Arduino and DIY Greenhouse (tiny vege factory) measurements
4.0 (13 ratings)
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Arduino and DIY Greenhouse (tiny vege factory) measurements

Measurement of environment using sensors in your micro-scaled indoor greenhouse / hydroponics as IoT basics
4.0 (13 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
149 students enrolled
Created by Jim K
Last updated 7/2017
English
Current price: $10 Original price: $40 Discount: 75% off
5 hours left at this price!
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Includes:
  • 1 hour on-demand video
  • 6 Articles
  • 16 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • Understand measurements using Arduino
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • Just junior high school level of linear algebra, physics, chemistry, and biology
  • How to make Arduino work on one's own PC
  • Some programming background such as C
  • Preliminary knowledge about basic electricity
Description

This course teaches you how to measure various environmental variables, such as humidity, wind, CO2, EC, and PH, on your greenhouse or micro-scaled so-called vegetable factory as DIY, using relevant sensors and a micro-controller board called Arduino. There are no quizzes provided.

There are sample C programs and wiring diagrams available as well.

Once you're done with the course, you will have some ideas about applying the technique to many other fields as well.

Thank you and enjoy!




Who is the target audience?
  • Hobbyists who love to build something as DIY
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Curriculum For This Course
31 Lectures
01:09:52
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Introduction
2 Lectures 05:25

This is the introduction of the course to explain what our focus is on the subject and what you can expect from the course.

Preview 00:57

The lecture explains very basic electrical contexts that you should have in mind, especially if you are new to measuring something with Arduino, before getting your equipment ready. The content is meant to be applied to vegetable factory implications.

Preview 04:28
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Wind speed measurements
5 Lectures 14:08

Introduction to anemometers, which are used to measure wind conditions. Two examples are shown, and explain how they are used.

Preview 02:08

This explains about the C program that measures wind speed using Arduino and an anemometer with 3-ball-shaped wings. It contains typical conversion of various numeric attributes that can be acquired through measurements, and a linear equation used during the conversion. "Duty cycle" applied to PWM devices is also covered.

Walk through C program - wind speed
05:47

Once we understood the working program, let's actually measures wind speed using a 3-wing anemometer and Arduino, while comparing them to a hand-held anemometer that can data-log in conjunction with a Windows application. Things don't work straightforward. Let's see how they work.

Practice the measurements
03:36

Let's apply the wind-speed measurements on the actual grow shelf. You will also see how fans are placed at the shelf and make sure you stay with appropriate intensity of wind in growing your plants.

Apply to the greenhouse - wind speed
02:37

The course didn't cover how to wire the entire circuit that includes LED, a potentiometer, and a fan. You saw that they had been already built in presentation. You can take a look at the diagram and build your own. 

Wiring diagram and sample C program - wind speed
00:00
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Light intensity measurements
5 Lectures 13:05

Introduction to PAR sensors, which are used to measure intensity of lights. Two specific examples are shown with their comparison, and you will understand why vegetable factories will require specific types of sensors to measure light intensity. 

PAR sensors
03:34

Unfortunately Arduino UNO/Mega doesn't work with only the sensor due to their hardware limitation. Then you need an amplifier to amplify the voltage. The lecture explains how you use the amplifier, manufactured by the same vendor as the sensor.

Amplifier
02:20

Demo to wire the required pieces of equipment. A very typical example to use analog input of Arduino, and some additional electric implications in using the amplifier correctly, such as your choice of power supply. 

Wiring of PAR sensor, its amplifier, and Arduino
02:17

This explains about the C program that measures light intensity using Arduino and a PAR sensor. It contains typical conversion of various numeric attributes that can be acquired through measurements, and a linear equation used during the conversion. 

Walk through C program - light intensity
02:13

Let's apply the light-intensity measurements on the actual grow shelf. You will also see how lights are placed at the shelf and make sure you stay with appropriate intensity of lights in growing your plants. There is one tip to increase light intensity without adding electric consumption.

Apply to the greenhouse - light intensity
02:41
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Humidity measurements
2 Lectures 04:57

Learn about a low-cost humidity sensor. It is simple, and this lecture contains all of explanation of sensors, wiring, and a walk-through of C program in just a few-minutes of video.

Humidity sensor, wiring, and C-program
03:51

Let's apply the humidity measurements on the actual grow shelf. 

Apply to the greenhouse - humidity
01:06
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CO2 measurements
5 Lectures 08:26

Introduction to a CO2 sensor. A particular industry-class reliable model was chosen to use on this vegetable factory.

CO2 Sensors
01:24

Demo to wire the required pieces of equipment. A very typical example to use analog input of Arduino, and some additional electric implications in using the CO2 sensor correctly, such as common ground. 

Wiring of CO2 sensor and Arduino
02:30

This explains about the C program that measures CO2. It contains typical conversion of various numeric attributes that can be acquired through measurements, and a linear equation used during the conversion, together with how you set-up the configuration menu of the sensor. 

Walk through C program - CO2
02:42

Let's apply the CO measurements on the actual grow shelf. 

Apply to the greenhouse - CO2
01:50

The wiring diagram shows how you connect "common ground," which is a must-do in using this sensor with Arduino to measure correctly.

Wiring diagram and sample C program - CO2
00:00
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PH measurements
4 Lectures 08:17

Introduction to PH sensors. One for using with Arduino, and the other is a regular digital sensor. 

PH Sensors
02:23

This explains about the C program that measures PH. A vendor of the sensor provides a program on their web, but you could always modify on your own way; I changed it to a much more simplified version. The programs contain typical conversion of various numeric attributes that can be acquired through measurements, and a linear equation used during the conversion.

Walk through C program - PH
02:20

When you deal with sensors, you are required to "calibrate" sensors occasionally so that they give you accurate measurements at every attempt. There is a key method called "two point calibration" for PH.

Calibration and offset - PH sensors
02:03

Let's apply the PH measurements on the actual grow shelf and see what have to be considered to keep appropriate PH of the nutrient solution.

Preview 01:31
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EC measurements
5 Lectures 14:52

Introduction to EC sensors. One for using with Arduino, and the other is a regular digital sensor. 


EC Sensors
05:23

As we have learned in the lecture "Measurement basics using Arduino," there are certain sensors that output current instead of voltage. This lecture explains how you conduct measurements in such a case, placing resistors as an additional little circuit, and how you get a linear equation from it.

Current output by EC sensor
06:34

This explains about the C program that measures EC, and some indications about what are appropriate EC in growing your plants.

Walk through C program - EC
01:52

Let's apply the EC measurements on the actual grow shelf.

Preview 01:03

The wiring diagram shows how you connect a resistor. It's pretty simple.

Wiring diagram and sample C program - EC
00:00
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Congratulations!
1 Lecture 00:11

Instructor's message at the end of the course.

Closing remark
00:11
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Bonus: Parts List
2 Lectures 00:52

Electronic parts that were used in lectures

Parts List
00:05

List of EC and PH for some vegetables found on the website provided by a local company. (Original content is in Japanese)

EC & PH list of some vegetables
00:46
About the Instructor
Jim K
4.0 Average rating
13 Reviews
149 Students
1 Course
DIY Vegetable factories / aquaponics IoT developer

My family have traditionally been farmers in Northeastern Japan for a few centuries, where the society is aging and sustainability is in question today. Young people go out to cities for white-color jobs. I believe that traditional industries, which are still crucial for our survival, can revive by modernizing their principles and methodologies so that people become more interested to work in those areas.

I am not a native speaker of English, so before you enroll the course please visit the preview first and check if you are comfortable.