USAF Supply Chain Management 346 / Equipment Specialist 1670
4.4 (13 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
38 students enrolled

USAF Supply Chain Management 346 / Equipment Specialist 1670

Learn the roles and responsibilities of Supply Chain Managers (0346) and Equipment Specialist (1670)
4.4 (13 ratings)
Course Ratings are calculated from individual students’ ratings and a variety of other signals, like age of rating and reliability, to ensure that they reflect course quality fairly and accurately.
38 students enrolled
Created by Mark Gingrass
Last updated 6/2019
English
English [Auto]
Current price: $13.99 Original price: $19.99 Discount: 30% off
5 hours left at this price!
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This course includes
  • 2 hours on-demand video
  • 4 downloadable resources
  • Full lifetime access
  • Access on mobile and TV
  • Certificate of Completion
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What you'll learn
  • - Roles of the Supply Chain Program Manger and Equipment Specialist
  • National Stock Numbers and DLA history
  • - Excel beyond getting hired
  • - Aircraft Availability Metrics
  • - Depot Supply Chain Management Overview (DSCM)
  • - Excess Inventory Demand Forecasting
  • - Exponential Smoothing, Moving Averages and Simple Average
  • - Order of Use Codes, National Stock Numbers, Interchangeability, Suitable Substitution
  • - Precipitous Drops
  • - Readiness Spares Parts, Peace Operating Stock, Due Out Maintenance
  • - Supply Chain Management Discrepancies
  • - Administrative Gated Process (Art of The Possible)
  • - Supply Chain Management
  • - Understand Product Lifecycles
  • - Demand Data Exchange (DDE)
  • - Demand History Adjustments (DHA)
Requirements
  • - Basic math
  • - Basic business terms
Description

Learn some of the major roles and responsibilities of a Supply Chain Program Manager and an Equipment Specialist.

Who should take this course?

  • Aspiring to become an ES

  • Want help interviewing for an ES position

  • Already in an ES role and want to be more knowledgeable

  • Manage programs involving an ES

  • Want to learn logistics management within the DoD

I am continuously upgrading this course with improvement and new content. Sign up for this course today!

Who this course is for:
  • - Government Workers
  • - Department of Defense
  • - Contractors
  • - Mechanics
  • - Item Manager
  • - Equipment Specialist
  • - Program Managers
  • - Logistics Specialist
  • - 346
  • - 1670
  • - 2210
Course content
Expand 16 lectures 01:49:36
+ Supply Chain Management / Equipment Specialist
16 lectures 01:49:36

The Department of Defense (DoD) has hundreds of thousands of end items encompassing thousands of different types and models ranging from small arms to radars to tanks and aircraft. Many of these weapon systems and other end items are complex systems with many expensive components. For many of these components, when they fail or are replaced in scheduled maintenance, it costs less to replace them with a repaired, refurbished spare part rather than buy a new one. Such items are called reparables within DoD. Parts that are not economical to repair or cannot be repaired are termed consumables.

Preview 04:17

An Equipment Specialist (ES) from the 1670 series is an individual or position responsible for assisting the acquisition team during the development and production phases and for technical management of a system, subsystem, or commodity during the sustainment phase of a program.

Learn some of the major roles and responsibilities of an ES.

Who should take this course?

  • Aspiring to become an ES

  • Want help interviewing for an ES position

  • Already in an ES role and want to be more knowledgeable

  • Manage programs involving an ES

  • Want to learn logistics management within the DoD


What you will learn in this course:

  • Roles and Responsibilities of an ES

  • Material Requirements

  • Consumable Requirements

  • Secondary Items Requirements System (SIRS)

  • Initial Requirements

  • Reclamation and Disposal

Introduction
00:52
Demand Forecasting
03:48

Learn about what a National Stock Number is and how to read one. Learn how the Defense Logistics Agency was formed and why. Learn why there needed to be a central management authority over parts within 11 different government agencies.

Preview 06:17

Answer this question about NSN to check your progress.

NSN Check!
1 question

Excess inventory has pros and cons depending on a variety of factors. Sometimes, a reserve stock of parts on hand is needed because the cost of not having a part immediately is too high.

Inventory has costs. It costs money to store, secure, and account for the parts. It has hidden costs as well. For example, the excess parts cost money to manufacture, repair, or buy. That money could have been used for making different parts that may be needed more.

Excess inventory may become obsolete or degraded. Some parts require temperature controls, which is costly, or expiration dates such as chemicals or rubber.

In this short video, I will describe some of the ways to forecast a proper amount of parts based on “programs” and historical “usage.”

Excess Inventory
07:28

Precipitious Drop - A sharp, steep drop — whether it's in a stock price, a roller coaster, or a star's popularity — could be described as a precipitous one. Put simply, precipitous means perilously steep. Look closely and you'll spot most of the word precipice (a sheer, almost vertical cliff) in precipitous. - dictionary.com

In this video I describe how users of assets can cause a sharp decline in inventory levels. I describe how demands that are incorrect can cause drops in inventory.

In this video I will talk about:

  • How to deal with miss-identified parts

  • How to handle Precipitious Drops in supply

  • Why demand levels change

  • Production levels

  • Define Requisition Objective (RO) levels

Precipitious Drops
04:12

Test your progress.

Answer this question about Precipitous Drops
1 question

Learn about Demand History Adjustments (DHAs) and Demand Data Exchange (DDE) in the Air Force & DLA.

Demand History Adjustments and Demand Data Exchange with DLA
05:18

In this video, I summarize some of the roles of the DSCM (pronounced “disk-um”) within the Depot Supply Chain Management organizations.

In short, the DSCM team understands the future requirements for the Air Force (AF) and makes sure the trickle down supply effects are supportable as well.

  1. Air Force Mission Predicted

  2. Air Force Supply positions itself to meet the mission needs

  3. Support for the AF Supply and Depot Repairs is altered (increase/decrease)

  4. Loggies and DSCM team mitigate shortfalls or gaps in support using some of these techniques listed:

    1. Expedited Deliveries

    2. Expedited Purchase Requests

    3. Substitute Parts

    4. Engineering Waivors

    5. Lateral Support

    6. Other

  5. Depot Repairs the parts

  6. Air Force Operations Execute Missions

  7. Back to step 1, repeat.

Depot Supply Chain Management Overview
07:46
  • Supply Pipeline data

  • What is Readiness Spares Kits

  • What is Peace Operating Stock

  • Priority filling back orders

  • Grounding/Non-grounding MICAP

  • Define F, A, Y and Z condition parts

  • Define In Work (INW) and On Work Order (OWO)

  • When to Buy versus Repair

Readiness Spares Kits, Peace Operating Stock, Due Outs
05:14

This is an introduction for the next video about Order of Use codes.

Order of Use Codes Intro
03:52

OOU Codes are found in the D043C System

  • What are Order of Use (OOU) Codes

  • Relationship between Stock Numbers (one way, two way)

  • What is an NSN

  • How to read OOU Codes

  • What are OOU Code Subgroups

Order of Use Codes, National Stock Numbers, Interchangeability
08:03
  • Average

  • Moving Averages

  • Exponential Smoothing

    • Choosing a good alpha (weight)

    • Difference between new data and old data

  • Forecasting the future needs

Exponential Smoothing, Moving Averages, Simple Averages
10:24

Supply Chain Management (SCM) activities should be designed to maximize customer value and achieve a competitive advantage. Supply chains should be efficient and timely. A full supply chain encompasses product development, sourcing (contracts), production (repairs), and logistics (transportation), as well as the software suites to handle the information exchanges.

The product (our assets) has to ultimately get to the end user, or customer. When the customer doesn’t receive the parts that were planned, it could have overwhelming negative effects.

One issue with supply chains is that they are usually very complex; consisting of may pillars or functional areas separated by walls or even geographically. We call these “stove pipes” sometimes. Ownership, or command over each “stove pipe” is usually separated as well. This can cause many discrepancies within the supply chain. Ineffective supply chains will lose competitive advantage and can be very costly.

Assets, or parts, must be physically stored, transported, and accounted for. Information about the flows of the physical products must be documented in order to demand plan for the future, or forecast. This is how we determine when to place an order, what quantities to order, etc. This also can involve contracting for brand new parts, organic (in house) repairs of the parts, or a combination.

This video will describe a type of error that can have huge ramifications if not addressed timely. Using a Report of Discrepancy (ROD) is one method the repair shops can use to send back an asset that is miss-identified. Learn how this effects the supply chain in this video. This is not an exhausted list by any means; however, this should shape your thoughts about the complexities of the supply chain in order to reduce these errors in the future.

Supply Chain Management Discrepancies
09:33
TNMCS
05:55
Administrative Gated Process with the Art of the Possible
21:14