Writing Comics: A Comprehensive Guide
4.5 (87 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
462 students enrolled

Writing Comics: A Comprehensive Guide

Learn the ins and outs of writing comic books from a seasoned pro.
4.5 (87 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
462 students enrolled
Created by Stefan Petrucha
Last updated 11/2018
English
English [Auto-generated]
30-Day Money-Back Guarantee
This course includes
  • 3 hours on-demand video
  • 3 downloadable resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
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What you'll learn
  • How to write comic books like a pro
  • How and why comics work
  • The writer's place in the production flow
  • How to create clear descriptions that inspire artists
  • How to pitch your comic stories
  • The different ways artists and writers collaborate
  • How to properly format your scripts
  • How to define character through dialogue
  • How to fit your words into the small space of a panel
Requirements
  • No artistic ability required - curiosity and a desire to learn are all you need
Description

A comprehensive look at creating comic books specifically for the writer. NOT a course in drawing, these two hours and forty minutes of video lectures by comic veteran Stefan Petrucha combine nuts-and-bolts tips, rules and insider info with easy-to-understand theory. They cover everything from the basics, to panel descriptions that inspire visuals, character-driven dialogue, the writer’s relationship with the artist and the industry, and much more. Not just about superheroes, the course treats the graphic novel as an open medium capable of expressing any content from genre to poetry.

Who this course is for:
  • Anyone interested in writing comic books for profit or pleasure
Course content
Expand all 11 lectures 02:48:37
+ Getting Started
3 lectures 28:18

Introduces the course, the instructor's background, the reasoning behind this whole darn thing, and provides a pithy summary of what's in store.

Preview 07:52

A bit of history, the various comic book publishing formats, comic book terms, where the words go and, for the absolute beginner, how to read a comic.

Comic Book Basics
09:52

A close look at what makes comics work, why they’re different from other media, and at the same time equally valid as a form of entertainment, education and self-expression.

Preview 10:34
+ Workflow and Pitching
2 lectures 30:46

Where the writer fits into the mainstream comics workflow, how that influences not only the way writers are paid, but how they create, and the two most common methods that writers, artists and editors use to collaborate – the Marvel Way and the Full Script.

The Writer's Role
11:29

A brief look at story basics, followed by an in depth description of pitching stories, how to fit your content into a the short space of a pitch, and how that plays into two very different, but equal, writing methods.

Pitches, Springboards and Summaries
19:17
+ Scripting Nuts and Bolts
4 lectures 01:21:26

A look at how words and pictures change one another, what exactly constitutes a comic book, and the Seven Types of Word/Picture Relationships as defined by Scott McCloud.

Word and Art
24:21

The difference between a dramatic and a physical panel description, the visible and invisible elements of comic storytelling, how to use film terms in comic scripts, and implying composition without spelling it out.

Panel Descriptions Part 1
19:24

Ordering panel descriptions for maximum clarity and results, motivating reader movement between panels and pages, how much fits where, and how to choose panel size and subject.

Panel Descriptions Part 2
19:58

How to write in the limited space of a panel, deal with exposition, break up dialogue for dramatic effect, the three ways dialogue defines character, and the limits of dialogue in comics

The Words the Reader Sees
17:43
+ The Most Important Lecture Ever
1 lecture 11:34

How to recognize and eliminate the biggest bane to good writing -- the three types of Redundancy, and how repetition, when properly used, can be a useful tool.

Redundancy
11:34
+ Reaching Readers
1 lecture 16:33

A look at script formatting, the instructor's personal experience with the comic book industry, and the three paths to readers.

Writing Comics for a Living
16:33