Criminal Investigation in the New Millennium
4.7 (81 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
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Criminal Investigation in the New Millennium

The Present, the Past, and the Future: A Community Policing Approach
4.7 (81 ratings)
Instead of using a simple lifetime average, Udemy calculates a course's star rating by considering a number of different factors such as the number of ratings, the age of ratings, and the likelihood of fraudulent ratings.
3,268 students enrolled
Created by Robert T. Meesig
Last updated 12/2015
English
Price: Free
Includes:
  • 12.5 hours on-demand video
  • 66 Supplemental Resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
What Will I Learn?
  • The goals of this course are to answer the following questions about the police criminal investigation process in the US: - How good are the police at solving crime? (Hint – not so good~~) - Who are the detectives and what do they do? - How did we get to where we are, and why? - What can we expect in the future? - How will forensics and technology help? - What will investigations look like in the year 2084? To help find the answers to the above questions, students will learn to use a handy framework to do the following: - IDENTIFY a crime problem (in terms of the phases of a crime) - DESCRIBE the availability of crime information and sources in each crime phase (in terms of space and time) - UNDERSTAND how the various detective models of the past have investigated crime (to see their strengths and weaknesses) - MANIPULATE what was learned to project how developments in forensics and technology, and a new detective model, can address future crime problems.
View Curriculum
Requirements
  • You would probably get more out of the course if you had already taken an introductory course in criminal justice or policing, or if you had some general familiarity with our criminal justice system in the US. However, that's not critical, and this course should, in any case, prove to be an interesting and rewarding experience in and of itself. Other than an open mind and a desire to learn, no special materials or actions are needed for the course.
Description

This FREE course addresses the following issues:

- How good are we at solving crime in the US? (Hint – not so good~~)


- Who are the detectives and what do they do?


- How did we get into this situation, and why?


- What can we expect in the future?

- And just how much can forensics and technology be expected help investigations?

To find answers to these and other questions, we explore the criminal investigation process of the present, the past, and the future.

We present an overview of the subject in a listener-friendly and informative way. It is scripted to be understood by the casual observer, as well as the experienced investigator and the aspiring academic.

This course is rooted in the research literature and is amply referenced and well-cited. It provides some of the most comprehensive and current information available on the process.

It does NOT teach how to be an investigator. Instead, it teaches ABOUT the investigation process itself.

The course consists of about 58 lectures ranging from five to 20 minutes in length (about 12 hours total). The lectures are divided into six sections addressing the following:

(1) Where are We?
(2) Who are the Detectives and What Do They Do?
(3) How Did We Get Here?
(4) Where are We Going?
(5) Where Do We Want to Go?
(6) The Year “2084.”

To guide us through the sections, students will learn to use a HANDY FRAMEWORK to do the following:

1. IDENTIFY a crime problem (in terms of the phases of a crime).

2. DESCRIBE the availability of crime information and sources in each crime phase (in terms of space and time).

3. UNDERSTAND how the various detective models of the past have investigated crime (to see their strengths and weaknesses).

4. MANIPULATE what we learned to project how developments in forensics and technology, and a new detective model, can address the crime problems of the future.

Who is the target audience?
  • The targeted audience for this course ranges from the casual observer to the experienced investigator and the aspiring academic.
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Curriculum For This Course
58 Lectures
12:34:58
+
SECTION 1: WHERE ARE WE?
16 Lectures 03:33:05
  • List of lectures in Section 1
  • Course does NOT teach how to be an investigator, but ABOUT the investigation PROCESS it selfc
  • Course is based on research and is amply referenced
S1 L1 WELCOME!!
03:30

  • In this lecture, students will learn the following:
    • How the idea of the course came about
    • How the course is organized
    • How the course is taught
    • How the quizzes are organized
S1 L2 COURSE DESIGN
17:47

  • The value of experience is discussed.
  • Five major crime categories and their costs to society are set forth.
S1 L3 OVERVIEW & MAJOR CRIME CATEGORIES
12:47

    • Topics covered:
      • The National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) and the Uniform Crime Report (UCR).
      • Definitions of terms regarding police agencies.
      • Three categories of police agencies.
S1 L4 COUNTING CRIME & AGENCIES
15:32

  • Perspectives:
    • 50 million species
    • 200 empires in 5,000 years
    • The most complex form of behavior in the universe
    • The job of police
  • Crime:
    • Exists only in the present
    • Two main sources of crime info - people & things
      • The primary source of crime info - PEOPLE!
S1 L5 THEORY
16:06

  • First develop a framework -
  • In order to do the following:
    • IDENTIFY a crime problem (in terms of the phases of a crime)
    • DESCRIBE the availability of crime info and sources in each crime phase (in terms of space and time)
    • UNDERSTAND how the various detective models of the past have investigated crime (to see their strengths and weaknesses)
    • MANIPULATE what we learned to project how developments in forensics and technology, and a new detective model, can address the crime problems of the future
  • IDUM
  • CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK CHART -BURGLARY
S1 L6 A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK
15:34

  • What the framework can reveal about crime and sources of crime info:
    • Preventing crime and victims.
    • The pain, and the choices.
S1 L7 THE CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK (CONT'D)
12:00

  • Why focus on just UCR crimes and just the local police agencies category?
  • The three phases of the TIP as seen through the CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK.
S1 L8 THE TRADITIONAL INVESTIGATION PROCESS (TIP)
16:53

  • The acronym CUISC is explained.
  • Collecting crime info from people and things.
  • The "Sherlock Holmes" of France (Locard).
S1 L9 CUISC - COLLECTING INFO
11:36

  • Using information from things (labs, data bases).
  • CUIPDSC - what's that, and how do you pronounce it?
S1 L10 CUISC - USING INFO
10:31

  • UCR crime clearance rates - why no change in four decades?
  • So who solves crime, anyway?
  • FARMLAMB/MRRABLVA, eh?
  • UCR clearance crimes and clearance rates chart.
S1 L11 UCR CRIME CLEARANCE RATES
11:48

  • So is the US better or worse than other countries?
  • List of selected countries by international homicide rates.
S1 L12 INTERNATIONAL MURDER RATES
08:58

  • The police gateway.
  • The CJ filter - not good news.
  • Effectiveness - WHAT????
S1 L13 CUISC EFFECTIVENESS
10:57

  • Why have crime rates decreased so much?
  • Why don't people report crime?
  • Why don't we do proactive investigations?
S1 L14 CUISC CRIME TRENDS
19:33

  • The core of our CJ system.
  • Assembly line vs. obstacle course.
S1 L15 CRIME CONTROL VS DUE PROCESS
12:15

  • OMG - are we the problem-o?
  • So does crime pay?
  • Section I summary.
S1 L16 OMG, & DOES CRIME PAY?
17:18

There are five quizzes in the course, presenting a total of 100 questions (one point per question). Most are True-False, with some Multiple Choice thrown in.

Most of the questions are straight forward. Some are obvious (gimmes), some are a little tricky, and a few are stinkers.

The Section 1 and 2 quizzes are 20 questions each.

The Section 3 quiz is 40 questions.

The Section 4 and 5 quizzes are 10 questions each.

There is no quiz in Section 6.

Good luck!


Section 1 Quiz 1
20 questions
+
SECTION 2: WHO ARE THE DETECTIVES AND WHAT DO THEY DO?
6 Lectures 01:24:57
  • Dick Tracy and the public mindset
  • List of lectures in this section
S2 L17 INTRODUCTION
02:02

  • What the research says about who detectives are.
  • Research conclusions.
S2 L18 WHO ARE THE DETECTIVES?
19:41

  • Percentages, skills, training, job
  • Time spent
  • Do detectives solve crime?
S2 L19 WHAT ELSE THE RESEARCH SAYS
16:36

  • Goals.
  • Elements of proof.
  • Documentation.
  • Identify & Arrest (ID/A).
  • Search & Seizure (S/S).
  • Interviews.
S2 L20 WHAT DO THEY DO?
18:07

  • INTERROGATION.
  • CORROBORATION.
S2 L21 WHAT DO THEY DO (CONT'D)?
15:31

  • What has changed?
  • What has not changed?
  • Concluding observations.
  • Summary.
S2 L22 ANYTHING CHANGED?
13:00

Twenty more questions - watch out for these!

Section 2 Quiz
20 questions
+
SECTION 3: HOW DID WE GET HERE?
16 Lectures 03:18:57
  • The following will be addressed in this section:
    • Three eras of policing.
    • Civvies, speeders & perspectives.
    • Development of local, private & federal agencies.
    • Detective models.
    • Effects on CUIPDSC.
    • Growth of forensic science & technology.
    • Recent survey & study.
S3 L23 INTRODUCTION
02:39

  • Who invented the police?
  • Two models of social control.
S3 L24 SOCIAL CONTROL MODELS
09:58

  • The Government Spy.
  • The "Father of Modern Criminology" (Vidocq).
  • The British model.
S3 L25 THE GOVERNMENT SPY
11:11

  • The "Father of Modern Policing" (Peel) & the LMPD.
  • The Political Era (1840s - early 1900s).
S3 L26 THE LMPD & THE POLITICAL ERA
19:10

  • Evolution of investigations in the US
  • Why civvies?
  • Civvies & speeders
  • Secretive Rogues - deja vu
S3 L27 CIVVIES & SPEEDERS, & SECRETIVE ROGUES
12:36

  • FORENSIC SCIENCE IN THE 19TY CENTURY – THE BEGINNING.
  • THE FIRST – & “GREATEST” – CLASSICAL DETECTIVES.
  • DETECTIVE GENRE icons.
S3 L28 FORENSICS & THE CLASSICAL DETECTIVE #1
10:44

  • THE REFORM ERA (EARLY 1900S – 1970S) & POLICE PROFESSIONALIZATION.
  • THE INQUISITOR DETECTIVE.
  • INQUISITOR DETECTIVE icons.
S3 L29 THE REFORM ERA & THE INQUISITOR DETECTIVE
10:04

  • FORENSIC SCIENCE IN THE 20TH CENTURY – GROWING.
  • THE HARD-BOILED CLASSICAL DETECTIVE – A HOLLYWOOD FAVORITE.
  • OUR HERO! (SIGH!) (QUESTION MARK?)
S3 L30 FORENSICS & THE CLASSICAL DETECTIVE #2
17:33

  • THE “PINKS” – THE ORIGINAL PRIVATE EYE.
  • BURNS – THE AMERICAN SHERLOCK HOLMES.
S3 L31 PRIVATE DETECTIVES
09:01

  • Perspective, and another perspective.
  • The rise of the Bureaucrat Detective.
  • Legal reforms.
  • So that's how we got here!
S3 L32 PERSPECTIVES & THE BUREAUCRAT DETECTIVE
16:42

  • Local & federal agencies
  • The FBI & Hoover
  • The Church Committee & the WALL
S3 L33 FEDERAL AGENCIES - THE FBI
14:45

  • Worse off than the FBI - tough stuff.
  • In defense of detectives.
S3 L34 FEDERAL AGENCIES - THE DEA
12:48

  • The Community Policing Era (1970s - present).
  • Use OVERT MEANS of working with the community to PREVENT, DETECT & SOLVE crime.
S3 L35 THE COMMUNITY POLICING ERA
07:32

  • The first-ever nationally representative survey.
  • A recent survey of investigation training.
S3 L36 THE SURVEY
14:07

  • Community Policing & murder clearance rates.
  • Does Community Policing help to solve crime?
S3 L37 THE STUDY
19:19

  • FORENSICS BY THE YEAR 2000.
  • THE CLASSICAL DETECTIVE – WHERE TO NOW?
S3 L38 FORENSICS & THE CLASSICAL DETECTIVE #3
10:48

This one is 40 questions, so be sharp and dig in!

Section 3 Quiz
40 questions
+
SECTION 4: WHERE ARE WE GOING?
4 Lectures 31:19
  • The 9/11 disaster.
  • The Church Committee pendulum and security vs. liberty.
  • 9/11 aftermath - another key pivotal point in the criminal investigation process.
S4 L39 INTRODUCTION
03:21

  • Effects of 9/11
  • 9/11 Commission recommendation areas
  • The WALL vs. "unity of effort"
  • Tyranny vs. tyranny
S4 L40 9/11
09:05

  • Effects of 9/11.
  • 9/11 Commission recommendation areas.
  • The WALL vs. "unity of effort."
  • Tyranny vs. tyranny.
S4 L41 THE PATRIOT ACT & BIG BROTHER
12:37

  • Forensics exponential development, & a little poem.
  • The Classical Detective - multi-pronged~~~
S4 L42 FORENSICS & THE CLASSICAL DETECTIVE #4
06:16

Only ten easy questions - how about that?

Section 4 Quiz
10 questions
+
SECTION 5: WHERE DO WE WANT TO GO?
6 Lectures 01:24:09
  • Opinions.
  • Lessons learned.
  • A Community Policing "Three-fer."
  • What's a Community Policing Detective?
  • Civvies & foot temperatures.
S5 L43 INTRODUCTION
04:20

  • A nice overview.
S5 L44 LESSONS LEARNED
18:59

  • All crime is LOCAL!!!
  • Is Community Policing a game-changer?
  • Three Community Policing assets - force multiplier, common goals, & OVERT!
S5 L45 CRIME & COMMUNITY POLICING
18:48

  • Forensics - just the beginning - AGAIN!
  • Technology.
  • The Classical Detective - recasting? Whatever.
S5 L46 FORENSICS & THE CLASSICAL DETECTIVE #5
15:16

  • OVERT CUIPDSC.
  • The Boston Marathon Bombers & the Inform-and-Alert Bunny.
  • Detective Models chart.
S5 L47 THE COMMUNITY POLICING DETECTIVE
17:08

  • Uniforms, posh jump suits, or civvies?
  • Final words - IDUM, history's lessons, & the future.
S5 L48 CIVVIES AGAIN & SOME FINAL WORDS
09:38

OK, OK, I'm such a softie! The quiz really isn't that much of a stinker~

Ten questions. You know all the answers already - if you/ve been paying attention - so go for it! I even threw in a "gimme."

Section 5 Quiz
10 questions
+
SECTION 6: "2084"
10 Lectures 02:22:31
  • This section covers the following:
    • The new tech & investigative techniques
    • CUIPDSC effects on Victimless & Political crimes
    • How students can use the Conceptual Framework
    • The results, the future, the Answer, and the wrap-up
S6 L49 INTRODUCTION
05:16

  • Cameras
  • Recollections - the US, Korea, Vietnam, Iran, Europe, & back to the US
S6 L50 FUTURE TECH - PART I
18:15

  • HOW WILL TECHNOLOGY AFFECT ID/A?
  • THE 90,000 “UNKNOWN PEOPLE” & NANOBOTS.
  • ‘UNKNOWNS” ICONS.
S6 L51 ID/A
10:56

  • S/S - Locard & mechanical sniffers.
  • I/I - Google face-readers, & liars beware!
S6 L52 S/S & I/I
13:10

  • The Conceptual Framework
  • The store burglary thingie - any help
  • CUISC & CUIPDSC
S6 L53 THE CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK & PROPERTY CRIME
19:53

  • THE ME-KNIFE-DEAD BODY THINGIE – ANY HELP?
  • ANY HELP CHART – MURDER & VIOLENT CRIMES.
  • THE BOSTON MARATHON BOMBERS SCENARIO – ANY HELP?
  • ANY HELP CHART – TERRORISM & POLITICAL CRIMES.
S6 L54 VIOLENT CRIME & TERRORISM
17:49

  • What's a "denouement?"
  • Summary - IDUM
  • Any Help - Perspectives chart
S6 L55 THE DENOUEMENT
04:44

  • Robocops.
  • Nanobot imprinters.
  • Terrorism - you can do this!
  • Buuuut--
  • About being wrong.
S6 L56 PART II
15:23

  • COVERT + CONSTRAINTS = CUISC + INEFFECTIVE TIP.
  • OVERT + COMMUNITY POLICING = CUIPDSC + CRIME REDUCTION.
  • COMMUNITY POLICING Detective chart - Plusses & Minuses.
S6 L57 THE ANSWER (?)
19:56

  • So?
  • My view - power "is" the people.
  • Well done, & the retirement thingie.
S6 L58 WRAPPING UP
17:09
About the Instructor
Robert T. Meesig
4.7 Average rating
81 Reviews
3,268 Students
1 Course
LtCol, USAF (retired), Ph.D.

I served 26 years as a Special Agent in the Air Force Office of Special Investigations, which is abbreviated as the AFOSI, or just OSI, for short. The AFOSI is the major investigations and counterintelligence agency in the United States Air Force. My overseas assignments included five years in Korea, 27 months in Vietnam, six months in Iran, and 3 ½ years at Ramstein Air Base in Germany. I served in field, command, and staff positions in AFOSI, and I retired from the Air Force in 1989 as a Lieutenant Colonel.

I earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology from the University of Rochester in NY, in 1963; a Master of Arts degree in Correctional Counseling from Chapman College in CA, in 1977; and a Master of Science degree in Criminal Justice from Michigan State University, in 1994. I received my Ph.D. degree in Criminal Justice from Michigan State University in 2004, and taught policing and investigation courses for six years as an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminal Justice at Grand Valley State University in Michigan.

I am presently retired.