day, 5 days a week for a living.  Plus, I have experience in other aspects of cinema, such as cinematography, screenwriting, directing, as well as acting.  These diverse experiences will make this Udemy course tremendously well-rounded and informative.

I look forward to helping as many people as possible with this editing course.