Lectures

Carnegie Mellon professors, alumni, students and friends regularly lecture on a variety of subjects. Check out some of t

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  • Lectures 36
  • Video 29 Hours
  • Skill Level All Levels
  • Languages English
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Carnegie Mellon professors, alumni, students and friends regularly lecture on a variety of subjects. Check out some of the university lectures here. For more information on Carnegie Mellon, visit www.cmu.edu.

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01:16:27
Carnegie Mellon Professor Randy Pausch (Oct. 23, 1960 - July 25, 2008) gave his last lecture at the university Sept. 18, 2007, before a packed McConomy Auditorium. In his moving presentation, "Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams," Pausch talked about his lessons learned and gave advice to students on how to achieve their own career and personal goals. For more on Randy, visit: http://www.cmu.edu/randyslectureLearn how to support the Randy Pausch Memorial Bridge, visit: http://www.cmu.edu/homepage/images/ex...
01:05:42
Joel Tarr, Carnegie Mellon's Richard S. Caliguiri University Professor of History and Policy, received the 2008 Leonardo da Vinci Medal of the Society for the History of Technology for his outstanding contributions to the history of technology. He has never thought of himself as a historian of technology, and his surprise at receiving the award caused him to reflect back over his life to try to understand what influences shaped his interest in technology and its effects on the city and on the environment. In his Journeys Lecture, he retraces some of these influences from growing up in the industrial city of Jersey City through the influences that Carnegie Mellon and Pittsburgh have had upon him since he joined the university in 1967."Journeys" are special University Lectures in which Carnegie Mellon faculty members and special guests share their reflections on their journeys -- the everyday actions, decisions, challenges and joys that make a life. For more information on this and other lectures, visit www.cmu.edu/uls/journeys
01:10:16
Michael Eric Dyson gave the keynote speech, "King, Obama and The American Dream", at Carnegie Mellon University's Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day celebration on Jan. 19, 2009. Dyson is a professor at Georgetown University, where he has been hailed as an intellectual leader in society and academia.
41:35
Are there types of robots that shouldn't be created? Should we use robots in military combat? Or is there actually nothing to worry about? Carnegie Mellon Robotics Institute professor Illah Nourbakhsh addresses issues raised by recent book Wired for War by P.W. Singer and gives his personal take on ethics and robotics.
01:34:26
What direction will our energy policy take in the next four years? Four leaders give their perspectives on climate change and energy policy and the resulting impact on economic growth and technological innovation.Welcome and introduction by Teresa Heinz
01:33:15
Carnegie Mellon professors Jay Apt, Dave Dzombak, Hyung Kim and David Yaron lead discussion about the future of open access in chemistry. Part of the Carnegie Mellon Libraries 2008-09 Author's Rights and Wrongs series - for more information visit www.library.cmu.edu/AuthorsRights.html
09:09
Bertrade "Betty" Mbom was the student speaker at Carnegie Mellon University's Commencement ceremony on May 18, 2008. Betty received her bachelor's degree in biological sciences.
04:43
Edward Rubin, Alumni Professor of Engineering & Public Policy and Mechanical Engineering, spoke about his work with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) at the Carnegie Mellon University commencement ceremony on May 18, 2008. Dr. Rubin shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Al Gore and other members of the IPCC in December 2007.Featuring: Provost Mark Kamlet, Edward Rubin
19:10
Former U.S. Vice President and climate change expert Al Gore delivered the keynote speech at Carnegie Mellon University's Commencement ceremony on May 18, 2008.Gore was the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize winner with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, of which Carnegie Mellon Engineering and Public Policy professor Ed Rubin was a member.
01:59:38
In a Local Economy lecture at Carnegie Mellon University, Michael Shuman, author of the The Small-Mart Revolution, talks about saving the world by eating locally.Featuring: Michael Shuman http://www.small-mart.org
06:33
Professor Randy Pausch made a surprise return to Carnegie Mellon University to deliver an inspirational speech to the Class of 2008 at the Commencement ceremony on May 18, 2008. Pausch was included in TIME Magazine's 2008 list of the world's 100 most influential people. His book, "The Last Lecture," co-written by Jeff Zaslow of the Wall Street Journal and based on Pausch's now-famous talk "Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams," is a New York Times #1 bestseller.For more on Randy, visit: http://www.cmu.edu/randyslectureLearn how to support the Randy Pausch Memorial Bridge, visit: http://www.cmu.edu/homepage/images/ex...
51:10
Author and Carnegie Mellon alum Scott Berkun shows that much of what we know about innovation is wrong as he explores the history of innovation and creative thinking. Featuring: Scott Berkun http://www.scottberkun.com/
48:45
Carnegie Mellon was the final stop on Microsoft Corp. founder Bill Gates' recent tour of several nationally recognized universities. As founder, chairman and former CEO of Microsoft, Gates revolutionized personal computing in the digital information age. His talk at Carnegie Mellon concluded his farewell lecture tour as he transitions from Microsoft into his new role in the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, whose mission it is to bring innovations in health and learning to the global community. Microsoft is one of the university's top corporate supporters, partnering with Carnegie Mellon in many ways. More than 300 university alumni currently work at Microsoft offices around the globe. Carnegie Mellon is also home to the Microsoft Research-sponsored Center for Computational Thinking, launched in March 2007 in an effort to stimulate collaborative research and educational partnerships. With a lead gift of $20 million, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has made possible the Gates Center, one of two groundbreaking buildings that will create Carnegie Mellon's new School of Computer Science Complex.
40:25
A former fashion writer for Self, Mademoiselle and The New York Times, Carnegie Mellon University Ph.D. candidate Deirdre Clemente's two-part lecture mixes history and humor to assist students in making a strong first impression on employers. She begins with a short presentation on how college students' leisure-focused lifestyle spawned such trends as tennis shoes, jeans, sports coats and khaki pants, and then examines the "seven deadly sins" college students should avoid when dressing for a job interview.
01:08:52
Carnegie Mellon University's president Dr. Jared L. Cohon believes that the goals and plans that you set for yourself can do no more than prepare you to take advantage of the opportunities that arise. Not coincidentally, this is more or less how Carnegie Mellon has led its institutional life for the last several decades. Most important, though, he says, is to enjoy each leg of the journey, no matter where you ultimately end up. Joel Tarr, Carnegie Mellon's Richard S. Caliguiri University Professor of History and Policy, received the 2008 Leonardo da Vinci Medal of the Society for the History of Technology for his outstanding contributions to the history of technology. He has never thought of himself as a historian of technology, and his surprise at receiving the award caused him to reflect back over his life to try to understand what influences shaped his interest in technology and its effects on the city and on the environment. In his Journeys Lecture, he retraces some of these influences from growing up in the industrial city of Jersey City through the influences that Carnegie Mellon and Pittsburgh have had upon him since he joined the university in 1967."Journeys" are special University Lectures in which Carnegie Mellon faculty members and special guests share their reflections on their journeys -- the everyday actions, decisions, challenges and joys that make a life. For more information on this and other lectures, visit www.cmu.edu/uls/journeys
01:01:43
Kai-Fu Lee, President of Google Greater China and Carnegie Mellon School of Computer Science alum, gave the School of Computer Science Distinguished Lecture. In his lecture "Google China -- Can a Multinational Internet Company Succeed in China?", he discusses Google's success in China at a time when virtually every multinational Internet company was failing or pulling out.
01:16:22
Carnegie Mellon Professor Randy Pausch gave a lecture on Time Management at the University of Virginia in November 2007. Randy Pausch -- http://www.randypausch.com -- is a virtual reality pioneer, human-computer interaction researcher, co-founder of Carnegie Mellon's Entertainment Technology Center -- http://www.etc.cmu.edu -- and creator of the Alice -- http://www.alice.org -- software project. The slides for this lecture and high-res downloadable versions of this and other lectures can be found at: http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~robins/Ra...
01:11:19
A panel of Carnegie Mellon researchers discuss global climate change and how we all can be contributors to the solution. Moderated by alumna Dr. Marilyn Bracken (MM'57), President and General Manager of Bracken Associates LLC. Panelists include Steinbrenner Institiute for Environmental Education & Research (SEER) faculty Dr. Lester Lave, Co-Director Carnegie Mellon Electrical Industry Center; Dr. M. Granger Morgan, Director of the Climate Decision Making Center and Edward Rubin, Professor in Engineering and Public Policy and Mechanical Engineering.
47:06
Learn how "Pittsburghese" has come to be such a strong symbol of Pittsburgh's identity. Barbara Johnstone, Professor of Rhetoric and Linguistics in Carnegie Mellon University's Department of English, will trace the history of the dialect, talk about how it is changing and how people across the country are keeping it alive.
48:17
Carnegie Mellon alumnus Ray Baughman (S'64) describes new nanotechnologies.
56:47
It is fashionable to divorce science from exploration, but in Jay Apt's life they have always been intertwined. One of Jay's secondary school teachers said to him while he was between space missions, "Your life has gone in one straight line from the time you were interested in model rockets until now, when you climb aboard the real thing." Jay's reality has not been anything like that linear perception, and both emotional and rational ways of thinking continue to guide him.Joel Tarr, Carnegie Mellon's Richard S. Caliguiri University Professor of History and Policy, received the 2008 Leonardo da Vinci Medal of the Society for the History of Technology for his outstanding contributions to the history of technology. He has never thought of himself as a historian of technology, and his surprise at receiving the award caused him to reflect back over his life to try to understand what influences shaped his interest in technology and its effects on the city and on the environment. In his Journeys Lecture, he retraces some of these influences from growing up in the industrial city of Jersey City through the influences that Carnegie Mellon and Pittsburgh have had upon him since he joined the university in 1967."Journeys" are special University Lectures in which Carnegie Mellon faculty members and special guests share their reflections on their journeys -- the everyday actions, decisions, challenges and joys that make a life. For more information on this and other lectures, visit www.cmu.edu/uls/journeys
21:01
Popular entertainer Bill Cosby delivered the keynote address at Carnegie Mellon University's 2007 commencement ceremony. The experience inspired Mr. Cosby to give Carnegie Mellon its first live mascot, a Scottish terrier named Scotty who arrived in Pittsburgh in May 2008.
01:05:18
Could you really destroy the Vatican using a small amount of antimatter made in the Large Hadron Collider? Thats the question Carnegie Mellons Manfred Paulini seeks to answer in the lecture Angels and Demons: The Science Revealed. Dr. Paulini, an experimental particle physicist and member of the CMS experiment at CERNs Large Hadron Collider, discusses the science facts and fiction in the movie Angels and Demons, based on Dan Browns best-selling novel. Dr. Paulini talks about the physics at the heart of Angels and Demons, which focuses on what happens when matter and antimatter meet. The absence of practically any antimatter in the universe is crucial to our existence, and understanding that absence is one of the big challenges of particle physics. For more about Dr. Paulini's work, visit: http://www.phys.cmu.edu/people/facult..."Angels and Demons: The Science Revealed" is part of the University Lecture Series. For more, visit: http://www.cmu.edu/uls
11:51
Luis von Ahn, Carnegie Mellon University; from Computing Research that Changed the World: Reflections and Perspectives, March 25, 2009,;http://www.cra.org/ccc/locsymposium.php
07:24
College of Engineering dean Pradeep Khosla and engineering and public policy professor Ed Rubin introduce Senator Bob Casey's climate speech on November 13, 2009. The Senator spoke about Pennsylvania's proud industrial and manufacturing heritage, natural resources, and skilled work force as a backdrop for the states transition to a clean energy economy. For more on Senator Casey, visit: http://www.casey.senate.gov/
39:35
On November 13, 2009, Senator Bob Casey delivered a climate speech at Carnegie Mellon University. The Senator spoke about Pennsylvania's proud industrial and manufacturing heritage, natural resources, and skilled work force as a backdrop for the states transition to a clean energy economy. For more on Senator Casey, visit: http://www.casey.senate.gov/
39:23
Carnegie Mellon University's Center for the Arts in Society (CAS) hosted a lecture by Rob Rogers, the award-winning editorial cartoonist for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, titled "How a Cartoonist's Brain Works." In his talk, Rogers, who received his master's degree in fine arts from Carnegie Mellon in 1984 and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 1999, discussed his new book, "No Cartoon Left Behind: The Best of Rob Rogers," which was recently published by Carnegie Mellon University Press. For more on the book, visit: http://www.cmu.edu/universitypress/For more on CAS, visit: http://www.hss.cmu.edu/cas/
31:47
Two Carnegie Mellon professors offered commentary following the lecture by Rob Rogers, the award-winning editorial cartoonist for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Tim Haggerty, director of the Humanities Scholars Program, discussed "Rogers in Historical Perspective: A Faint Glimmer of Hope" and Patricia Bellan-Gillen, the Dorothy L. Stubnitz Professor of Art, presented "Thievery: Cartoons and Comics in Contemporary Art."
39:23
Carnegie Mellon University's Center for the Arts in Society (CAS) hosted a lecture by Rob Rogers, the award-winning editorial cartoonist for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, titled "How a Cartoonist's Brain Works." In his talk, Rogers, who received his master's degree in fine arts from Carnegie Mellon in 1984 and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 1999, discussed his new book, "No Cartoon Left Behind: The Best of Rob Rogers," which was recently published by Carnegie Mellon University Press. For more on the book, visit: http://www.cmu.edu/universitypress/For more on CAS, visit: http://www.hss.cmu.edu/cas/
01:14:10
In his lecture, "Everything I Know about Innovation I Learned from Buggy," alumnus Matthew Wagner (E'87) illustrates his understanding of innovation through examples taken primarily from his experiences at Carnegie Mellon as a founder and chair of Spirit Buggy. For the uninitiated, Buggy is a highly competitive human and gravity powered race unique to CMU and an activity dear to the hearts of many in the CMU community.Innovation is often portrayed as a rather mysterious activity that requires a certain magical spark to be successful. Although there may be some truth in this perspective, Wagner believes that innovation is also a process that can be thoughtfully analyzed and described. In turn, a pragmatic conceptual understanding of innovation can be used to design organizations in a manner that strongly supports successful innovation.For more on Buggy, visit: http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/buggy/...For more on the University Lecture Series, visit: http://www.cmu.edu/uls
31:47
Two Carnegie Mellon professors offered commentary following the lecture by Rob Rogers, the award-winning editorial cartoonist for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Tim Haggerty, director of the Humanities Scholars Program, discussed "Rogers in Historical Perspective: A Faint Glimmer of Hope" and Patricia Bellan-Gillen, the Dorothy L. Stubnitz Professor of Art, presented "Thievery: Cartoons and Comics in Contemporary Art."
01:14:10
In his lecture, "Everything I Know about Innovation I Learned from Buggy," alumnus Matthew Wagner (E'87) illustrates his understanding of innovation through examples taken primarily from his experiences at Carnegie Mellon as a founder and chair of Spirit Buggy. For the uninitiated, Buggy is a highly competitive human and gravity powered race unique to CMU and an activity dear to the hearts of many in the CMU community.Innovation is often portrayed as a rather mysterious activity that requires a certain magical spark to be successful. Although there may be some truth in this perspective, Wagner believes that innovation is also a process that can be thoughtfully analyzed and described. In turn, a pragmatic conceptual understanding of innovation can be used to design organizations in a manner that strongly supports successful innovation.For more on Buggy, visit: http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/buggy/...For more on the University Lecture Series, visit: http://www.cmu.edu/uls
31:47
Two Carnegie Mellon professors offered commentary following the lecture by Rob Rogers, the award-winning editorial cartoonist for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Tim Haggerty, director of the Humanities Scholars Program, discussed "Rogers in Historical Perspective: A Faint Glimmer of Hope" and Patricia Bellan-Gillen, the Dorothy L. Stubnitz Professor of Art, presented "Thievery: Cartoons and Comics in Contemporary Art."
39:23
Carnegie Mellon University's Center for the Arts in Society (CAS) hosted a lecture by Rob Rogers, the award-winning editorial cartoonist for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, titled "How a Cartoonist's Brain Works." In his talk, Rogers, who received his master's degree in fine arts from Carnegie Mellon in 1984 and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 1999, discussed his new book, "No Cartoon Left Behind: The Best of Rob Rogers," which was recently published by Carnegie Mellon University Press. For more on the book, visit: http://www.cmu.edu/universitypress/For more on CAS, visit: http://www.hss.cmu.edu/cas/
31:38
Media scholar Noah Wardrip-Fruin (University of California, Santa Cruz, Computer Science) explores the social and political implications of life simulation in The Sims.  Co-sponsored by the Center for the Arts in Society and The Fine Foundation. For more, visit: www.cmu.edu/cas
30:02
Media scholar Alexandra Juhasz (Pitzer College, Media Studies) explores the social and political implications of video sharing on YouTube. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Arts in Society and The Fine Foundation.For more, visit: www.cmu.edu/cas

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