Writing a Fiction Novel For Beginners
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Writing a Fiction Novel For Beginners

Part 1
0.0 (0 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
5 students enrolled
Created by Memory Bengesa
Last updated 7/2019
English
English [Auto]
Current price: $13.99 Original price: $19.99 Discount: 30% off
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This course includes
  • 2 hours on-demand video
  • 4 articles
  • 11 downloadable resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
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What you'll learn
  • Will learn the basic core structure of writing
  • Basic preparation to build confidence in a novice student
  • Have the know how to write
  • To write at ease with a simple understanding of what to do
  • Discover basic techniques to help you start and finish the novel
  • Resources included
Course content
Expand all 19 lectures 02:03:36
+ Introduction a little about me
1 lecture 04:56

What is your Story?

1. What if?

EXAMPLE: What if Sheila came home and found her husband gone and she could not get a hold of him?

Preview 04:56
+ Section 1 What is Your Story?
4 lectures 19:55

What is your Story?

1. What if?

EXAMPLE: What if Sheila came home and found her husband gone and she could not get a hold of him?

Preview 02:47

What is the theme? (Seven Deadly Sins)

1. Lust

2. Greed

3. Envy

4. Sloth

5. Anger

6. Gluttony

7. Pride

Human Flaws:

1. Addiction

2. Immorality

3. Aversion

4. Poor Judgement

5. Incompetence

6. Fear

Preview 04:40

Preparation:

1. Notebook

2. Word Document (and or any writing software)

3. Dictionary

4. Research friendly toolbar


Suggested Writing software: (You do not have to get these immediately, I spent most of my writing career writing on word without the software)

1. Scrivener

2. Novel Factory

3. Grammarly

4. Adobe (PDF)



Preparation & Resources
03:40

Premise:

Every story should contain all five of the major story elements, which are:

  1. ·Character

    ·Situation

    ·Objective

    ·Opponent

    ·Disaster

--The Novel Factory


Premise & Resources
08:48
+ Understanding the rules (or...are there rules?)
3 lectures 13:01

James Patterson has claimed to do whatever he wants when it comes to writing, however, none of us are on James Patterson’s level yet (maybe I speak for myself), however, the best way to completing a Manuscript is by doing what is typically expected.

When it comes to writing rules...
11:45

When you read Fiction books, pay attention to the lines of dialogue, I usually keep mine between five and six lines of dialogue and action, it gets a little tricky because you can technically have a lot of dialogue as long as you break it up with action in between.

So what are these rules?
00:57

1. What is a manuscript? It is a book before it gets published.

2. What is the length of a novel? 40,000 words and above make a Fiction Novel.

3. What is a Novella? A Fiction book with about 17,000 to 30,000 words.


Resources: (recommended but not required)

1. Characters & Viewpoint by Orson Scott Card.

2. Dialogue Techniques and Exercises for Crafting effective dialogue by Gloria Kempton.

3. The Emotion Thesaurus A Writers Guide to Character Expression by Angela Ackerman & Becca Puglisi.

Some must know lingo with resources included
00:19
+ Lets Write!
6 lectures 55:38

1. Formatting: Margins on a Microsoft Word Document; click LAYOUT, click MARGINS, I usually have all Margins at 1”

2. Word count and Chapters: The word count is totally up to you, remember the different word count categories as detailed above, the difference between a Novella and a Novel, what I usually do is shoot for a round about per each chapter, for instance I can say I will write 2,000 per each chapter, however I can write more or less, its just a base point that allows me to understand the number of chapters.

3. Outlining: I am a Pantser, I use a new notebook for each project, I keep it by my computer so I can jot down important information and or one sentence events. Find what works for you, there are so many ways to write an outline and I am pretty sure what ever you come up with will be productive for you.

4. What is your style? Once again this is developed by practicing to write, the style is your signature, for instance; you can tell a difference in James Patterson’s writing versus someone else, sure you can kind of write like “so-and-so” but your writing is still germane to you. This is also what your readers will gravitate towards each time you publish a book.

5. Point of View (POV): When writing fiction you are going to have to determine who is telling the story, there is First Person View which is typically “I” this is the point in which one individual is narrating the story, Then there is Second Person View which is still tricky to me, however its when you involve the reader into the writing so in a sense you are using “you,” Third Person View (my favorite), is usually being told by the narrator who is the Author but in that moment the Narrator slash Author can be telling a story as a elderly grandma, yet in reality the Author is 25, nevertheless, this is a point of view that tends to be omniscient when it comes to all the characters. (POV) is a huge topic that needs your continual attention, it’s impossible to cover it all, there are great books that you can keep as a resource.

Some would argue and say there is no for real rules on POV’s however, I suggest for you to pick one and stick with that one in your book as a first time writer, once you have some skin in the game you can be like James Patterson who starts of in First Person, then shifts to the third person view without losing an audience (He does this so ever flawlessly).

TIP: When I started writing Fiction I used to buy a bunch of random fiction books, I wouldn’t even read the blurb, I would just pick and buy them, my purpose being when I started to read the book my goal was to determine the point of view which in turn helped me out a lot.

6. A story has a Start, Middle and Ending.


All About Writing
15:17

Act 1 (Start)

Act 2 (Middle)

Act 3 (End)


Recommended read: The Heros Journey By Joseph Campbell

3 Act writing structure for beginners
00:06

1. Formatting

2. Word count and Chapters

3. Outlining

4. What is your style?

5. Point of View (POV)


TIP: When I started writing Fiction I used to buy a bunch of random fiction books, I wouldn’t even read the blurb, I would just pick and buy them, my purpose being when I started to read the book my goal was to determine the point of view which in turn helped me out a lot.

6. A story has a Start, Middle and Ending.


All About Writing
02:06

Lecture 8 Act 1 The start of the story

1. Hook

2. Backstory

3. Trigger

Act 1
14:42

Lecture 8 Act 2 sometimes known as the middle of the story


1. Crisis

2. Struggle

3. Epiphany

Act 2
12:19

Lecture 9 Act 3 The ending of the story

1. Plan

2. Climax

3. Ending


Section 3 Resources: Scrivener is great writing software that keeps everything in one, for those that want to outline, research etc., Scrivener is your go to, I once dabbled with Beat Sheets for outlining when I was trying different things, you have to check out www.JamiGold.com she has created amazing Beat Sheets free for download as well as other writing sheets that are useful, Beat Sheets are pretty cool for both a Panster and a plotter, I love how simple and precise they are, there is the Snowflake method…I mean there is a lot of ways to skin the cat, you have to play around with it and find what works, Novel Factory software is really neat for beginners, it literally helps you each step of the way from your premise to growing the outline into a book.


· Act I - Setup: Exposition, Inciting Incident, Plot Point One

· Act II - Confrontation: Rising Action, Midpoint, Plot Point Two

· Act III - Resolution: Pre-Climax, Climax, Denouement

https://blog.reedsy.com/three-act-structure/


Act 3 & Resources
11:07
+ What Type of Book are you writing?
3 lectures 21:37
Are you a Plotter or Pantser?
05:41
Fiction Genres & Resources
03:07
How many Editors does one need?
12:49
+ Resources
2 lectures 08:28
Book cover Designs and continued writing development
03:48
Closing Remarks
04:40
Requirements
  • Computer
Description

Suffice it to say; most people have a story in them, and some are actually itching to place the story on paper as a book? Problem is, like most I was scared to start writing because I didn't think I knew what to do and when I mustered a little courage it was about three manuscripts and 300,000 words later that I found out it was ALL written WRONG!!! Because of my earlier experiences I decided to compile a very basic beginners course to get you in the seat and writing.



Who this course is for:
  • Anyone who want's to write a book
  • Beginners
  • Aspiring Authors